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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1132

post #16966 of 19044
I think you are conflating "hydrogen bonds" with "any bond involving hydrogen". Two different things. There can be strong bonds involving hydrogen. The bond with fluorine is an example. But these are covalent bonds, not hydrogen bonds.
post #16967 of 19044

Hey all,

I am in the unfortunate position of having to remove the smell of vomit from suede shoes. Luckily all stains have been removed but the smell lingers. What would be the safest and most effective way to remove this?

post #16968 of 19044
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt1994 View Post
 

Hey all,

I am in the unfortunate position of having to remove the smell of vomit from suede shoes. Luckily all stains have been removed but the smell lingers. What would be the safest and most effective way to remove this?

 

Not tried this myself but have you considered Febreze? Id test it first though perhaps on the tongue just in case.

post #16969 of 19044
Quote:
Originally Posted by M635Guy View Post

In addition to the product noted above, for water resistance you can also consider Saphir Invulner, which is pricey, but definitely non-silicone and stated to be safe for suedes and standard leathers.  Lots of folks like the Tarrago Nano spray as well.  

No silicone in the Vectra at all.
post #16970 of 19044
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainTohm View Post

Y'know what? I'm just gonna leave my suedes alone and keep them out of the rain. I didn't go to a liberal arts school just to get exposed to this much science.

It's best to use an effective product rather than nothing.
I can't tell you how often customers bring in suede footwear damaged from the unexpected.
They tell me that they "didn't plan on wearing these in the rain but we got an unexpected rainfall".
More common than that is they were out at a restaurant an some food or drink accidentally spilled on them.

Just something to consider.....
post #16971 of 19044
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick V. View Post

It's best to use an effective product rather than nothing.
I can't tell you how often customers bring in suede footwear damaged from the unexpected.
They tell me that they "didn't plan on wearing these in the rain but we got an unexpected rainfall".
More common than that is they were out at a restaurant an some food or drink accidentally spilled on them.

Just something to consider.....

I was simply being an ass, but point well taken. It's not truly a Friday night unless I'm at risk of spilling a drink on my shoes.
post #16972 of 19044
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt1994 View Post
 

Hey all,

I am in the unfortunate position of having to remove the smell of vomit from suede shoes. Luckily all stains have been removed but the smell lingers. What would be the safest and most effective way to remove this?

 

Wow - that's terrible...

 

I'd try Saphir Omni'Nettoyant Suede Shampoo - it's a pretty thorough bath for your suede.  Not sure what else to tell you - I'm sure there are better folks to give you help than me.  

 

For the future, note some of the waterproofing products mentioned above...

post #16973 of 19044
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick V. View Post


No silicone in the Vectra at all.

 

I figured, but thought I'd make sure.  Just got my Invulner in the mail, so going to try that on some of my shoes.

post #16974 of 19044
Quote:
Originally Posted by M635Guy View Post

I figured, but thought I'd make sure.  Just got my Invulner in the mail, so going to try that on some of my shoes.

Excellent product as well. Try to use it in a ventilated area.
post #16975 of 19044
Saddle soap pH will be tested today, and I'll begin the acid-base experiment with the strip of vegetable tanned leather today as well.

Stay tuned!
post #16976 of 19044

Hi all, 

 

Thanks Nick for being kind enough to send me a tin of Meltonian Saddle Soap. 

 

I took about a gram and put in in about 250 grams of deionized water, stirred it around pretty well and tried to get as much to dissolve in the water as possible. As you can see in the photo, there's still some big chunks of soap, so clearly not everything dissolved in the water. 

 

Attached are photos of the solution, a sample of it in the pH meter, the pH strip testing, and another sample in the pH meter. 


 

Saddle Soap pH Results (Click to show)

 

 

 

 

In summary, the saddle soap did not completely dissolve in water. Despite the soap not being entirely dissolved in water, the pH came out to about 9.7, comfortably on the basic side.

 

Acid and base testing of leather is ongoing, and I'll report back after about a week or so. 

post #16977 of 19044
This thread is awesome great work by all the members conributing. Takes it to all new level.
post #16978 of 19044
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbhan12 View Post

Saddle soap pH will be tested today, and I'll begin the acid-base experiment with the strip of vegetable tanned leather today as well.

Stay tuned!

No prob....pleasure to help.
Thanks for taking the time to preform these tests.
post #16979 of 19044
Very nice.

I think saddle soap doesn't complete dissolve in water due to its high oil content.
post #16980 of 19044
great, thanks for doing this!
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