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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1150

post #17236 of 19076
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

 

You don't put Topys on full rubber soles and heels - they are already made of rubber! And the rubber is single unit made up of heel and sole. Have a look on the net, for Dainite soles, for an example. The same company make a much more heavy duty unit called Commando, too. 

 

In your message, you said that you were going to buy new shoes - future tense.  If you haven't bought them already, do consider the rubber soled and heel varieties. If you have bought them, already, it depends on what you paid for them and whether or not you can afford another pair. From the point of view of their being winter shoes, you need to consider if the uppers are fit for 'weather'.

 

I'm sorry to be a big gloomy but I hope this helps!  Munky

 

I meant "getting" as in "they are being shipped to me".

 

I prefer to have Topy because it is the cheapest and safest method to resoling shoes. These are Blake stitched so repeatedly having the half-soles replaced will mess with the insoles of the shoes. 

 

I don't like full rubber soles because the soles look bad and they cost more to resole than a Topy.

Thanks for the input though

post #17237 of 19076
Hi everyone, thanks for all your posts, very informative. I'm about to get some shoe care products and would like to know if I'm heading in the right direction:

  1. Allen Edmonds Cleaner/Conditioner
  2. Meltonian neutral cream.
    • From what I understand, the cream penetrates more into the leather and can affect the color more than a wax polish can, which is why I am opting from neutral. I've heard some things about the neutral cream resulting in white residues. Is this a such big issue that I should get shoe cream that matches the color better?
  3. Lincoln shoe polish. For the polish, I'm going to go with a color that matches the color of the shoe better

i've already got the rest (i.e. fabrics, brushes, etc). Let me know if there are any glaring omissions or potential pitfalls.

Thanks!
post #17238 of 19076
Quote:
Originally Posted by stgermaine View Post

Hi everyone, thanks for all your posts, very informative. I'm about to get some shoe care products and would like to know if I'm heading in the right direction:
 
  1. Allen Edmonds Cleaner/Conditioner
  2. Meltonian neutral cream.
    • From what I understand, the cream penetrates more into the leather and can affect the color more than a wax polish can, which is why I am opting from neutral. I've heard some things about the neutral cream resulting in white residues. Is this a such big issue that I should get shoe cream that matches the color better?
  3. Lincoln shoe polish. For the polish, I'm going to go with a color that matches the color of the shoe better

i've already got the rest (i.e. fabrics, brushes, etc). Let me know if there are any glaring omissions or potential pitfalls.

Thanks!

 

Saphir/Saphir/Saphir conditioner cream and polish

post #17239 of 19076
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajc2162 View Post
 

Hi WillisAu, I can see what you mean about more tan than mahogany. I like the colour though.

 

Might be a good idea to post your question in the Loake Appreciation thread - and tell them the actual models. For example, I presume the bottom two are from the 1880 line - Aldwych dark brown and Strand mahogany respectively.

 

Cheers, I don't mind the colour too much, but I would prefer if it was darker as it currently doesn't looks great with my darker suits. I'm not too concerned with matching to those exact colours on the other Loake shoes, just want to darken the shoes to that sort of region.   The models are the Cadogan and Strand btw, same last as Aldwych and both available in "mahogany".  I did post in the Loake thread, but it's kinda quiet over there ... :S

post #17240 of 19076

It is possible to glue a rubber sole protector-Topys- to a rubber sole.

 

The problem would be getting good adhesion. You need a very uniform surface with the sole protector in contact with the sole everywhere, not just at a few high points. That could require sanding down the rubber surface, which might detract from the life of the original sole. If the sole is fairly smooth, then maybe you could add the protector without losing too much. If it is deeply contoured, maybe wear them until the irregular surface wears flat where you tread, then sanding down the rest of the surface, and adding the sole protector??

