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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1108

post #16606 of 19043

thanks:fonz:

post #16607 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by BackInTheJox View Post
 

Hi all,

Just picked up these AE Rutledge seconds, and unfortunately the burnishing on the brogued areas is way way overboard.  What are some good ways (if any) to help undo (or drastically reduce) this?  Someone on the AE suggested Saphir Reno, which I would consider.  Any other suggestions?  Cheaper would be better (I don't have Reno and would otherwise have no other use for it), but I'm open to suggestions.

 

Thanks!

 

 

 

 

 

Ok, so this morning I got a little antsy and decided to go ahead and give these a once over with some isopropyl alcohol and elbow grease (in the burnished areas).  Below are some pics (the lighting isn't identical to the original pics but you get the idea).  Obviously this is only my first go at it, and I will have to even the color out.  The photos are after I stripped much of the black color and then gave them a quick once-over with some AE cleaner/conditioner.  

 

I will continue to try to feather some of the burnishing so it all blends better, and then after some more conditioning, I am thinking of using some AE chili polish to slightly darken the leather and help it blend into the burnished areas.

 

First time having a go at this, so it's obviously not perfect.  Any suggestions/criticisms are welcome.

 

 

 

 

post #16608 of 19043

Suede Questions Please

 

I picked up a couple pair of suede shoes in the last few months, haven't worn them much, i.e. BB oxfords, J&M boots.  I bought some spray, also a brush with a little bar of what looks like soap, evidently to remove stains, from J&M.

 

I need advice on the initial care treatment.  Also, is it OK to use the wadded paper installed in the new shoes in place of shoe trees?  Can I just follow the instructions on the spray and be done with it?  I doubt these will be worn much, if at all, in inclement weather.  Should I take the products back to J&M and get something else?  I'm new at this.

 

Appreciate any comments, or link to a tutorial if already posted in this thread somewhere.  Thank you.

post #16609 of 19043
@BackInTheJox - it looks like a decent first attempt at stripping the color and burnishing.

Be sure to recondition the shoes when the stripping process is complete.

I think you'll have spectacular results, if you strip them a bit more. You may wish to employ another product as well. Others may have more informed suggestions about what to use to strip the color further. Best of luck.
post #16610 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by smoothie1 View Post

@BackInTheJox - it looks like a decent first attempt at stripping the color and burnishing.

Be sure to recondition the shoes when the stripping process is complete.

I think you'll have spectacular results, if you strip them a bit more. You may wish to employ another product as well. Others may have more informed suggestions about what to use to strip the color further. Best of luck.

 

Thanks.  I stripped a bit more, conditioned, and then just for kicks went over them with a single coat of chili polish.  Here's what they look like at the moment.

 

 

 

post #16611 of 19043
Nice and much improved. They'll look even better with a little wear and natural patina. The color and shading makes them look European.

Enjoy your new shoes!
post #16612 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by BackInTheJox View Post

Thanks.  I stripped a bit more, conditioned, and then just for kicks went over them with a single coat of chili polish.  Here's what they look like at the moment.









Looks like you should work for AE in the finishing department. The way they look now you can sell them as firsts! Very nice!
post #16613 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by BackInTheJox View Post

Thanks.  I stripped a bit more, conditioned, and then just for kicks went over them with a single coat of chili polish.  Here's what they look like at the moment. Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)







You've done a great job mate!
post #16614 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by bespoken pa View Post

Crat boldy taking galways where no man has before.....well done sir.
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

Oh the Blasphemy.

Galways on SF are worn with suits and slacks, cared daily, adored on shoe racks. How dare people wear country boots for hunting, shooting, or other country activities!

Those were my Connistons to be honest; I've never waded in my Galways (though I have taken them salt water fishing).

Quote:
Originally Posted by emptym View Post

Very nice.  Do they have bellows tongues?  AS make me a pair of blutcher boots w/ an extra high shaft and bellows tongue.  I had wanted the bellows to extend all the way to the top, but it ended where the vamp met the shaft.  I was kind of sad about it, but they were shell, so maybe that was the best that could be done.
Unfortunately not. I have other, more rugged boots that do but I was on a trip and needed something I could also wear in a smart casual setting. We had a Dutch Stijlforum meetup but I got told off for wearing unpolished shoes. Don't think a bellows tongue would have helped here btw.

Oh well, this is the damage. Time for some obenaufs.





post #16615 of 19043
Conistons look great @Crat. I obenauf'd my C&J Islay boots last winter and couldn't be more pleased with the additional weatherproofing. Excessive snow last year in Boston and every time I stepped off the sidewalk, I'd have to navigate ankle deep slush. HDLP added a nice barrier so the salty, slushy water wouldn't penetrate the leather.
post #16616 of 19043

Thanks again to the help/encouragement on here.  I tinkered a little more with the shoes, and here's what I'm left with as a final (for now, at least) results:

 

 

post #16617 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by BackInTheJox View Post
 

Thanks again to the help/encouragement on here.  I tinkered a little more with the shoes, and here's what I'm left with as a final (for now, at least) results:

 

 

 

Really great job!!! love the outcome :fistbump:  

 

Ps. give them some spit or mirror shine at the toe-heel area to give the color some more depth 

post #16618 of 19043
I was searing a venison roast to prepare it for the crock pot. A few drops of oil spatters got on each shoe. Now I've got small dark polka dots on my shoes.
Can these be removed?
post #16619 of 19043
The oil has absorbed into the porous leather.

I had a problem with an oil stain on marble once. Made a paste with Baking soda + water, applied it, and left it overnight covered with plastic wrap and it sucked out the oil.

Can a similar principle be applied here? Not sure that would damage it further..!
post #16620 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1up View Post

The oil has absorbed into the porous leather.

I had a problem with an oil stain on marble once. Made a paste with Baking soda + water, applied it, and left it overnight covered with plastic wrap and it sucked out the oil.

Can a similar principle be applied here? Not sure that would damage it further..!

Don't do this. Use a degreaser like renomat.
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