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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1110

post #16636 of 19043
Don't use Lexol after each coat, it's just going to strip the surface dye away and block the surface away from your next dye application.

Instead, dilute your dye with Lexol 1:1 or less. It will help bring the dye pigments into the leather and condition at the same time. Buff after every time the diluted dye is dry. Let them sit for a few hours to make sure the color settle otherwise it's very easy to over dye your color.

Cream and wax seal is more than enough. Even wax alone is enough if you dilute your dye with Lexol.
post #16637 of 19043
Well I've done it before without need to dilute the Lexol. Lexol is mostly water anyway, also if you dilute it be sure to use distilled water as the minerals in water can fuck shit up. Also, you're changing the ph the more you dilute, which in Lexol isn't optimal to begin with.
post #16638 of 19043
Tricks learned from leather workers.

pH? Meh. It's about dying shoes and making sure dye soaks in and settle. pH is the last thing you should worry about.

Lexol between layers of dye will strip the older layer and block the newer layer. Instead use Lexol (or Bick4) diluted dyes will help pigments soak in much more uniformly.
post #16639 of 19043
I think pH is the first thing you should worry about honestly. Ron Rider in his antiquing thread clearly states between layers you should condition to remove excess dye. He gets great results and so have I. Horses for courses.
post #16640 of 19043
You get way less excess dyes if you dilute your dye with Bick4. Less pigment applied all while Bick4 help them settle better.

The ingredient for your process and mine are exactly the same - dyes and conditioners. Hence negligible difference in impacting leather pH. Or, mine will impact to a lesser degree due to lesser dye used.

You use conditioners to remove excess dyes. I use conditioners to prevent excess dyes and help dye soak in.

Both methods conditions the leather, while yours only conditions and mine uses the condition process to set in dyes.

Oh, and not to mention that Bick4 diluted dyes spread better as well.

p.s., Bick4 > Lexol for this purpose. But the latter should do.
post #16641 of 19043
I hear you, but adding water to a conditioner affects pH pushing it more in the direction of a pH of 7, which isn't optimal.
post #16642 of 19043

Guys:

 

I was referred to this thread - and started at the beginning before I noticed it was 1100 pages.  I'm going to paste my other post here, and continue scanning the thread a bit.  If there's a good central repository of recommendations, I'd love to see it :)

 

Apologies in advance for a long post...

 

OK - so with my exploding Alden collection (not to mention a couple pairs of AE's), I've got some care and feeding questions with the various leathers.  I used to own a small company that made a polish and wax system for cars, and this feels a lot like that: a strong combination of process and product.  I'm pretty new to the shoe-game though - my approach to polishing shoes has been very simple in terms of products/process.  What I own has me asking some questions.

 

I looked around here for a shoe care thread, but I sorta suck at searching and I've got some fairly specific questions.  I don't see the shoe care post on AoC (though it generated some questions, one noted below), and the Alden site itself just has "coming soon..."

 

For equipment, I've got a couple of good horsehair large shoe brushes, and a bunch of smaller detail brushes/duabers, etc..  I'm using old t-shirts for cloths.  I have Alden Boot Cream (neutral), Bick 4, some Saphir Reno and their neutral paste (Pommadier Cream Shoe Polish).

 

I think my key questions boil down to how to work on/treat the welts, edging the various colors and what to use on the burnished tan calf, but here's the complete post:

 

Natty CXL Indys:

I've got some Alden Fine Boot Cream, and a jar of Saphir Reno.  Since I stomped around rainy Tokyo for over a week in these (8 wears or so) and wore them a few times before and since, I went ahead and hit them with the AFBC.  Maybe I need to spend more time with the brush on these shoes - the leather looks fine but feels slightly rough in places.  Does CXL benefit from extra time brushing?  I assume it is OK for the welt to get treated with a welt brush and some of the boot creme?

 

The sole is neocork with a lightly stained edge (antique?  looks more coffee to me) - I have some AE Neutral edge dressing.  Thoughts?

