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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1077

post #16141 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


As an alternative you could purchase a home repair jack--they're a dime a dozen on Ebay.

Bick4 is not the ticket---there are emollients and oils in Bick4 that would destroy the type of bond (friction) you're trying to create between the leather and the peg.

Few waists don't have hollows underneath the outsole.

No. When the leather is moist all the way through it swells up and the fibers are pushed apart. As it dries the moisture migrates out of the leather leaving those spaces between the fibers. When the leather is in just the right state*, you can firmly hammer the leather, shaping and compressing those fibers down around the peg. You can compress the fibers into a smaller and denser mat than it was when it came from the tannery (usually...depends on how many times and how firmly it was rolled).

 
*If the leather is too wet, moisture will migrate from the leather to the pegs causing them to swell pushing the fibers aside. Usually the leather will dry before the peg and thus hammering the leather around a wet peg is near-as-nevermind useless.

If the leather is too dry, hammering the will not compress the leather much if at all.

edited for punctuation and clarity

 

What's the best way to keep the leather/pegs moist if not w/ Bick4?  Vinegar infused water @patrickBOOTH style or some crazy oil @traverscao style?

 

My conjecture is/was the soles weren't properly finished with enough wax coating burnished...

post #16142 of 19072

Hi guys, 

 

What's the best way to treat this? Can I put some brown polish on it to make it less visible? I was told by the shoemaker that the scar mark should not further deteriorate. These are seconds and are bought at a really good price, with the help of a generous member on SF. 

 

 

 

post #16143 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by JezeC View Post

Hi guys, 

What's the best way to treat this? Can I put some brown polish on it to make it less visible? I was told by the shoemaker that the scar mark should not further deteriorate. These are seconds and are bought at a really good price, with the help of a generous member on SF. 


That's a crack in the grain surface/finish. It 's not a scar--a scar implies healing. It may not get worse if there is no pressure along the topline. Or it may. A great deal of the tensile strength is in the grain.
post #16144 of 19072

So my best bet is brown polish right? Thanks for your comments. 

post #16145 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by JezeC View Post
 

So my best bet is brown polish right? Thanks for your comments. 

 

Clean them, use leather repair compound to fill in the tear/crack, sand it using high grid sandpaper, then shoe cream.

 

Search Amazon for leather repair compound, or get the Saphir ones if you want to spend some extra $$.

post #16146 of 19072
Quote:
 
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Originally Posted by JezeC View Post
 

Hi guys, 

 

What's the best way to treat this? Can I put some brown polish on it to make it less visible? I was told by the shoemaker that the scar mark should not further deteriorate. These are seconds and are bought at a really good price, with the help of a generous member on SF. 

 

 

 

 

I would recommend returning them if you can. If the shoes fit you well, the topline will flex and there will be pressure when putting on and taking off the shoes,

post #16147 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by sleepyinsanfran View Post
  Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

I would recommend returning them if you can. If the shoes fit you well, the topline will flex and there will be pressure when putting on and taking off the shoes,

 

He bought this pair as 'seconds' so those defects are to be expected...

 

On the other hand its right above heel stiffeners, so it won't flex as much as expected.

post #16148 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

I have just bought a pair of Sander's, grain leather, Brogues and I am very pleased with them. When it comes to looking after them, do I treat them in the same way as smooth calf?

Yes, grained or pebble leather is calf that has had a pattern indented on it.

post #16149 of 19072

I have a brand new pair of rm williams. I have used them about three times. Should i apply Saphir renovateur, and then apply a layer or two of Saphir MDO wax? Is this the best way to get a nice shiny look and also make a protective layer?

post #16150 of 19072
The wax is all you need for shiny.
post #16151 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by ciny View Post
 

I have a brand new pair of rm williams. I have used them about three times. Should i apply Saphir renovateur, and then apply a layer or two of Saphir MDO wax? Is this the best way to get a nice shiny look and also make a protective layer?

 

Skip the reno.  Wax will make it shiny. I'd also recommend getting a cream polish in the appropriate color. Will cover scuffs better and keep the boots overall looking new.

 

Dylanh99

post #16152 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by dylanh99 View Post

Skip the reno.  Wax will make it shiny. I'd also recommend getting a cream polish in the appropriate color. Will cover scuffs better and keep the boots overall looking new.

Dylanh99

I got a box of dark brown Kiwi shoe cream. But i don't really know in what order i should use all the different products.

I'm also wondering how many layers of wax i recomended for the whole shoe. I know that if i'm trying to get the mirror shine i need many layers, but how many do i need to get a nice shine and finish for the whole shoe?

Thank you all for your response!
post #16153 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by ciny View Post


I got a box of dark brown Kiwi shoe cream. But i don't really know in what order i should use all the different products.

I'm also wondering how many layers of wax i recomended for the whole shoe. I know that if i'm trying to get the mirror shine i need many layers, but how many do i need to get a nice shine and finish for the whole shoe?

 

If you're using any creams then they go first, so it would be renovator/moisturiser, then wax based cream then wax polish.

 

The amount of layers you need varies, newer leather normally takes longer and more layers. There's no way of knowing how many you need just keep going until you achieve the finish you want.

post #16154 of 19072
Just wondering how was you guys' experience with Woly and Saphir wax polish? In my place, Saphir is almost double the price of Woly and after doing some researches, I've learned that Woly is a good brand as well so I am not sure if Saphir would worth the extra?

FYI, my shoes are mostly Allen Edmonds and I don't own any shell cordovan (hope to have one in the future tho)
post #16155 of 19072

If you already have Woly wax for some colors, there's not much reason to buy the same color wax made by Saphir.

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