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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1173

post #17581 of 19848
Quote:
Originally Posted by benhour View Post

  Renovateur has bees wax in it (not a very big amount but it has) that's why you see the dusting effect (f.... i created a shoe care term hahahahahbigstar%5B1%5D.gif)!! the  bees wax brake off and creating the dust you see in creases or where the shoe flexes (less noticeable on tan shoes)!

  All conditioners more or less produce this dusting effect! The conditioners that dont produce so much dusting effect are the 1909  leather lotion from Colonil and lexol (i have never used bick4 though )
 On the other hand you can use dubbin but its quit difficult in handling (no to lees noticeable dusting effect)
i hope i helped a little bit!happy.gif  

term makes sense!

i'll need to try 1909  leather lotion from Colonil, but which lexol?
post #17582 of 19848
Hi guys. I'm looking for some advice.

I acquired some vintage Alden shell 990 PTBs. I'm not sure where they've been, but someone has at least been brushing them because they had little to no white bloom on them.

4XHRm6hl.jpg

The date suggests they're from a year ending in 8, and a fellow member in the Alden thread says that they were not using a V cleat any more in 1998, so it's likely 1988 or earlier.

I want to accomplish the following:

Clean the green stuff completely off the eyelets and wherever else it's ended up. I am guessing it's corrosion or tarnish.
aKTVQIWl.jpg

Condition them such that the shell is safe to flex. I've heard stories of vintage old shell cracking when worn.

My plan is to wipe then down with clean, damp cloth, brush, and use Lexol all over the uppers.

I'm not sure how to safely remove the green gunk. I haven't tried anything yet.

Thoughts?

Here is the album for any one interested.
post #17583 of 19848
@gsgleason -those are really cool. Vintage Aldens are excellent.

Definitely be sure to moisturize the shell. Bick 4 could be a safer bet, at least to start.

I doubt they have been brushed much. Sometimes there is less bloom, and on an old pair, anything is possible. They look just about ready to go. Enjoy!
post #17584 of 19848
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


As with most things, I think messing around with any part of your footwear offers more opportunity for poor results than better ones. I did an experiment a while back oiling some soles and leaving others alone. The left alone ones lasted longer. I just attribute it to the oils softening the leather. Walking on softer leather probably just makes it wear faster. I mean, it makes sense to me. The only time I would really oil soles if you're going to do it at all is after they get wet and you've let them dry. I'd also do it sparingly.

 

During a recent search, I found an old thread where you had a problem with the leather of your shoes cracking at the vamp where they crease the most from walking, and someone had attributed this to "only using Renovateur" without any polish. Do you still recommend not using Renovateur as the sole shoe care product?

post #17585 of 19848
Using renovateur without polish isn't what I was doing. I was just using renovateur solely as a conditioner. Honestly I think the cracking at my vamps probably has less to do with what conditioners I use and more to do with the fact that I wear dress shoes exclusively and walk a great deal.

I think conditioning leather is an overrated concept for the majority of shoes out there. You're just doing something aesthetically pleasing, furthermore most shoes have topcoats on them so you're really not even conditioning the leather, you're just treating the topcoat.
post #17586 of 19848
Quote:
Originally Posted by gsgleason View Post

Hi guys. I'm looking for some advice.

I acquired some vintage Alden shell 990 PTBs. I'm not sure where they've been, but someone has at least been brushing them because they had little to no white bloom on them.



The date suggests they're from a year ending in 8, and a fellow member in the Alden thread says that they were not using a V cleat any more in 1998, so it's likely 1988 or earlier.

I want to accomplish the following:

Clean the green stuff completely off the eyelets and wherever else it's ended up. I am guessing it's corrosion or tarnish.


Condition them such that the shell is safe to flex. I've heard stories of vintage old shell cracking when worn.

My plan is to wipe then down with clean, damp cloth, brush, and use Lexol all over the uppers.

I'm not sure how to safely remove the green gunk. I haven't tried anything yet.

Thoughts?

Here is the album for any one interested.

I would treat the lining with Lexol as well.

post #17587 of 19848
Here is what I did last night.

I scraped the green stuff of the eyelets the best I could with a dental scaler. It was all over the outside as well as inside between the quarter lining and the shell. It looks like the hidden eyelets had some sort of paint to make them look brass, but it was shiny metal underneath. The coating appears to have corroded over time, turning a blue/green color. It was hard and chipped off.

I think the best solution would be to remove the eyelets altogether and install new ones, but I've read that's very expensive, sometimes $15 per eyelet. For a pair of shoes with 20 total eyelets, that would be ridiculous. If anyone knows how much that typically runs, please let me know.

I then wiped everything down with a clean cloth with diluted vinegar, followed by Lexol all over the uppers and the dark leather bit that runs around the opening. I clearly don't know my shoe terminology.

I did another coat of Lexol this morning, inside and out. It's almost alarming how quickly it soaks into the shell.

The conditioner made the color a little more rich, and it's quite attractive. My plan is to let them rest for a day at least, then go over with renovateur to get a nice sheen.

Since I'll probably have to talk to a cobbler about removing the metal V cleat, I may as well talk to him about eyelet replacement.
post #17588 of 19848

I've tried renovateur but still these black marks, no idea what they are. Do i have to buy some reno mat? or is there something else i could try?

it looks like a kind of bruising if thst helps any..

