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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1088

post #16306 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by benhour View Post

its the waxes (in this cases bees wax) that cracking off making the effect of "dusting" (make creasing areas look lighter)! Nothing to worry about!! just brush and with time it ll go away!

hope i helped a little bit happy.gif

I figured it was nothing but what can I use instead and avoid this issue?
post #16307 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by sinnedk View Post


I figured it was nothing but what can I use instead and avoid this issue?

Use bick4 or lexol sparingly every few months (or any conditioner cleaner)

 

Saphir is for dress shoes and their products give shines, even renovateur 

post #16308 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaywhyy View Post

Use bick4 or lexol sparingly every few months (or any conditioner cleaner)

Saphir is for dress shoes and their products give shines, even renovateur 

So do I just spray them with bick4 or lexol and that's it? No need to brush?

What about otter wax leather oil!
post #16309 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by sinnedk View Post


So do I just spray them with bick4 or lexol and that's it? No need to brush?

What about otter wax leather oil!

I'd brush before and after every wear especially along creases and feather. Dust and grit stuck in the creases is what cracks leather. I just put on a dab of bick4 on a rag and rub it in when leather feels a little dry. 

 

No experience with otter wax. 

post #16310 of 19038

I have never really worked out how to use Lexol. Do you use it in the way that might use cream; a very little rubbed in? Or do you pour a bit onto a cloth and wipe it all over the shoe?

post #16311 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by sinnedk View Post


So do I just spray them with bick4 or lexol and that's it? No need to brush?

What about otter wax leather oil!

Otter Oil Wax? Sounds good.  No waxes in it?

post #16312 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapasman View Post

Otter Oil Wax? Sounds good.  No waxes in it?

its this http://www.amazon.com/Leather-Oil-All-Natural-Conditioning-Treatment/dp/B005PS4XQY/ref=sr_1_13?ie=UTF8&qid=1437925579&sr=8-13&keywords=otter+wax+oil



company name is otter wax but their oil seems to be just oil.
post #16313 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by sinnedk View Post


its this http://www.amazon.com/Leather-Oil-All-Natural-Conditioning-Treatment/dp/B005PS4XQY/ref=sr_1_13?ie=UTF8&qid=1437925579&sr=8-13&keywords=otter+wax+oil



company name is otter wax but their oil seems to be just oil.

Yeah, I checked it before but I have never heard of it before.  Do you like it?

post #16314 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

I have never really worked out how to use Lexol. Do you use it in the way that might use cream; a very little rubbed in? Or do you pour a bit onto a cloth and wipe it all over the shoe?

For shoe care, more is more.

Just pour liberally onto a cloth, test on conspicuous spot to make sure no discoloration, then smear all over your shoes. Wait dry or over night for absorption then buff.

Oh, and they are excellent leather dye base as well. Mix them with leather dye and paint away. They help leather dye penetrate deeper. And after dying, they could also be used as lubricant to remove the excess pigments.
post #16315 of 19038

Thanks for that, Chogall, it's very helpful. 

post #16316 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post



For shoe care, more is more.

Just pour liberally onto a cloth, test on conspicuous spot to make sure no discoloration, then smear all over your shoes. Wait dry or over night for absorption then buff.

I agree with the above for conditioners. Seems to be contrary to alot of SF advice, but it works. For creams and polish I prefer to add a little at a time though.
post #16317 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

Yes, OS Brush Up is very expensive, but it's good and it's great for conditioning. It polishes up to a nice, deep shine, too. As with all of these types of 'alternative' products, it really is important to test them out before you use them on light-coloured shoes. They will, for example, sometimes darken tan shoes. 

 

I did buy some Lexol but haven't used it very much. It just seems to sit on the shelf. I know there are many who know very, very much more about shoes than I do and  who recommend it. I did look into Bic 4 but (as I remember) I couldn't get it in the UK.

 

I tend to stick to brushing, with occasional use of Brush Up and very occasional use of Saphir, coloured, cream. For me, the most important thing is the brushing. 

I bought it here in case you're interested in giving it a try.

http://www.healthyeurope.co.uk/bickmore-bick-4-leather-conditioner-16-ounce/?setCurrencyId=2

 

Felix

post #16318 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by benhour View Post

its the waxes (in this cases bees wax) that cracking off making the effect of "dusting" (make creasing areas look lighter)! Nothing to worry about!! just brush and with time it ll go away!

hope i helped a little bit happy.gif

What about the black saphir cream would that get the job done or same effect?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapasman View Post

Yeah, I checked it before but I have never heard of it before.  Do you like it?

Haven't tried but another member recommended it to me said it got the job done.
post #16319 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post




For shoe care, more is more.

Just pour liberally onto a cloth, test on conspicuous spot to make sure no discoloration, then smear all over your shoes. Wait dry or over night for absorption then buff.

Oh, and they are excellent leather dye base as well. Mix them with leather dye and paint away. They help leather dye penetrate deeper. And after dying, they could also be used as lubricant to remove the excess pigments.

I also have use it for streching my shoes and for the linings.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jerrybrowne View Post


I agree with the above for conditioners. Seems to be contrary to alot of SF advice, but it works. For creams and polish I prefer to add a little at a time though.

+1

post #16320 of 19038

Gentlemen:

 

Since AE leather shoes are made of animals' skin.  Would it be a good idea to apply hand cream or skin protectant on leather shoes (like AE PA) for better protection, etc.?  I applied hand cream on my leather wallet before, it seems to restore its health a bit.  At that time, I didn't have any shoe care products.  But now I have AE shoe polish, leather conditioner, lotion, etc.  Thus, my question boil down to:

 

hand cream or skin protectant for human skin vs. specially-formulated lotion/cream for shoe leathers

 

Just want to get your opinion and insights on this.

 

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