 

It would probably make more sense to start with leather soles and add sole protectors to them.

post #17241 of 19076
I can't remember the last time I put a decent shine on a pair of shoes. Most of my shoes are a matte finish. I was cleaning these this weekend and got carried away. I actually treated these with Obenauf last winter with the record breaking snow. They shined right up with just a bit of effort.



post #17242 of 19076
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapasman View Post

Has anyone coloured light shell?.  I would like to do something with this pair.

Happy Thanksgiving to all my USA friends,

Those are lovely! They should darken with wear and exposure to sunlight. Unless you mean like dying them green or purple or something?
post #17243 of 19076

Thanks @peppercorn78, yes they are beautiful but I was thinking to dye them to become a bit darker (kind of light-mid brown).  How does shell ( non porous) gets the dyes?.  Why do you suggest green or purple colours?.

post #17244 of 19076
Hi There!

New to the forum and looking for a little advise on how to protect a new pair of winter boots I just picked up. They are made with a very smooth hard leather. And I live in a climate that gets lots of snow, slush, and salt in the winter. I've heard that Sno Seal and Obenauf's Heavy Duty LP are good. People in this thread rave about Saphir Shoe products. I'm wondering if they have anything that would work for me? Saphir Everest or Creme de Soins perhaps? Just not sure how well any of the "wax" based protectors will soak into this leather.

Any help is very much appreciated!

Pictures...





Thanks In Advance!!
Edited by MarcusD - 12/1/15 at 9:57pm
post #17245 of 19076

Hi guys, any idea on how to try fix these?
post #17246 of 19076
Quote:
Originally Posted by edwak View Post


Hi guys, any idea on how to try fix these?

That looks like corrected grain leather. If so, I don't think there's much you can do.
post #17247 of 19076
I've got a pair of shoes where the left shoe is just too short for my foot. The right shoe fits great. These are a pair of Allen Edmonds Carlyles -- a plain toe oxford. How much improvement could I expect by having them stretched?
post #17248 of 19076
Quote:
Originally Posted by mreams99 View Post

I've got a pair of shoes where the left shoe is just too short for my foot. The right shoe fits great. These are a pair of Allen Edmonds Carlyles -- a plain toe oxford. How much improvement could I expect by having them stretched?

 

Not much, you can't do too much in terms of making a shoe longer. I think the most you could do is stretch the heel further back

post #17249 of 19076

Hi all, could use some advice if anyone's got time :)

 

I'll start with the TLDR version and can provide more info/pics as needed.  Basically--picked up a pair of nice burgundy shoes, used Saphir products to polish (bordeaux/mahogany), but the toebox on one shoe ended up with kind of a dark streak, assumedly from use of the Bordeaux polish.  Used some Renomat to try and remove it to re-start the polishing process, but instead the dark spot spread and now basically covers the entire toe-box... it looks dark brown to almost black, next to the burgundy.  No idea if I've accidentally taken off the original finish/polish with the Renomat, or if it's a product of the purple color of the bordeaux saphir polish and I've accidentally antiqued the shoe or something.  Either way, I can't seem to get it back to the original burgundy color, and now I've got one shoe with a dark brown/black toebox, and one with a burgundy.

 

Any ideas how to reverse this?  I've been talking to Gabriel at Skoak about it but any other opinions would be helpful.  Sucks as I've only had this pair for less than a month and already messed it up!  Thanks all.

post #17250 of 19076

Just to lower the tone. Putting aside my Tricker's and Loake's for the moment, I bought a pair of Dr Martens, 4161, cherry red, Goodyear storm welted, thick rubber Air Wear soled, shoes.  Docs have a lengthy history in various subcultures in the UK, since they started being made in 1960. They are, of course, made of corrected grain leather. You wouldn't know it. Rather than being very shiny, they have an almost matt finish and don't crack across the vamp. What marks them out as Docs is the bright yellow stitching around the welt. Well stitched and with a leather lining, these are made to last. 

 

Doc Martens are better known for their boots, but the shoes are very comfortable, from the off.  At £95, I think they are a real bargain. Not everyday shoes, but nice as something a bit different, with jeans. The purists will hold their hands up in horror at shoes like this. That's OK. 

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