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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1152

post #17266 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

No, not really. To say that almost all shoes are made of corrected grain doesn't help in any discussion about CG and other types of leather. And there are major differences between CG and other sorts of leather. This is not snobbery but just to say that different types of leather need different types of care and have different characteristics. Tell a bespoke shoemaker that his shoes made of calf leather are much the same as those made of corrected grain won't win you many friends. 

+1

I know opinions on this guy and his company vary, but it was the best reference I could quickly pull up:

http://www.saddlebackleather.com/craftsmanship/chpt4-leather-101-lesson-in-leather

The diagram on the different layers of leather should be helpful. As I understand it, you can emboss full grain leather. So a pebble grain from the grain layer would still be high quality. Corrected grain is where you take something from corium, sand the surface down and spray a finish on the top. Here's what happens when that finish inevitably cracks and starts to fall apart:

post #17267 of 19272

All corrected grain is not the same. Corrected grain can be of low quality or high quality, with all  stops in between.  Church's, for example make very good quality shoes made in this type of leather. Some high street shops make some pretty awful shoes. 

 

It is not inevitable that CG shoes will 'crack and fall apart'. I know that it is not good practice to generalise from a sample of one, but I have two pairs of CG shoes (and 9 other pairs of calf leather ones). One of my pairs of CG shoes are now about 4 years old and still show no sign of any sort of cracking or wearing out. As I have indicated, above, I have infrequently used beeswax polish on them. The other pair are only a couple of weeks old. My guess is that these will last even longer. 

 

If I had to chose between CG and calf leather?  Calf leather every time. But these are just some thoughts on CG that - I think - don't get aired enough. 

post #17268 of 19272
Is Zapasman saying that full grain calf leather like those used by vass, carmina,AE etc are somewhat corrected?
post #17269 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapasman View Post
 

Hi benhour, any experience "painting" cordovan shoes?.  Is it possible?. If so, how to proceed to darken some light saddle shell into a mid brown shell?.  Thanks. 

Sorry i cant help with that!! i have never tried to change a color of a shell cordovan pair thats why i didnt answer in first place!! i think the best way to go is to use a dark brown polish (paste and then wax) to darken 2-3 shades the pair!! i dont know if a dye can penetrate well in cordovan!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Biggskip View Post

I have a grease stain (turkey grease to be precise) on a brown suede boot. Any advice for how I could remove the stain. TIA

use an eraser (if you are adventurous enough use a baby powder ) then brush it ll come off!! Then if it wont come out like that you can use a specified cleaner (saphir has a great one) !

post #17270 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by benhour View Post


use an eraser (if you are adventurous enough use a baby powder ) then brush it ll come off!! Then if it wont come out like that you can use a specified cleaner (saphir has a great one) !

Thank you good sir!
post #17271 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by Biggskip View Post


Thank you good sir!

Always happy to help if i can! 

post #17272 of 19272
I bought a couple of pairs of shoes (AE, John Varvatos) about a year ago but I've yet to wear them. Should I be concerned that the leather has dried out? If so, should I use any sort of conditioner or cream before I wear the shoes for the first time?
post #17273 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trqmaster View Post
 

Aren't technically almost all shoe leathers corrected grain? ie. pebble grain, hatch grain, smooth leather, etc. The surface has been corrected through sanding or printing a pattern.

 

Are we referring to patent leather? A coating on leather? not corrected grain?

Yes, technically most non aniline dye leathers are corrected grain; box calf it is not corrected grain.

 

Many have a shiny acrylic wax lacquer on top (patent) and others an opaque coating (EG country calf) both often applied to the grain surface as a dye.

 

Many leathers come from the tannery with blemishes, wrinkles, hair follicles, scars, blemishes and/or discoloration.  Other leathers are imprinted, boarded, sanded... to give them different textures (scotch/hatch grain). 

 

Tanneries can use excellent or bad leathers and  treatments to buff and correct them differ much.