AppleMark

Thanks


Edited by eddiegreen - 1/27/16 at 11:29am
post #17589 of 19848
Quote:
Originally Posted by gsgleason View Post

Here is what I did last night.

I scraped the green stuff of the eyelets the best I could with a dental scaler. It was all over the outside as well as inside between the quarter lining and the shell. It looks like the hidden eyelets had some sort of paint to make them look brass, but it was shiny metal underneath. The coating appears to have corroded over time, turning a blue/green color. It was hard and chipped off.

I think the best solution would be to remove the eyelets altogether and install new ones, but I've read that's very expensive, sometimes $15 per eyelet. For a pair of shoes with 20 total eyelets, that would be ridiculous. If anyone knows how much that typically runs, please let me know.

I then wiped everything down with a clean cloth with diluted vinegar, followed by Lexol all over the uppers and the dark leather bit that runs around the opening. I clearly don't know my shoe terminology.

I did another coat of Lexol this morning, inside and out. It's almost alarming how quickly it soaks into the shell.

The conditioner made the color a little more rich, and it's quite attractive. My plan is to let them rest for a day at least, then go over with renovateur to get a nice sheen.

Since I'll probably have to talk to a cobbler about removing the metal V cleat, I may as well talk to him about eyelet replacement.

Why bother removing the cleat?
post #17590 of 19848
Quote:
Originally Posted by smoothie1 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by gsgleason View Post

Here is what I did last night.

I scraped the green stuff of the eyelets the best I could with a dental scaler. It was all over the outside as well as inside between the quarter lining and the shell. It looks like the hidden eyelets had some sort of paint to make them look brass, but it was shiny metal underneath. The coating appears to have corroded over time, turning a blue/green color. It was hard and chipped off.

I think the best solution would be to remove the eyelets altogether and install new ones, but I've read that's very expensive, sometimes $15 per eyelet. For a pair of shoes with 20 total eyelets, that would be ridiculous. If anyone knows how much that typically runs, please let me know.

I then wiped everything down with a clean cloth with diluted vinegar, followed by Lexol all over the uppers and the dark leather bit that runs around the opening. I clearly don't know my shoe terminology.

I did another coat of Lexol this morning, inside and out. It's almost alarming how quickly it soaks into the shell.

The conditioner made the color a little more rich, and it's quite attractive. My plan is to let them rest for a day at least, then go over with renovateur to get a nice sheen.

Since I'll probably have to talk to a cobbler about removing the metal V cleat, I may as well talk to him about eyelet replacement.

Why bother removing the cleat?

First, they're commonly referred to as a suicide heel. The building I work in has lots of smooth hard floors, like granite and tile, and if you walk heel first and come down on the metal, you'll slip.

Second, I spent a lot of money on new hardwood floors in my house, and I don't want to mess them up (any more than my wife and kid already do). biggrin.gif
post #17591 of 19848
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Using renovateur without polish isn't what I was doing. I was just using renovateur solely as a conditioner. Honestly I think the cracking at my vamps probably has less to do with what conditioners I use and more to do with the fact that I wear dress shoes exclusively and walk a great deal.

I think conditioning leather is an overrated concept for the majority of shoes out there. You're just doing something aesthetically pleasing, furthermore most shoes have topcoats on them so you're really not even conditioning the leather, you're just treating the topcoat.

Not sure I agree with this.
post #17592 of 19848

Does anyone have experience with using Terrago Nano on calf leather? I would think it would then interfere with using polish. Am I correct?

post #17593 of 19848
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbhan12 View Post


Not sure I agree with this.

 

The last sentence does sound a bit odd, Patrick. Are you really saying the leather shoes can't be conditioned?  I can understand that people might use too much conditioner, too often, but I would have thought it had it's place. By extension, would you rule also rule out cream polish as a product with which to care for leather shoes? If conditioner can''t get through to the leather, it seems unlikely that polishes would. 

 

I can see your point with regard to corrected grain shoes but I thought that most other sorts of leather shoes were able to absorb products that are used on them, at least to a minimal degree. If none of it gets through the 'topcoat'. wouldn't it be best just to wipe our shoes over with a damp cloth and leave it at that?  That would seem to undermine the point of this thread!

post #17594 of 19848
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbhan12 View Post

Not sure I agree with this.
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

... for the majority of shoes out there.

The majority of shoes out there are disposable garbage, not that I think pB wears those.

Patrick, have you been able to gauge the effectiveness Lexol in the long term for your well-used footwear?
post #17595 of 19848
Quote:
Originally Posted by gsgleason View Post



The majority of shoes out there are disposable garbage, not that I think pB wears those.

Patrick, have you been able to gauge the effectiveness Lexol in the long term for your well-used footwear?

 

Let's not nitpick words here. 

 

In my opinion, with some application of science and logic, leather will not crack if it has some form of moisture in it. Possible to tear, but not crack. Think of a leaf still on a tree and one on the ground during the fall. One is crunchy and cracks because it doesn't have water in it anymore (moisture). Similarly, think of a small twig. It can crack and snap easily if it is dry, but if it's wet the wood will simply bend (again moisture). 

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