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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1140

post #17086 of 19848

So I bought a pair of older 'Lexington' cap-toe bluchers for the express purpose of experimentation. 

 

I plan to:

 

1. Sand down sole edges and refinish antiqued

2. Burnishing the heel and toe areas

 

My question is, what other things should I consider? Remember, these aren't shoes I wear and really don't ever have to be, so nothing is off the table.

 

 

 

 

 

post #17087 of 19848

A couple questions:



 



A guy I know bought some AE McTavishes and has been wearing them a bit heavily (3x a week).  He posted a pic and I noticed this:





 



He says it is clear in person, but neither my pair of McT's (waxed tan and cognac) have anything at the welt stitch at all.  It doesn't look like he's cleaning them and they are relatively new (about a month).  Thoughts on what this is and what might be done?  (I suggested brushing to start)




Other question: is there any kind of maintenance that is done for the interior leather, specifically at the heel? I'm seeing a bit of wear there, and wondering if I can do anything to extend the life of the leather short of putting some kind of pad there (not thrilled at that concept). I don't have any heel slip that I notice in any of these shoes, I do use a shoe tree, etc. Think I just have pointy heels... smile.gif
post #17088 of 19848

Remember a little while ago I dyed my new pair of cheapy Ikon Oslo boots from tan to dark chocolate brown?-

 

 

Well I got bored of the tan of my old pair so I decided to have a go at painting a vintage style patina using a more diluted version of the dye/Lexol mix.  What do you think?-

post #17089 of 19848
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnglishShoes View Post

Remember a little while ago I dyed my new pair of cheapy Ikon Oslo boots from tan to dark chocolate brown?-




Well I got bored of the tan of my old pair so I decided to have a go at painting a vintage style patina using a more diluted version of the dye/Lexol mix.  What do you think?-


I think I need you to do a pair for me!
post #17090 of 19848
The vintage job looks great!
post #17091 of 19848
Quote:
Originally Posted by shoelover View Post


I think I need you to do a pair for me!


It was dead easy!

 

Plus, I only used acetone, oil dye and lexol.  (Plus some trusty old Saphir cream and wax at the end)

 

Give it a go :)

post #17092 of 19848

Latest shoe-care haul.

 

post #17093 of 19848

Lexol or Revenateur?

post #17094 of 19848
Quote:
Originally Posted by shoelover View Post
 

Lexol or Revenateur?


Me?

 

I mixed the dye with Lexol.  Lexol penetrates into the leather much deeper than the Renovateur so you get a better take-up.  Using neat dye is tricky as is soak straight in and it difficult to control.

post #17095 of 19848
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnglishShoes View Post
 


Me?

 

I mixed the dye with Lexol.  Lexol penetrates into the leather much deeper than the Renovateur so you get a better take-up.  Using neat dye is tricky as is soak straight in and it difficult to control.


I just bought both products, because I have heard great things about both. I was asking in general what everyone prefers.

post #17096 of 19848
Quote:
Originally Posted by shoelover View Post
 


I just bought both products, because I have heard great things about both. I was asking in general what everyone prefers.

 

I'm a fan of both those products.  (I've got some Bick4 on order too)

 

Lexol is more penetrating but leaves more of a sticky residue in my experience.  If the leather is old and has never been conditioned, I would use some Lexol first.  If the leather is generally in good condition I would use Renovateur as its much nicer to work with IMO.  I always use a layer of Renovateur on brand new shoes before anything else.

 

I end up using Lexol perhaps once a year and Reno about once a month.

post #17097 of 19848
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnglishShoes View Post
 

 

I'm a fan of both those products.  (I've got some Bick4 on order too)

 

Lexol is more penetrating but leaves more of a sticky residue in my experience.  If the leather is old and has never been conditioned, I would use some Lexol first.  If the leather is generally in good condition I would use Renovateur as its much nicer to work with IMO.  I always use a layer of Renovateur on brand new shoes before anything else.

 

I end up using Lexol perhaps once a year and Reno about once a month.


Thanks for the explanation. I used both today and the Lexol seems kinda like what my dad used to put on my ball glove. The Renovator certainly IS easier to work with, but the Lexol seemed to really penetrate my Rutledges. That may be because of the more supple leather, but it made them look very healthy.

post #17098 of 19848
For me, Bick4 replaced both of these products. Much more versatile IMHO.
post #17099 of 19848
Bickmore Bick 4 is an excellent product. I use Bick 4 far more often than Lexol. I use Lexol more often than Renovateur. Btw, Renovateur is a cleaner and conditioner, so its effects are a bit different than the others in my experience.

Lexol is very effective and useful in its own right, but it is not as light or as easy to work wth as Bick 4.

It's nice to have all three at your disposal.
post #17100 of 19848
Renovateur is best used for spit shined toe caps or other high wax polished products.
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