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post #17341 of 19045

Yea. Thanks DWFII. Amazing story there.

post #17342 of 19045

Great info DWFII.

post #17343 of 19045

Hi gents, 

 

After polishing my old shoes yesterday I found that it is hard for me to run my fingers across the surface of the toe box (where I applied a mirror shine). 

 

Somehow I expect the surface to be smooth but instead I felt some friction, is this because of the quality of the leather? (As you can see the quality of the shoes is not the best) Or maybe this is due to some other reasons?

 

Thanks in advance,

 

Nelson

 

p.s. I used saphir renovateur, cream and wax.

 

post #17344 of 19045
I'm still learning the art of polishing shoes. Fortunately, I made things easy for myself and got a pair of shell cordovan shoes, which seems to be more about not doing anything foolish rather than doing something fancy to maintain the shoes.

On a whim, I picked up a goat leather chamois that I used for cleaning glass lenses, and used them to buff my shells, Wow - maybe I am just imagining things, but it seem to do a much better job than the cotton flannel rags that I usually use.

I'm sure this is nothing new to most shoe shine experts, but in all the research I conducted on how to shine shoes, I never really came across any suggestions for using a goat leather chamois.

I understand that the process of tanning goat leather chamois involves infusing the goat leather with fish oils. Is this what makes it produce such an impressive shine when used on shell cordovan? Also, is there a negative to using authentic goat leather chamois? I wonder why I don't hear about it more often
post #17345 of 19045
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saturninus View Post

I'm still learning the art of polishing shoes. Fortunately, I made things easy for myself and got a pair of shell cordovan shoes, which seems to be more about not doing anything foolish rather than doing something fancy to maintain the shoes.

On a whim, I picked up a goat leather chamois that I used for cleaning glass lenses, and used them to buff my shells, Wow - maybe I am just imagining things, but it seem to do a much better job than the cotton flannel rags that I usually use.

I'm sure this is nothing new to most shoe shine experts, but in all the research I conducted on how to shine shoes, I never really came across any suggestions for using a goat leather chamois.

I understand that the process of tanning goat leather chamois involves infusing the goat leather with fish oils. Is this what makes it produce such an impressive shine when used on shell cordovan? Also, is there a negative to using authentic goat leather chamois? I wonder why I don't hear about it more often

A quick glance at Wikipedia states that chamois leather is commonly used for shoe polishing. Apparently the leather is not very abrasive, which makes me believe that the shoe cream and wax applied on the shoes is more evenly heated and the structure not grinded as much as it would using a cotton or wool cloth - resulting in a cleaner and faster shine. That is probably a marginal discrepancy only visible on microscopic level.

 

Either that or I went full bullsh*t. :bounce2:

post #17346 of 19045

I just want to be able to say I polished my shoes with a goat...

post #17347 of 19045
Quote:
Originally Posted by M635Guy View Post
 

I just want to be able to say I polished my shoes with a goat...

 

Let me correct that for you.

 

"I just want to be able to say I rubbed my horse ass shoe with a deer bone, and then polish it off with a goat"

 

post #17348 of 19045

A Fine Pair of Shoes, here in the UK, sell large pieces chamois leather, so I guess there are people buying it and using it on their shoes.

post #17349 of 19045
It all makes sense. I guess people don't use chamois more often because they are more expensive, but they sure do seem effective.
post #17350 of 19045
Where do you gents typically clean your shoes? In the garage? Outside? Bathtub? Do you lay-down newspaper?
post #17351 of 19045
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1up View Post

Where do you gents typically clean your shoes? In the garage? Outside? Bathtub? Do you lay-down newspaper?

Most often on the couch while watching TV. I'll lay a towel across my lap. I'm mainly applying conditioner and or paste wax there. If the shoes are truly dirty, I'll take care of that on the porch.
post #17352 of 19045
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1up View Post

Where do you gents typically clean your shoes? In the garage? Outside? Bathtub? Do you lay-down newspaper?

 

If you're really into the whole process, you will have one of those fancy leather aprons and sit anywhere with the shoes on your lap.

 

I just lay some newspaper on the table and work on the table while watching tv.

post #17353 of 19045

I've been looking at some heavy-duty work boots from various manufacturers lately.  Most have two, three, or even four rows of stitching between different pieces of their leather uppers.  How many rows are actually helpful?

 

At first, one could imagine that the more rows of stitches, the better, and perhaps that is the case.  However, it would seem that more rows of stitches puts more holes in the leather, which could let in water or cause weakness over a broader patch of it.  Presumably, one would have to skive more off the leather, if that is the correct term?  I could imagine that the rows of stitches, if not done properly could work against each other?  Perhaps one would prefer a seam to rip out than get a rip in the adjacent piece of leather?  Or, is it just the case that every extra row delays the eventual failure of the boot?

 

If you have a row of stitches that is coming out, do you need to get it repaired promptly if there are other rows there?  In other words, does "a stitch in time save nine?"

 

I look forward to hearing what other people have know about this.

 

Thanks so much.

 

Regards,

Jon

post #17354 of 19045
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whirling View Post
 

I've been looking at some heavy-duty work boots from various manufacturers lately.  Most have two, three, or even four rows of stitching between different pieces of their leather uppers.  How many rows are actually helpful?

 

At first, one could imagine that the more rows of stitches, the better, and perhaps that is the case.  However, it would seem that more rows of stitches puts more holes in the leather, which could let in water or cause weakness over a broader patch of it.  Presumably, one would have to skive more off the leather, if that is the correct term?  I could imagine that the rows of stitches, if not done properly could work against each other?  Perhaps one would prefer a seam to rip out than get a rip in the adjacent piece of leather?  Or, is it just the case that every extra row delays the eventual failure of the boot?

 

If you have a row of stitches that is coming out, do you need to get it repaired promptly if there are other rows there?  In other words, does "a stitch in time save nine?"

 

I look forward to hearing what other people have know about this.

 

Thanks so much.

 

Regards,

Jon

 

I'm far from an expert, but thinking logically, more rows of stitches would be stronger, given they're not so close to each other that the holes overlay and just make one big hole. 

 

As an analogy, take two blocks of wood, long nail to connect them. The blocks of wood is free to rotate around the axis of the nail. Now let's put another nail in, so the rotation is even more limited, but if you really try you can get them to move. Now another, and then another. Eventually you'll put enough nails in (with proper spacing between them) that it's impossible to move the wooden blocks. 

 

tl;dr 

 

Yes, more rows of stitches will be stronger, unless they're too close together. Part of it may be for show as well. 

post #17355 of 19045

I posted this issue long ago.

 

Before

 

 

And here we are the repair done by Carmina.

 

Oh well, better than nothing!!.

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