or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1141

post #17101 of 19277
Quote:
Originally Posted by smoothie1 View Post

Bickmore Bick 4 is an excellent product. I use Bick 4 far more often than Lexol. I use Lexol more often than Renovateur. Btw, Renovateur is a cleaner and conditioner, so its effects are a bit different than the others in my experience.

Lexol is very effective and useful in its own right, but it is not as light or as easy to work wth as Bick 4.

It's nice to have all three at your disposal.

To me B4 and Lexol are almost the same. My advise would be to buy the cheapest.

post #17102 of 19277

Video review of Saphir Cordovan Cream (it's great):

 

post #17103 of 19277
I received a pair of chromexel boots and it looks like there is a hole or two caused by an errant sewing needle. Would this affect the water resistance of the boot? Can I plug the hole with something like Sno seal? I'm just wondering if I can live with it or try to return it.

post #17104 of 19277
Unless they are hard to get, I'd return them. There are things that come from being handmade and seconds: I think those are seconds.

I'll let more knowledgeable folks answer your actual question.
post #17105 of 19277
Quote:
Originally Posted by Odd I/O View Post

I received a pair of chromexel boots and it looks like there is a hole or two caused by an errant sewing needle. Would this affect the water resistance of the boot? Can I plug the hole with something like Sno seal? I'm just wondering if I can live with it or try to return it.


Are those Vibergs? If so, I can understand the reluctance to return them given how hard they are to source. Personally I would return them, however. It's not even a performance issue- they should not have been sold as firsts.
post #17106 of 19277

Hi there, I'm new to this thread and a total newbe on deeper issues of shoe care beyond polishing, so I am throwing this out for comments. I am wanting a pair of brown Allen Edmonds Chester. Seems they made some, but most were in merlot and black and I have each. Since the Chester was discontinued long ago, I am looking to buy a used pair and try to change them to brown. I welcome comments on this possible project and which color would be most amenable to a color change? I assume it is the merlot. If this is practical, I would like to hear suggestions on cleaning, stripping and changing the color. Brands, procedures and specific products would be most welcome. Feel free to show pictures of any black to brown or merlot to brown you have done with success. Thanks in advance for responding and any advice, even if it is "Don't even try."

post #17107 of 19277

^Feel free to check out the shoe antiquing thread. Lots of great tutorials and examples there from Ron Rider. 

 

Side note:

 

I usually clean my horse hair welt brushes after a polishing session to get the dried cream off. Soap and water, some shampoo to finish it off. I did the same thing last night except with my shine brush and saw a surprising amount of brown murky soap-water come out. Either way, all that excess cream and wax and whatnot is out, and the softness of the bristles is back. 

 

This is how I usually clean my brushes:

 

  1. Ensure bristles are wet by running hot tap water over the brush. I like to run it for at least 30 seconds or so just to make sure the bristles get water everywhere and even heat up a little. 
  2. Squeeze some dish soap into the palm of my hand, put a little bit of water in my hand, and then rub the brush in circles into the soap on my palm. 
  3. Clean off brush and rinse the soap off. 
  4. With the bristles facing the ceiling, pour some soap directly into the bristles. 
  5. Using your fingers, get down deep into the bristles and move your fingers in circles. This should help break apart the clumps of cream or wax at the root of the brush. 
  6. Run brush under hot water while continuing to move fingers in cirlces. 
  7. If you want the brush to dry faster, use a towel and rub the brush with it as if it were your shoes. The water will flow off the brush suprisingly quickly. Otherwise leave out to dry. 

 

That just about does it for me. This way the bristles don't become hard and scratch the leather when I'm applying Renovateur or cream or anything like that. It also helps the cream spread evenly rather than smear in globs. 

post #17108 of 19277
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbhan12 View Post
 

^Feel free to check out the shoe antiquing thread. Lots of great tutorials and examples there from Ron Rider. 

