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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1104

post #16546 of 19233

Thank you very much, Mono!  I can sleep again. :embar:

post #16547 of 19233
How do I lighten the color of suede boots? I have a pair of tan suede chelsea boots that unfortunately got very wet. The color of the suede has darken and the nap has got rougher. I would like the color to lighten just a little bit.
post #16548 of 19233
I've got this one pair wax-boiled leather brogues that can only be cleaned with saddle soap. Not the most refined shoes to look at, but good lord are they low maintenance.


Ah yes, actually I've got a question. Would you use a certain type of shoe tree for Alden LHS loafers or for driving moccasins? My usual trees seem a bit cramped in the loafers in particular.
Edited by BostonHedonist - 9/5/15 at 2:53pm
post #16549 of 19233
Quote:
Originally Posted by tharkun View Post

Apart from SC saying that its actually OK to use saddle soap and how to do it exactly, just think about it. When you use soap (lets say pure glycerin soap, like Pears) on your skin (leather), how is that so different? Well theres still a body attached to that leather to help replenish the skin/leather. And if it isn't, say in dry winters, we use lotions and cremes. Which is probably why saddle soap is not pure glycerin (although a pure glycerin soap might actually be much better than most other soaps people buy nowadays) but has other ingredients apart from glycerin and its why SC says its enough to care for the leather.

Another nice read on the topic is this one (scroll down a bit, although the question is on waterproofing the later paragraphs in the answer deal with glycerin and how to clean and care for the leather https://www.boot.com/bfaq1.shtml#SnowSeal

Well put that man -so many poor leather treatments out there - think I've encountered most of them and still don't put total store in any one as each leather is different I find.
post #16550 of 19233
Any recommendations with regards to what polish I should be using on chromexcel? Does it need to be anything specifically for chromexcel or will the normal shoe polish or cream work just as well and if not why?
post #16551 of 19233
The man at Horween is active on here and will answer that much better than I can - I only use English Leathers I'm afraid.
post #16552 of 19233
Quote:
Originally Posted by dddrees View Post

Any recommendations with regards to what polish I should be using on chromexcel? Does it need to be anything specifically for chromexcel or will the normal shoe polish or cream work just as well and if not why?

I think most would recommend Venetian shoe cream.
post #16553 of 19233
Quote:
Originally Posted by peppercorn78 View Post

I think most would recommend Venetian shoe cream.

I've been using this, however in this case because of the nature of the latest scuff I need to add a bit of brown color this time.
post #16554 of 19233
Just received a new pair of carminas (http://www.skoaktiebolaget.se/collections/uk-7/products/carmina-autumn-brogue) and around/inside the broguing as well as the wingtip there's lots of black colored residue. I'm guessing its some type of glue? Is there any way to remove or minimize this black residue? Thanks
post #16555 of 19233
Quote:
Originally Posted by tharkun View Post

Apart from SC saying that its actually OK to use saddle soap and how to do it exactly, just think about it. When you use soap (lets say pure glycerin soap, like Pears) on your skin (leather), how is that so different? Well theres still a body attached to that leather to help replenish the skin/leather. And if it isn't, say in dry winters, we use lotions and cremes. Which is probably why saddle soap is not pure glycerin (although a pure glycerin soap might actually be much better than most other soaps people buy nowadays) but has other ingredients apart from glycerin and its why SC says its enough to care for the leather.

Another nice read on the topic is this one (scroll down a bit, although the question is on waterproofing the later paragraphs in the answer deal with glycerin and how to clean and care for the leather https://www.boot.com/bfaq1.shtml#SnowSeal

Finished leather is acidic in nature. It is why the leather fibers form bonds with the tanning agents and remains flexible. Any sort of natural soap is highly alkaline relative to where finished leather is at its optimal point. Exposing leather that's finished with a pH between 3 and 5 to any soap which is has a pH of generally around 9 shifts the amphoteric protein fibers ionic negative, which makes it stiff and causes tanning agents to leach out of the leather.

http://nomanwalksalone.tumblr.com/post/122282765206/how-leather-is-made-and-why-it-is-important-by

The most important thing you can do for shoes is keep them clean and acidic.
post #16556 of 19233
I don't disagree with you with the acidity concerns. However a quick wash with saddle soap isn't the same as soaking them in basic solution and is not likely to alter the pH level as exaggerated as it might suggest.
post #16557 of 19233

I''v got a pair of Edward Green Galways and on the right shoe the crease is really digging into my big toe on the top side close to the 'knuckle'. I know in hindsight i should have gone for half a size smaller but Edward Green has a crap selection to try on instore and i took a gamble. i'v tried experimenting with different sized socks and insoles but its not really helping.

The creases are quite 'deep' which is the source of the problem, does anyone have any ideas? (i'v worn the boots about 7-10 times now and was hoping i'd break into them by now)

post #16558 of 19233
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

I don't disagree with you with the acidity concerns. However a quick wash with saddle soap isn't the same as soaking them in basic solution and is not likely to alter the pH level as exaggerated as it might suggest.
I disagree with you, but if there is a better option why bother with saddle soap?
post #16559 of 19233
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I disagree with you, but if there is a better option why bother with saddle soap?

I found Saphir saddle soap is an lighter cleaner than Lexol ph neutral cleaner. But it's just me. I use the former for quick wash and the latter if im making the shoes soaking wet.

Just some firsthand experience.
post #16560 of 19233
Quote:
Originally Posted by snuff_daddy View Post

How do I lighten the color of suede boots? I have a pair of tan suede chelsea boots that unfortunately got very wet. The color of the suede has darken and the nap has got rougher. I would like the color to lighten just a little bit.

Suede cleaners/washes usually lightens up suede colors slightly.

If it's really light tan color suede, discoloration from water damage is not salvageable.

Maybe you could try using oxalic salt/acid for bleaching but I've only used them on calf not suede.
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