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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1149

post #17221 of 19038
If you only do one thing to your leather shoes should it be conditioning? Is there any Kiwi conditioner or is it only used for polishing? Kiwi is really easy to find in Portugal and I would rather buy it here than have to order something like Lexol or Saphir online.
post #17222 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Filipe View Post

If you only do one thing to your leather shoes should it be conditioning?

No.

Brushing/cleaning.
post #17223 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

Wearing good shoes, regularly, in very bad weather may not be too good for them. On the other hand, shoes are made to be worn!

I would suggest you leave them to dry out, then wipe them down with a damp cloth and give them a good brushing. You may not want to use Renovateur so often. Use a polish, when the shoes need it (perhaps once every two weeks), then rely on a good amount of brushing. Use Renovateur every six weeks to two months.  Patrick Booth used to recommend a weak solution of water and vinegar to remove salt stains. 

This is just one point of view. Obviously others may have different suggestions. 

Great - thanks for the response. Out of curiosity, you mentioned not using conditioner cleaner so often - whats the potential harm?
post #17224 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by decumulate View Post


Great - thanks for the response. Out of curiosity, you mentioned not using conditioner cleaner so often - whats the potential harm?

 

As DW suggests, above, it is better to stick to brushing and he is the expert on the thread. 

 

I'm not sure of any long-term problems with using a conditioner so often - I guess I am just quoting received knowledge from this site. Conditioning is usually something done fairly rarely.  I suspect that, using it everyday, might remove any patina that is building up. 

post #17225 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

As DW suggests, above, it is better to stick to brushing and he is the an expert on the thread. 

FTFY

Thank you for confidence but while I have decades of experience with leather, I make shoes. I don't necessarily have all that much better real, objective, experience...or interest...in how to maintain shoes than someone like pB, for instance.

He may be as close to the real expert here as anyone.
post #17226 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


FTFY

Thank you for confidence but while I have decades of experience with leather, I make shoes. I don't necessarily have all that much better real, objective, experience...or interest...in how to maintain shoes than someone like pB, for instance.

He may be as close to the real expert here as anyone.

 

I think you are being a bit disingenuous, here, DW!  Above, you advised someone to 'brush and clean' - advice about shoe care. You have also often posted messages about shoe care and I certainly see you as the expert here. If you make shoes, I would have thought that it is a given that you know how to look after them. It would be an odd relationship with a customer who asks you, 'how should I look after these new shoes?', if you replied, 'I don't know! I only make them!

 

I hope you are well. With best wishes, Munky. 

post #17227 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

I think you are being a bit disingenuous, here, DW!  Above, you advised someone to 'brush and clean' - advice about shoe care. You have also often posted messages about shoe care and I certainly see you as the expert here. If you make shoes, I would have thought that it is a given that you know how to look after them. It would be an odd relationship with a customer who asks you, 'how should I look after these new shoes?', if you replied, 'I don't know! I only make them!

I hope you are well. With best wishes, Munky. 

I don't know...I do draw a distinction between being an expert and being "the only voice of reason and a light in the darkness" (which I frequently am...on some subjects wink.gif ).

But of course,you're right. I have a great deal of experience in dealing with and maintaining leather and shoes. That said, I learned a lot from pB--he's researched it in far greater depth than I have. I miss him.

That said, thank you again...

And if it means anything to you over there...Happy Thanksgiving.
post #17228 of 19038

Has anyone coloured light shell?.  I would like to do something with this pair.

Happy Thanksgiving to all my USA friends,

post #17229 of 19038

Hi all,

So I've recently acquired a pair of Loake's which are "mahogany" however they seem lighter than what I was expecting, and closer to tan.  I was thinking about using Saphir Pommadier cream in a medium/dark brown or tobacco/havana to bring them down to the colour I was after.  I've attached photos of my shoes (top two), and a photo of the Loake 'mahogany' I was expecting (bottom two, yes I realise it's a different shoe), which is the colour I would like to get close to.  

Based on the polishing notes at the hanger project, I was thinking that the Tobacco/Havana cream would be best for my intent (I wouldn't mind if they ended up a bit darker than the other Loake's pictured)

 

- has anyone done this on a similarly coloured shoe, and maybe even has comparison pics?

 

Thanks

 

 

 

post #17230 of 19038

Hi WillisAu, I can see what you mean about more tan than mahogany. I like the colour though.

 

Might be a good idea to post your question in the Loake Appreciation thread - and tell them the actual models. For example, I presume the bottom two are from the 1880 line - Aldwych dark brown and Strand mahogany respectively.

post #17231 of 19038

i'm getting a pair of beater winter boots (i expect salt damage). 

it has a rubber half sole stitched on but I want to add a Topy because that would be cheaper than having to replace the stitched half sole and its not worth the cost of a half-sole resole for these

does anybody here have experience with Topying a rubber half sole?

post #17232 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by okayvin View Post
 

i'm getting a pair of beater winter boots (i expect salt damage). 

it has a rubber half sole stitched on but I want to add a Topy because that would be cheaper than having to replace the stitched half sole and its not worth the cost of a half-sole resole for these

does anybody here have experience with Topying a rubber half sole?

 

Unless you have already bought them, wouldn't it be easier (and probably better) to buy some shoes with rubber soles and heels?

post #17233 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

No.

Brushing/cleaning.

Thanks. Is there any Kiwi product that is a conditioner?
post #17234 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

 

Unless you have already bought them, wouldn't it be easier (and probably better) to buy some shoes with rubber soles and heels?

 

I imagine that full rubber soles are just as difficult to Topy, unless you are suggesting that I dispose of the shoes and get a new pair. But I was hoping for the boots to last as long as the leather holds up, not for only as long as the heels and soles hold up. Despite the salt damage, I expect the leather uppers to last longer than the rubber soles. 

post #17235 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by okayvin View Post
 

 

I imagine that full rubber soles are just as difficult to Topy, unless you are suggesting that I dispose of the shoes and get a new pair. But I was hoping for the boots to last as long as the leather holds up, not for only as long as the heels and soles hold up. Despite the salt damage, I expect the leather uppers to last longer than the rubber soles. 

 

You don't put Topys on full rubber soles and heels - they are already made of rubber! And the rubber is single unit made up of heel and sole. Have a look on the net, for Dainite soles, for an example. The same company make a much more heavy duty unit called Commando, too. 

 

In your message, you said that you were going to buy new shoes - future tense.  If you haven't bought them already, do consider the rubber soled and heel varieties. If you have bought them, already, it depends on what you paid for them and whether or not you can afford another pair. From the point of view of their being winter shoes, you need to consider if the uppers are fit for 'weather'.

 

I'm sorry to be a big gloomy but I hope this helps!  Munky

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