 

Burnished Tan Calf Boots: (on the way)  

I'd like to keep these somewhat matte in finish, so I was thinking the Saphir Pommadier Cream polish, but I'm concered about color.  I haven't seen the boots yet and I think they are more tan than the photo above, but in any case I'd like to avoid enhancing any red tone.  The folks at Hanger recommended the Cognac of Pommadier, but that leans red.  I could use the neutral, but I noticed on the AoC site somewhere that they specifically noted neutral cream shouldn't be used (though looking again it was mention in reference to shell).  Any thoughts on that?  I could just get the Alden tan polish, but guessing that is going to be waxy/shiny.  I'm prepared to live with that if I need to. Same question here on the edge - some  Walnut AE?  Neutral dressing?

 

Waxed Longwings:  

 

The is the second recent acquisition of a leather described as "waxed" - the other being AE McTavishes.  Saddle soap?  Thinking the AE walnut polish will work well on the edges for the Aldens.  Saddle soap is what AE recommends for the McTavshes, which also have a minimally-finished sole edge that I love:

Saddle soap and neutral edge for both?

 

Snuff Wingtip Boots:  

I think I'm ok here with just some of the Saphir suede spray (and maybe Invulner) and a good suede brush I already own.  Any other suede tips appreciated.  I just wish they'd be here before early Spring...

post #16643 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnglishShoes View Post
 

...I'm keen to recolour them to dark brown or black....

 

 

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v80), quality = 82

 

 

 

Ok here's where I'm at.

 

2 coats of pure dye (soaked in quickly!  Difficult to control without streaks)

2 coats of Lexol/dye mix (much easier to control)

 

I'm pretty pleased with the results so far.  I'm going to leave to fully dry for a day before any further work.  However, the finish is a little patchy around the sides/heel.  The 2nd pic was taken using a flash with exaggerates the finish.  The leather seems tighter in this area and the dye is not penetrating as much.  I might keep this finish, but wold you keep going at it?  The rest of the shoe would get darker and darker though I expect.  What do you think?

 

 

post #16644 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnglishShoes View Post

Quick update on this project  - the first application of Feibings oil dye is on and I'm pleased with the results so far.  I went for "dark chocolate" in the end.

Question - do I need to add some kind of sealer after my final dye coat?  
I have never felt the need to condition between each application of dye. (And I've worked with leather since I was about 10 years old. I'm not going to give away my age, but many people retire from their career with less experience.) Conditioner may prevent future dye applications from fully penetrating. I would wait until finishing with the dye, then apply a conditioner and cream polish.
I don't know if you used a water-based dye or not. Mixing a water-based dye with something like Lexol may be OK. I'm not sure how well an alcohol based dye would mix. (As I've said, I've never done this.)
post #16645 of 19043

When you guys talk about dyes, are you refering to coloured cream/wax or shoe leather dyes (tinctures) like those of Angelus?. I never felt the need to go with them but I am just curious.

post #16646 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapasman View Post

When you guys talk about dyes, are you refering to coloured cream/wax or shoe leather dyes (tinctures) like those of Angelus?. I never felt the need to go with them but I am just curious.
When I talk about a dye, I am talking about a leather dye (Fiebings). It is not something most people would use on a shoe. It would generally only be used to make a drastic and permanent change to a shoe color.
The vast majority of my experience with leather dyes comes from finishing raw leather items that I've worked, like a carved and tooled belt.
post #16647 of 19043

I finished my dye job!  Here are my new dark chocolate boots next to my old factory finish boots. 

 

What do you think?

 

post #16648 of 19043
Looks pretty good

Is there any dye transfer to your hands/socks/feet when wearing/touching them? Are they tacky to the touch at all?
post #16649 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnglishShoes View Post

I finished my dye job!  Here are my new dark chocolate boots next to my old factory finish boots. 

What do you think?


Good job!
post #16650 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by skeen7908 View Post

Looks pretty good

Is there any dye transfer to your hands/socks/feet when wearing/touching them? Are they tacky to the touch at all?

 

They have had a whole day after the final dye/lexol application and they don't feel tacky at all.  They have had lots of brushing to get any residue off.  They look a bit wet/shiny due to the brown cream and wax that I have just applied.

 

I'm interested to see how the colour holds.  I'm hoping these will be my wet weather/snow boots so they will be in for a real test!

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