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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1162

post #17416 of 19067
Is Venetian Shoe Cream the same thing as Venetian Imperial Balm? Just wondering. I was going to order the later from Rancourt & Co. and I just want to make sure it was the same as the former. They only sell the Imperial Balm

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post #17417 of 19067

Hey guys, brand new to styleforum - I was asking on /r/goodyearwelt about my Red Wing Iron Rangers and a few people suggested I post here. 

 

Had these  Iron Rangers for about four years, worn about every other day. Fell off a motorcycle and tore up the leather fairly early on but they're still waterproof so I just treat them with boot oil every few months.

This has happened twice now though: XeTN7X1.jpg

Another angle: kzNJC4d.jpg

The welt itself is torn. Uppers are still fine (surface damage notwithstanding) and honestly the soles still have plenty of wear, but I'm scared to wear them at the moment in case I stub my toe and tear the whole thing off.

The first time this happened, I took it in and the guy just restitched it somehow. I thought at first he had patched the welt somehow, but it all looks continuous (except for the tear) so my guess is just that he managed to catch enough of it to restitch it to the sole. Must not have been enough though, cause it only held for about a year before tearing again.

If I get the shoe resoled, will the welt be replaced in the process? If I just get it repaired again, like before, should I expect better results from a better shop?

post #17418 of 19067

If the upper's structure is fine a good cobbler should be able to stitch a new welt to it and resole it. I would not have it repaired like before, especially if the result was not satisfying.

 

Btw, those scratches look cool :)

post #17419 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by gberryman View Post

If I get the shoe resoled, will the welt be replaced in the process? If I just get it repaired again, like before, should I expect better results from a better shop?

It would have to be.

Frankly, I don't think it has anything to do with "a better shop." Certainly the original quality of the welting leaves a lot to be desired...but I suspect it has more to do with the quantity and quality of the oil you're using. One of the first things I'd look at is whether there is any mineral oil or petro-chemicals in the product.

Beyond that, it is possible to over-saturate any leather, regardless of quality, with too much oil. And then the fibers lose coherence.

--
Edited by DWFII - 12/25/15 at 7:27am
post #17420 of 19067

I use the Red Wing boot oil, which I believe is a mineral/mink blend with beeswax. I definitely don't oil them excessively, I don't think i've ever done it twice in three months - but I'll look into finding a product without mineral oil.

post #17421 of 19067

I have got a couple of pairs of shoes - and seen a lot more - with a knot in the sole stitching that is clearly visible. It is usually seen half way up the edge of the sole. Why is this?  I would have thought that when the sole is sewn, the knot might come under the heel stack or that the maker could start off with enough thread to go right round the sole.  It doesn't seem to make a difference to the wearability of the shoes but, speaking for myself, I always check this for fear of the knot coming undone. I appreciate, though, that the knot has come somewhere but a lot more shoes don't show this, so why the outliers? Yours with Christmas greetings, Munky. 

post #17422 of 19067

Hello there. I'm having hard time trying to polish my shoes. I'm using whole product range from Saphir (Renovateur, Pommadier color cream, Pate de Lux wax).

 

I'm following this guide http://www.theshoesnobblog.com/polish-your-shoes-properly

 

My problem is:

I'm doing spit shine method and when I apply wax and droplets of water on my shoe, then after few circles around the shoe - the wax dries and there is a huge resistance in movement over the shoe. I usually apply more water without wax but it seems it just does not help (in fact more water removed the applied layer of wax).

 

Another problem is that after wax, even if I let the shoes sit for 20 minutes or over night - there is still polish residue (the leather is not shiny, but covered in matter wax layer).

 

Can you suggest me what am I doing wrong please?

post #17423 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by palodelincak View Post

Hello there. I'm having hard time trying to polish my shoes. I'm using whole product range from Saphir (Renovateur, Pommadier color cream, Pate de Lux wax).

I'm following this guide http://www.theshoesnobblog.com/polish-your-shoes-properly

My problem is:
I'm doing spit shine method and when I apply wax and droplets of water on my shoe, then after few circles around the shoe - the wax dries and there is a huge resistance in movement over the shoe. I usually apply more water without wax but it seems it just does not help (in fact more water removed the applied layer of wax).

Another problem is that after wax, even if I let the shoes sit for 20 minutes or over night - there is still polish residue (the leather is not shiny, but covered in matter wax layer).

Can you suggest me what am I doing wrong please?

I'd like to shed some light.
Although I haven't waxed shoes before.
I have waxed & polished several of my Porsche cars.

The concept is similar.

It sounds like you're putting on my way too much product.
I remember putting on way too much carnauba wax. It left a blurry dull shine. Had to use dish soap (very abrasive by nature) to get it off & start from scratch.

Also, keep in mind. Inherently, you'll have to buff off the product after it cures (settles) the next day.

This is excess product your shoe could not absorb.

Use a horse hair brush to buff it off.
post #17424 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by palodelincak View Post
 

Hello there. I'm having hard time trying to polish my shoes. I'm using whole product range from Saphir (Renovateur, Pommadier color cream, Pate de Lux wax).

 

I'm following this guide http://www.theshoesnobblog.com/polish-your-shoes-properly

 

My problem is:

I'm doing spit shine method and when I apply wax and droplets of water on my shoe, then after few circles around the shoe - the wax dries and there is a huge resistance in movement over the shoe. I usually apply more water without wax but it seems it just does not help (in fact more water removed the applied layer of wax).

 

Another problem is that after wax, even if I let the shoes sit for 20 minutes or over night - there is still polish residue (the leather is not shiny, but covered in matter wax layer).

