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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1116

post #16726 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stigland View Post

But it's not the colour I want, it's still too red-ish even after I apply several layers of the polish and cream. Is the only way to achive a red-free hue to recolour? Or is black cream still a viable option?

Experiment is your friend. No one knows a definitive answer unless they work on the same batch of shoes before.

Best case, dark brown and dark green creams will cover and dilute most of the red hue. For pigmented substances, green + red = brown.

Worst case, strip the finish clean and add dark colored cream yourself.
post #16727 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stigland View Post
 

Any good resources on patina jobs? I'd like to be well read before I do something like that (would be reeeealy fun though).

You can check out the shoe antiquing thread. http://www.styleforum.net/t/45530/shoe-antiquing/405#post_8103843

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beach Bum View Post

Can someone link to a page or post or source for great information on how to polish and maintain Shell Cordovan boots? So many hits come up when searching but thought there may be a good concensus for top advice.

I may be buying a pair that will be my first. Thanks.


Can't find one but I user either reno or veneitan leather balm, deer polishing bone, cordovan cream, and wax... and lot's of brushing.

post #16728 of 19067

Just out of curiosity, what is everyone using to remove old wax for the means of conditioning shoes and applying a fresh coat of polish? I've used numerous products, but want to know what you guys are up to. 

post #16729 of 19067
Renomat, or orange oil.
post #16730 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by garland View Post
 

Just out of curiosity, what is everyone using to remove old wax for the means of conditioning shoes and applying a fresh coat of polish? I've used numerous products, but want to know what you guys are up to. 

 

renomat or saddle soap is my go to but this of course depends on the type of leather you're working with.

post #16731 of 19067
Saphir Renomat, but I rarely use it ofter than once a year.
post #16732 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stigland View Post
 

Any good resources on patina jobs? I'd like to be well read before I do something like that (would be reeeealy fun though).

Check out this thread.

http://www.styleforum.net/t/45530/shoe-antiquing/15

post #16733 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Renomat, or orange oil.

 

interesting. any specific orange oil? 

post #16734 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Renomat, or orange oil.

By the way PB I'd like to express my gratitude for the vinegar tip you gave. I had some badly beer stained Rosewood calf shoes, so using your advice soaked kitchen towel in 1 part vinegar to 2 parts water placed it over the stains and left them over night.

 

When I removed the towel this morning, stains completely gone, not a trace. Magic.

 

Many thanks!!

post #16735 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by jokb View Post

renomat or saddle soap is my go to but this of course depends on the type of leather you're working with.
Fuck people, stop using saddle soap!
Quote:
Originally Posted by garland View Post

interesting. any specific orange oil? 
d-limonene. Hardware stores usually carry it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stemo79 View Post

By the way PB I'd like to express my gratitude for the vinegar tip you gave. I had some badly beer stained Rosewood calf shoes, so using your advice soaked kitchen towel in 1 part vinegar to 2 parts water placed it over the stains and left them over night.

When I removed the towel this morning, stains completely gone, not a trace. Magic.

Many thanks!!

I'm glad it worked for you!
post #16736 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


Fuck people, stop using saddle soap!
d-limonene. Hardware stores usually carry it.
I'm glad it worked for you!

 

Can you please explain the hate for saddle soap or renovating soap?

post #16737 of 19067
For the 40 millionth time in this thread, soaps are highly alkaline. Leather wants to be in a mildly acidic state or it gets brittle from the leaching out of tanning agents, which occurs when the fibers turn alkaline.
post #16738 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

For the 40 millionth time in this thread, soaps are highly alkaline. Leather wants to be in a mildly acidic state or it gets brittle from the leaching out of tanning agents, which occurs when the fibers turn alkaline.


Do you mean this even for the non-alkaline regenerating soap? I use saddle soap for rougher leathers. regenerating soap for st. C's crust and semi-aniline leather. Most fine leather gets renomat.

post #16739 of 19067
I have no idea what non-alkaline regenerating soap is, so maybe?

To be honest, I have no idea what the need is in general for stripping wax. If you routinely need to strip wax of your shoes you're applying too much/too frequently.
post #16740 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

For the 40 millionth time in this thread, soaps are highly alkaline. Leather wants to be in a mildly acidic state or it gets brittle from the leaching out of tanning agents, which occurs when the fibers turn alkaline.

Did you test the saddle soaps for pH or is your crusade against the word soap.
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