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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1167

post #17491 of 19213
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newberry View Post






Thanks for the reply. Also another quick question. Sorry I'm new to AE but is this side creasing normal for the Strand. This is my first time wearing them and I've only worn them for 3 hours so far and not a lot of walking. The other shoe doesn't seem to have this problem. I know these are the right size because I got my foot measured at the store. Thanks!

 

This all sounds good to me. Bear in mind that our feet aren't symmetrical, so creasing will not necessarily be the same with each shoe. 

post #17492 of 19213
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whirling View Post
 


Aren't there some sizing systems that are meant to be better standardized, such as Mondopoint?  I have noticed that different USA manufacturers will convert their sizes into different European sizes and wondered if this reflected randomness or that the European sizing system is more consistent than the one in the USA.  Then, I just don't know how much one can rely on sizes given in centimeters or the Japanese system.  UK sizing, that I have experiences, seems no more consistent than USA sizing.

 

I guess another possible explanation for some of the variability is that the footwear manufacturers are trying to size based on an implied heel-to-ball length, even though they are giving "overall" sizes.  Then, of course, pointy-toe shoes would be longer than ones with rounder toes, and people who obsess too much over how much room in front of their toes they have and not whether the balls of their feet line up correctly experience more variability.

 

My slightly narrow, low volume feet, with short toes frequently lead me into danger with getting footwear that is too small.  All the available D-width footwear encourages me to buy a smaller size to get the volume right.  Then, my short toes allow me to fit into footwear with generous room in the toe box.  And, in the end, the footwear doesn't fit well.  Bah.  I have come to realize that I must only buy footwear that has plenty of apparently extra space in the toe and that something is probably wrong if D-width footwear fits me well in thin socks.  Of course, I am also pursuing some C-width footwear...

 

Sorry for the long rant...


i know exactly what you mean. i have a very long narrow foot and my heel to ball measurement is actually 1 size longer than my overall foot length too. It is common for people like us to try to go down a size to get it to feel like enough room in front of the toes and to feel tight enough on the foot, but that can cause more damage by not having a well fitting shoe. 

 

it is better to have extra space in front of your shoes and get a narrow width (or add an insole / full sock liner to effectively reduce the internal width / volume) so the ball of your foot meets at the widest part of the shoe. That will allow for adequate bending when walking in them. 

 

 

No imagine your problem but being a AAA width on top of it to get the correct size in heel to ball length. That is near impossible, but if I go down a full size it can bring it down to an A width. haha. It still doesn't help much unless I also do double socks (remove another width to put me at around a B) and then a sock liner / insole (now to about a C). That is all of the work needed to get a pair to be close to fitting in normal width and it still is a little wide for me. So trust me, I feel your pain.

 

 

 

Moral of the story is to make sure that your ball of your foot is at that widest part of the shoe (where the shoe flexes). It is fine to have extra room at the front of your foot. If the shoe is too wide, you can make adjustments or see if a brand will make a more narrow width. 

 

If you are a wide width, then you can check for the many brands that offer wide width, without needing to go up another size in length. 

 

Hope that helps. 

post #17493 of 19213
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred G. Unn View Post



I personally don't have any use at all for dauber brushes. I find I don't have nearly as much control over the amount I'm applying with a dauber as I do with my fingers and a cloth. I'm mostly using Selvyt cloths now and if IIRC I think it was @Munky that first recommended them. They really work great without giving off any lint and they are washable too. I do use different color full size brushes though. Maybe that's a bit unnecessary but I have one for black, dark brown, light brown, and burg plus a separate brush just for dust I keep on my dresser to give a quick brushing before putting the shoes on and right after taking them off.

For those that use daubers, why do you prefer them over just using fingers and cloth?


I don't use daubers either. I just use fingers and a cloth because I feel that I get more control as well. Plus that saves me on a lot of dauber brushes that I don't need to buy / use / clean. 

 

I do use different horse hair brushes. One for black, one for browns, one for burgundy/cordovan/etc. I also have a pig bristle brush for grain leathers and a goat hair for high shines.

 

I also have some clean socks that I use for dusting off the shoes if needed. 

post #17494 of 19213
I use finger with cloth and or cotton balls for dress shoes. However I apply the black boot dressing for my winter boots with a dauber because its easier, especially down at the stitching of the upper to the sole. With the black boots there's really not much control needed. Just get it on there and cover everything so it's water proof again.
post #17495 of 19213
Dry desert humour alert!!

Daubers are for sissies.

Flannel PJ's are the ticket. Nothing more honourable than a black or brown finger.
post #17496 of 19213

If you wake up late and need to polish your shoes quickly, you could do a lot worse than use Saphir Creme Universelle. It is a liquid polish that goes on quickly and which doesn't leaver white marks around broguing. A Fine Par of Shoes suggest you 'polish immediately after application because of rapid solvent evaporation.'  The bottle says to leave 5 minutes before polishing. I have tried both and can't see the difference. A great product. 

post #17497 of 19213
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Dry desert humour alert!!

Daubers are for sissies.

Flannel PJ's are the ticket. Nothing more honourable than a black or brown finger.

hahaha, 

 

Well I use dauber brushes to apply bee wax all around the welt and the sole edge.  I think they are good too for brogues shoes.  I never put any kind of cosmetics directly on my fingers. I will think about using Flannel PJ´s....:satisfied: 

post #17498 of 19213
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

This all sounds good to me. Bear in mind that our feet aren't symmetrical, so creasing will not necessarily be the same with each shoe. 
Quite true...and people do obsess about creasing more than is necessary, IMO.