 

Can you suggest me what am I doing wrong please?

 

I'm no expert, but while I disagree with one piece of the post above (dish soap is not typically abrasive at all, but it will strip wax from the paint), I think he's on the right point:  You're likely using too much product.  The key is to use a tiny bit of wax and a tiny bit of water, and go with a bunch of layers - 5-7 or more. 

 

I'd also say you should make sure that your shoes are absolutely dry before you start to apply wax.  If you've used Renovateur, I'd personally wait a couple hours or even overnight to allow that product to fully "dry" before you start to wax.

 

Lastly, I give a minimum of 20 minutes between steps, and more often 30 or more.   

 

His YouTube video is useful if you haven't watched it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yPhqQEdhtxI 

post #17425 of 19067
I generally find it useful to have a relatively damp cloth, like actually dipped in water, and just a tiny touch of polish, with small circular movements and very gentle pressure. Eventually the water will be beading with no more swirl marks from the polish. At this point, get a tiny touch more polish, and repeat.
Edited by gsgleason - 12/27/15 at 3:17pm
post #17426 of 19067

I suppose that once all your shoes are worn in and comfortable, it is time to buy a new pair. 

post #17427 of 19067
Does deer bone work on CXL?
post #17428 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by M635Guy View Post

Does deer bone work on CXL?

Does it work for what exactly?

I have found that any hard, smooth object works on any leather to smooth out creases or dents, as long as the surface isn't actually lacerated. I've used my artificial and natural dear bones for CXL to smooth out scuffs and creases.
post #17429 of 19067

This, I hope, is my last posting about polishing corrected grain, for fear of your dying with boredom.  It is a useful analogy that gets a brief mention on the Well Dressed Dad page. Polishing CG is like polishing a car. You wash the car, rub on wax and buff to a shine. The wax doesn't get absorbed by the paintwork nor by the body of the car. Similarly with CG. Wipe off with damp cloth, apply wax and buff off. Nothing else needs to be done. Indeed, nothing else can be done.

 

I happen to like Dr Marten's shoes, for an occasional outing. I have a pair of the 'original', 1461s. They are made of CG but you wouldn't, automatically know it. The leather has a sheen, rather than a shine and the leather tends to roll rather than crease. Videos and other media contributions on the net, tend to fall into one of two camps. There are those that discuss 'softening' or 'conditioning' CG with different sorts of creams and potions, (which will make no difference to the leather). The other camp illustrate working up a mirror shine, using wax - something that can be done. I mention all this because it illustrates how not all CG shoes start with a bright shine, but that a decent shine can be achieved, if you want it. If you don't, you can just wipe the shoes with a cloth. 

 

One last thought on companies such as Church's using CG. This makes perfect sense to me, for those in business, government and so on, who need to have clean and shiny shoes. Rather than having a time consuming cycle of cleaning, conditioning and polishing, the busy user just has to wipe his pairs of shoes off with a damp cloth. Just this and the wearer is still seen to be wearing 'good' shoes. 

 

With fond regards,

Munky

post #17430 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

This, I hope, is my last posting about polishing corrected grain, for fear of your dying with boredom.  It is a useful analogy that gets a brief mention on the Well Dressed Dad page. Polishing CG is like polishing a car. You wash the car, rub on wax and buff to a shine. The wax doesn't get absorbed by the paintwork nor by the body of the car. Similarly with CG. Wipe off with damp cloth, apply wax and buff off. Nothing else needs to be done. Indeed, nothing else can be done.

 

I happen to like Dr Marten's shoes, for an occasional outing. I have a pair of the 'original', 1461s. They are made of CG but you wouldn't, automatically know it. The leather has a sheen, rather than a shine and the leather tends to roll rather than crease. Videos and other media contributions on the net, tend to fall into one of two camps. There are those that discuss 'softening' or 'conditioning' CG with different sorts of creams and potions, (which will make no difference to the leather). The other camp illustrate working up a mirror shine, using wax - something that can be done. I mention all this because it illustrates how not all CG shoes start with a bright shine, but that a decent shine can be achieved, if you want it. If you don't, you can just wipe the shoes with a cloth. 

 

One last thought on companies such as Church's using CG. This makes perfect sense to me, for those in business, government and so on, who need to have clean and shiny shoes. Rather than having a time consuming cycle of cleaning, conditioning and polishing, the busy user just has to wipe his pairs of shoes off with a damp cloth. Just this and the wearer is still seen to be wearing 'good' shoes. 

 

With fond regards,

Munky

 

EDIT: Somehow lost that Munky was talking about CG - I was speaking more about calf. Sorry for the confusion. The car/CG analogy makes more sense. 

 

I like the wax analogy - it makes perfect sense to me. I have waxed a lot of cars and a lot of wood. You could never treat a piece of wood with stain or oil without first removing the wax. This is why people conditioning their shoes with wax on them is perplexing to me. It seems like conditioner acts as a solvent for the wax, but you still have wax on the show when using conditioner. Perhaps I'm overthinking this. For now I'm sticking with conditioner as needed (rarely) and colored conditioner more rarely. 

 

Re the DMs - I have a two pairs of Docs and wear them both as bad-weather shoes. They're durable but heavy and ugly. Mine are the ForLife shoes, which are noticeably inferior to the DM UK made shoes. When I bought them the DM sales guy told me they were better quality. Of course this makes no business sense - they would have to be much lower cost to make the lifetime replacement model viable. And I agree that that Docs certainly don't look like other CG shoes. (EDIT: don't mean to badmouth DM - the ForLife shoes are a bargain, and DM has been great to deal with.)


Edited by Dario65 - 12/30/15 at 6:49am
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