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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1105

post #16561 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Finished leather is acidic in nature. It is why the leather fibers form bonds with the tanning agents and remains flexible. Any sort of natural soap is highly alkaline relative to where finished leather is at its optimal point. Exposing leather that's finished with a pH between 3 and 5 to any soap which is has a pH of generally around 9 shifts the amphoteric protein fibers ionic negative, which makes it stiff and causes tanning agents to leach out of the leather.

http://nomanwalksalone.tumblr.com/post/122282765206/how-leather-is-made-and-why-it-is-important-by

The most important thing you can do for shoes is keep them clean and acidic.

Thats probably why the boot.com link says to use glycerin soap. The pH of glycerin is almost neutral, a bit acidic: http://chemistry.stackexchange.com/questions/7838/what-is-the-ph-of-1m-glycerol

Now obviously the rest of the ingredients may change that and it also seems that the Pears soap pictured has undergone some changes in formula after 2009 after staying the same from 1807 to 2009. Shame that is.
post #16562 of 19073
Crat boldy taking galways where no man has before.....well done sir.
post #16563 of 19073
the problem is the lye, not glycerin. But who the hell knows the lye content of saddle soaps of different brand?

I could get a pH testing stripe to test Saphir saddle soaps pH level but meh, whoever believes it's highly basic will remains so.
post #16564 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by bespoken pa View Post

Crat boldy taking galways where no man has before.....well done sir.

Oh the Blasphemy.

Galways on SF are worn with suits and slacks, cared daily, adored on shoe racks. How dare people wear country boots for hunting, shooting, or other country activities!
post #16565 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by tharkun View Post

Thats probably why the boot.com link says to use glycerin soap. The pH of glycerin is almost neutral, a bit acidic: http://chemistry.stackexchange.com/questions/7838/what-is-the-ph-of-1m-glycerol

Now obviously the rest of the ingredients may change that and it also seems that the Pears soap pictured has undergone some changes in formula after 2009 after staying the same from 1807 to 2009. Shame that is.

No, glycerin soap is a misnomer. Glycerin is just the byproduct of converting oils to soap. It is naturally present in ALL natural soap unless it is intentionally removed (which would be stupid). If natural soap is reverted to an acidic state the oils that were saponified into soap revert back into oils. The the alkalinity is what makes soap making possible.

In general, I have no idea why one would need to soap up their shoes with any form of saddle soap. Unless you're trying to clean work boots, there isn't much some distilled water and vinegar with a cloth can't handle. Even work boots caked with mud doesn't need saddle soap really. I think it is overkill. Also to willingly expose leather to something that can start a slow chemical reaction against the shoe's favor is plain willful ignorance.
post #16566 of 19073
Wrong post😊
post #16567 of 19073
Do you have a question about how to care for them?
post #16568 of 19073

I must say, I wasn't pleased with the effects of Reno on my Alden shell LHRs today. Seemed a bit, well, streaky... And now the surface seems to get smudged by fingerprints.

 

Perhaps I should just get one of those oily deer bones.

post #16569 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

No, glycerin soap is a misnomer. Glycerin is just the byproduct of converting oils to soap. It is naturally present in ALL natural soap unless it is intentionally removed (which would be stupid). If natural soap is reverted to an acidic state the oils that were saponified into soap revert back into oils. The the alkalinity is what makes soap making possible.

In general, I have no idea why one would need to soap up their shoes with any form of saddle soap. Unless you're trying to clean work boots, there isn't much some distilled water and vinegar with a cloth can't handle. Even work boots caked with mud doesn't need saddle soap really. I think it is overkill. Also to willingly expose leather to something that can start a slow chemical reaction against the shoe's favor is plain willful ignorance.

Actually that is what I've been told soap manufacturers do. They remove the glycerin from soap to put it into gels and such which they can sell for bigger markups as premium products. So yes, Pears having all the glycerin left in there might actually be "special". Although it seems that Unilever is changing the recipe again and again now, so who knows how much is really left in.

All that said I'm not even saying I'm going to put saddle soap on my dress shoes (never done so far although i do have a tin of Fiebings) but I like talkig about what's really wrong with it (or not) as there's so much unsubstantiated info out on the net. As such I want to thank you and chogall a lot for actually making references and explaining the "why" behind your viewpoints.
post #16570 of 19073
Gimme a few weeks to pull my lazy ass together to test the pH of saphir saddle soap.
post #16571 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crat View Post


This, with one small tweak.
To start with dont use shoe trees but newspaper. Stuff it into the boots tightly and replace it every few hours. You will notice how quickly it absorbs the moisture from the shoes. Wooden trees hill hold on to the moisture if the boots are drenched thus keeping the boots damp. Once the boots are moderately dry then use the trees. Dry somewhere away from a heat source where there is good air circulation. Since they have leather soles I would lay them on their sides to dry. Or is it dainite? Looks like dainite on my phone. If dainite then disregard the previous.

The upcoming tide trapped me on a sand bank the other day. I used the same procedure on my connistons, works fine. I've also previously used it on my poncified 82-last galways.



Very nice.  Do they have bellows tongues?  AS make me a pair of blutcher boots w/ an extra high shaft and bellows tongue.  I had wanted the bellows to extend all the way to the top, but it ended where the vamp met the shaft.  I was kind of sad about it, but they were shell, so maybe that was the best that could be done.

post #16572 of 19073
Typically rtw country boots only has bellowed tongue up to the vamp not all the way to the shaft.
post #16573 of 19073
I'm not subscribed to this thread any longer and I don't intend to get into a stramash...

That said, I'd dearly like to see an example of oxalic acid bleaching any finished leather...be it chrome or veg.

In my hands-on experience, and AFAIK, oxalic acid, at normal concentrations, will remove iron stains from veg tanned leathers but it cannot remove finishes or or lighten alcohol based dyes.

Take that experience for what it's worth...take some, take all, or take none at all.

No obligations.
post #16574 of 19073

Hello everybody!

 

Bought a pair of boots that kind of look and feel like cowboy boots (if it's any helpful information on the type of leather). They look like this: http://ccc.eu/en/woman/catalog/Lasocki/348546 They're the same brand.
I thought I'd add some beeswax before wearing them for the first time since it was raining, and they started darkening as if wet when I applied the product. The more I added the darker they got so fortunately I stopped right in time, but after 20 hours or so I still can see them darker where I applied the product. I am not sure if the beeswax helped with the water, it doesn't seem to create a protecting layer. They also had some sort of shine to them I think I just ruined.
So my question is how should I deal with this type of leather? What to do to protect them against water and rain? What kind of product would not darken my boots?

post #16575 of 19073
I have a pair of Rancourt Chromexcel Ranger Mocs with a decent scuff that I would like to use some shoe cream on. The question I have would it be Ok to use some regular Saphir cream or would it be best to use Saphir Greasy cream for Chromexcel? Basically Is Chromexcel that much different that I need a special cream on these type of shoes? What do you guys think?
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