 

Side note:

 

I usually clean my horse hair welt brushes after a polishing session to get the dried cream off. Soap and water, some shampoo to finish it off. I did the same thing last night except with my shine brush and saw a surprising amount of brown murky soap-water come out. Either way, all that excess cream and wax and whatnot is out, and the softness of the bristles is back. 

 

This is how I usually clean my brushes:

 

  1. Ensure bristles are wet by running hot tap water over the brush. I like to run it for at least 30 seconds or so just to make sure the bristles get water everywhere and even heat up a little. 
  2. Squeeze some dish soap into the palm of my hand, put a little bit of water in my hand, and then rub the brush in circles into the soap on my palm. 
  3. Clean off brush and rinse the soap off. 
  4. With the bristles facing the ceiling, pour some soap directly into the bristles. 
  5. Using your fingers, get down deep into the bristles and move your fingers in circles. This should help break apart the clumps of cream or wax at the root of the brush. 
  6. Run brush under hot water while continuing to move fingers in cirlces. 
  7. If you want the brush to dry faster, use a towel and rub the brush with it as if it were your shoes. The water will flow off the brush suprisingly quickly. Otherwise leave out to dry. 

 

That just about does it for me. This way the bristles don't become hard and scratch the leather when I'm applying Renovateur or cream or anything like that. It also helps the cream spread evenly rather than smear in globs. 

 

I've only 'washed' my horsehair brush once - after it accumulates too much oil and cannot no longer to be used to buff/raise a shine.  Been using the same brushes for more than a decade now.

post #17109 of 19277

Due to careless eating, I got a stain on my grained (tan) boots; bacon, avocado and tomato, but mostly avocado, I think.  Remembering what I'd read here, I tried the white vinegar/water mixture.  Having never had to do this before, I was careful and only rubbed lightly.  After three treatments, the stain is gone!  I just now have to use some Bick4 or Lexol to even things out a bit.

 

I have to thank @patrickBOOTH , who has given that advice countless times on this thread that I couldn't help but remember it.

post #17110 of 19277
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post
 

 

I've only 'washed' my horsehair brush once - after it accumulates too much oil and cannot no longer to be used to buff/raise a shine.  Been using the same brushes for more than a decade now.

Never in my life washed my horsehair brushes. I think time has come!!:nodding:

 

Thanks @rbhan12 to push me to do so.

post #17111 of 19277
Hey guys,

Please see picture. How do I get rid of the scuff mark?

post #17112 of 19277
Quote:
Originally Posted by 7_rocket View Post

Hey guys,

Please see picture. How do I get rid of the scuff mark?

 

A bit of polish and lots of brushing, for a few days. I keep scratching my shoes with my finger nails and the scratches soon disappear. The alternative option is to do nothing. Just follow your usual shoe cleaning schedule. 

post #17113 of 19277
Quote:
Originally Posted by 7_rocket View Post

Hey guys,

Please see picture. How do I get rid of the scuff mark?

I would try Lexol.

post #17114 of 19277
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

I've only 'washed' my horsehair brush once - after it accumulates too much oil and cannot no longer to be used to buff/raise a shine.  Been using the same brushes for more than a decade now.

Do you use a dauber brush for cream/conditioner or a cloth? I use a dauber/welt brush for creams. I couldn't imagine why I never washed them before. I noticed my horsehair brush was a little "harder" or "rougher" than I would have liked. I could feel some hairs being clumped together just by running my hand over it, particularly in the middle of the brush.

Simply put, the bristles get stuck together and turn hard because of the dried cream, especially on a welt brush.
post #17115 of 19277
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapasman View Post

Never in my life washed my horsehair brushes. I think time has come!!nod%5B1%5D.gif

Thanks @rbhan12 to push me to do so.

Awesome! Are you going to be cleaning just your shine brush or welt/dauber brushes as well? Either way, I'm sure you'll be as surprised as I was when you see the soap bubbles turn murky and chunks of dried cream/wax fall out.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**