 

For more info check to Leather Quality thread.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

 

No, not really. To say that almost all shoes are made of corrected grain doesn't help in any discussion about CG and other types of leather. And there are major differences between CG and other sorts of leather. This is not snobbery but just to say that different types of leather need different types of care and have different characteristics. Tell a bespoke shoemaker that his shoes made of calf leather are much the same as those made of corrected grain won't win you many friends. 

 

It was not my purpose to discuss about CG in this thread.  I do not need different shoe care regimes or products for my shoes whether they are box calf, museum, shell cordovan or CG.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by vmss View Post

Is Zapasman saying that full grain calf leather like those used by vass, carmina,AE etc are somewhat corrected?

 

No, I did not. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by benhour View Post
 

Sorry i cant help with that!! i have never tried to change a color of a shell cordovan pair thats why i didnt answer in first place!! i think the best way to go is to use a dark brown polish (paste and then wax) to darken 2-3 shades the pair!! i dont know if a dye can penetrate well in cordovan!

 

use an eraser (if you are adventurous enough use a baby powder ) then brush it ll come off!! Then if it wont come out like that you can use a specified cleaner (saphir has a great one) !

Thanks benhour.  I think I am not going to use any dyes on them.

post #17274 of 19272

I apologise for having made so many postings about CG and fully appreciate that this is not the right forum for them. Best wishes, Munky

post #17275 of 19272
I don't know where else would be all that much more appropriate esp. if it is part of a "how to care for" discussion.

Unless the grain of the leather is pretty much as it came off the animal, it technically has been "corrected." And yes, even high end calf skin can be "corrected." Calfskin does not come off the animal with n acrylic glaze or wax. It does not come off the animal with a pebble, or hatch grain or imprinted texture.

Aniline dye is just a type of petro-chemical derived dye. It doesn't have anything to do with whether a leather is corrected or not. Even high end "glazed' calfskin ...with an opaque top coat...was probably dyed with aniline dye. We call a leather "aniline dyed" when it doesn't have that top coat or that heavy wax, but most leathers are dyed with aniline dyes.
post #17276 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

I don't know where else would be all that much more appropriate esp. if it is part of a "how to care for" discussion.

Unless the grain of the leather is pretty much as it came off the animal, it technically has been "corrected." And yes, even high end calf skin can be "corrected." Calfskin does not come off the animal with n acrylic glaze or wax. It does not come off the animal with a pebble, or hatch grain or imprinted texture.

Aniline dye is just a type of petro-chemical derived dye. It doesn't have anything to do with whether a leather is corrected or not. Even high end "glazed' calfskin ...with an opaque top coat...was probably dyed with aniline dye. We call a leather "aniline dyed" when it doesn't have that top coat or that heavy wax, but most leathers are dyed with aniline dyes.
What about crust leather is it closest as being more natural that comes off an animal?
Edited by vmss - 12/7/15 at 8:24am
post #17277 of 19272
Crust isn't more natural it just doesn't have top coat.
post #17278 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

Crust isn't more natural it just doesn't have top coat.

I thought with crust is more difficult to hide imperfections, wrinkles and scars etc because of the leather is not finished as grain is not covered with struck through aniline dye and pigment,thus having more a natural feel to it.
post #17279 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by vmss View Post

What about crust leather is it closest as being more natural that comes off an animal?

In a sense, Yes. Leather doesn't come off the animal black or burgundy or green, either. Depending on the tannage it is "naturally" a pale tan or grey-blue.

Crust can be dyed with aniline dyes or natural water-based dyes. The former being...ostensibly...more "fast' (colourfast). But that may depend upon waxing etc..
post #17280 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by vmss View Post

I thought with crust is more difficult to hide imperfections, wrinkles and scars etc because of the leather is not finished as grain is not covered with struck through aniline dye and pigment,thus having more a natural feel to it.

They still go through most of the process in a tannery such as drumming, glassing, etc. it's not superior or inferior, just that they leave part of the dying and top coat process to the leather workers.
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