That said, I was always taught that if the creases are severely angled towards the lateral heel, it is usually a sign that the shoes are too short for the foot. I've seen such creasing and even sporadically questioned the owners of the shoes. But I am pretty careful about HB relationships and have never fit a customer such that angled creases developed...so I can't really confirm it or not.

edited for punctuation and clarity
Edited by DWFII - 1/7/16 at 10:14am
post #17499 of 19213
Quote:
Originally Posted by mw313 View Post


i know exactly what you mean. i have a very long narrow foot and my heel to ball measurement is actually 1 size longer than my overall foot length too. It is common for people like us to try to go down a size to get it to feel like enough room in front of the toes and to feel tight enough on the foot, but that can cause more damage by not having a well fitting shoe. 

it is better to have extra space in front of your shoes and get a narrow width (or add an insole / full sock liner to effectively reduce the internal width / volume) so the ball of your foot meets at the widest part of the shoe. That will allow for adequate bending when walking in them. 

...

Good post.

Only one caveat--I would just observe that while adding a 3rd party insole or heavy, full length sock is a common enough way to correct a too large shoe, there is an "orange peel" effect that will change the internal H-B length. People forget (or dismiss) that but it can be critically important.

Additionally, and all too often, esp. on contemporary RTW, there simply isn't enough height inside the shoe to accommodate both the insole/sock and the toes of the foot. IMO, adding an insole is always a "kludge" and one that is more often than not disappointingly inadequate.

Sometimes fixes such as this are not really...creating other problems that may actually be more severe, esp. in the long run.

--
Edited by DWFII - 1/7/16 at 10:13am
post #17500 of 19213
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Dry desert humour alert!!

Daubers are for sissies.

Flannel PJ's are the ticket. Nothing more honourable than a black or brown finger.

I'm loving it. I use undershirts at time too. Or nice socks to cover the fingers but that is the most.
post #17501 of 19213
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Good post.

Only one caveat--I would just observe that while adding a 3rd party insole or heavy, full length sock is a common enough way to correct a too large shoe, there is an "orange peel" effect that will change the internal H-B length. People forget (or dismiss) that but it can be critically important.

Additionally, and all too often, esp. on contemporary RTW, there simply isn't enough height inside the shoe to accommodate both the insole/sock and the toes of the foot. IMO, adding an insole is always a "kludge" and one that is more often than not disappointingly inadequate.

Sometimes fixes such as this are not really...creating other problems that may actually be more severe, esp. in the long run.

--

Thanks and I know exactly what you mean.

The lip on the 3rd party insoles can push the foot a bit forward which can off set the heel to ball relationship. I would only do that if absolutely needed. It is better to use a dress shoe insole which does not have that lip and just lifts the foot up to give some mild support and reduce volume in the shoe. They are a bit more money but it can be worth it. Some also do not go up to the toes and just stop right before the ball of the foot so it does not affect the room up front at the toes

Of course if you can just get the sock liners from the maker, it will just be a flat piece of leather that is cut to the exact insole which will only lift the foot up straight to reduce volume. I prefer them so the fit is not changed much. Now of course if you add more than one, you would need the following liners to be cut smaller because the volume will keep decreasing as the foot is lifted or there will be more of that effect that DW mentioned.

Hope that helps to take it a bit further

Thanks for the comment @DWFII
post #17502 of 19213
I wanted to redo the antiquing on the toe area of some JM Weston plain toe bluchers and stripped the color of the toe area using Reno Mat. I've applied probably around 10 layers of Saphir cream and wax on the area, but I'm hardly getting the toe to take on the brown color (so it remains noticeably much lighter than the rest of the shoe, with a whitish slightly brown hue). Is it the case I should have considered whether I had crust leather vs. aniline dyed leather? I am now guessing I have the latter. Should I be using a brown dye to recolor the toe? If so, which is recommended? And if I wanted to get an antiquing effect, how would I accomplish that? Would it be through dye alone or dye and then layers of wax on top of that?
post #17503 of 19213
Quote:
Originally Posted by teddieriley View Post

I wanted to redo the antiquing on the toe area of some JM Weston plain toe bluchers and stripped the color of the toe area using Reno Mat. I've applied probably around 10 layers of Saphir cream and wax on the area, but I'm hardly getting the toe to take on the brown color (so it remains noticeably much lighter than the rest of the shoe, with a whitish slightly brown hue). Is it the case I should have considered whether I had crust leather vs. aniline dyed leather? I am now guessing I have the latter. Should I be using a brown dye to recolor the toe? If so, which is recommended? And if I wanted to get an antiquing effect, how would I accomplish that? Would it be through dye alone or dye and then layers of wax on top of that?

Yes, JMW uses only aniline dyed leather from Bastin tannery in Fr. Sorry, cant help you to get an antiquing effect on your shoes.

post #17504 of 19213

The first photo is a pair of new Sanders boots, as they look when they arrive. The colour is a very uniform mid-brown, which doesn't look great to my eyes.

 

The second photo is the same model of boot (which they only sell in one colour by the way) but they look much lighter, and more 'vintage', as if they've been aged in some way.

Maybe they have just been though a genuine age/wear process, but I've had a pair of this model before and they never went like that for me so I'm doubting it's just wear.  I'm thinking that they've been treated in some way - bleached or something.

Anyone got any ideas how I can replicate this look?  

 

Thanks in advance.

 

post #17505 of 19213

They might just need some conditioner and a bit of colour wax, that is all.  They look really nice to me.  Nice boots with that extensive wear.

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