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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1073

post #16081 of 19065
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post


No you don't need to strip your shoes for shoe care.

You could try leather deglazers or preparers for stripping wax and finishes off. But they are as toxic.

so if I use cream for the whole shoe about once a month or sometimes less, and i add one or two layers of wax to the toe box each time, i can keep doing that for years without removing anything at all?

post #16082 of 19065
Quote:
Originally Posted by mosy View Post

so if I use cream for the whole shoe about once a month or sometimes less, and i add one or two layers of wax to the toe box each time, i can keep doing that for years without removing anything at all?

Pretty much. But depends on how big your shoe wardrobe is and how heavy you are on the creams and polishes.

You will know when it's time to wax off.
post #16083 of 19065

Edit: Realised I've posted in the wrong thread. My sincere apologies


Edited by Meatyowllegs - 7/7/15 at 3:24am
post #16084 of 19065
Question for boot owners. If I wanted to stretch out the toe box in a few pairs of my boots anyone have any recommendations? Since its a few pairs I was considering buying a boot stretcher and do it at home. Just wondering before I buy it. Cheers
post #16085 of 19065
Quote:
Originally Posted by justinkapur View Post

Question for boot owners. If I wanted to stretch out the toe box in a few pairs of my boots anyone have any recommendations? Since its a few pairs I was considering buying a boot stretcher and do it at home. Just wondering before I buy it. Cheers

We call it a "toe box"...and the term does suggest the difficulty of stretching it--what would happen if you tried to stretch a cardboard box?...but more specifically it is a "toe stiffener." As such it is made of plastic (celastic) or leatherboard or even leather that is firmer and stiffer and less elastic than the rest of the shoe.

If it could be stretched, it couldn't serve its purpose as a stiffener.

And to force it is to distort it.
post #16086 of 19065
Toe box is tougher to stretch than vamp width, especially if it's cap toe......

And you cannot stretch any OSHA steel toe caps.
post #16087 of 19065

Does Meltonian or any other more affordable brand offer a comparable product to Saphir Renovateur?  If not, is there anything problematic about using Renovateur along with Meltonian cream, as opposed to Saphir's creams?  

post #16088 of 19065
Better options for conditioners are Lexol Conditioner, or Bick4. Both of which is cheaper than Saphir. Kiwi wax polish is fine as long as it isn't parade gloss.
post #16089 of 19065
Which shoe polish is the one to go for? I've only ever used Kiwi because its easy to get hold of but I'm sure there are better ones out there (I'm in the UK if it helps), should I use a cream or conditioner instead? I've been abusing my shoes for years and it is time to repent and give them a bit of care and attention.

And how hard would it be to get the scratch mark off the C&J I just bought on eBay?

post #16090 of 19065

This thread is obviously very long.  Does anyone know around which page or pages may have pictures of different shoes that have been polished using various shades of brown polishes from various polish brands?  I have some brown shoes and I have really neglected to polish them because I don't want to ruin the color.  However, it's getting to a point where they need some TLC, and I'd love to be able to see polishes on actual shoes (as opposed to the color palettes that are available) so I can choose the best matches.  Any guidance would be appreciated.  Thanks!

post #16091 of 19065
Quote:
Originally Posted by mosy View Post
 

This thread is obviously very long.  Does anyone know around which page or pages may have pictures of different shoes that have been polished using various shades of brown polishes from various polish brands?  I have some brown shoes and I have really neglected to polish them because I don't want to ruin the color.  However, it's getting to a point where they need some TLC, and I'd love to be able to see polishes on actual shoes (as opposed to the color palettes that are available) so I can choose the best matches.  Any guidance would be appreciated.  Thanks!


You can use the picture gallery on the right to narrow down your search to various iterations of brown footwear. Whether or not they are in relation to polishing brown shoes will require opening the post - I like to right click and open a new tab - then return to gallery view. 

 

The general consensus I've been able to glean from reading these pages over the last few months is, in the case of brown, use a polish slightly lighter in colour than the incumbent leather and then take your trial and error from there. Some people advocate using neutral polish to good effect.

post #16092 of 19065
Quote:
Originally Posted by mosy View Post

This thread is obviously very long.  Does anyone know around which page or pages may have pictures of different shoes that have been polished using various shades of brown polishes from various polish brands?  I have some brown shoes and I have really neglected to polish them because I don't want to ruin the color.  However, it's getting to a point where they need some TLC, and I'd love to be able to see polishes on actual shoes (as opposed to the color palettes that are available) so I can choose the best matches.  Any guidance would be appreciated.  Thanks!

In general it takes a long time to significantly change the color of shoes. Polishes have been "transparent" pigments and it takes a while for them to really be noticeable. A good rule of thumb is to polish brown shoes with a color slightly lighter. The waxes will naturally darken the leather over time, along with the sun and the lighter pigments help to counter this.

This is interesting that you might enjoy. Both of these shoes started the same color and using different methods of polishing after about two years here is the result.

http://leathersoul.com/2010/10/21/edward-green-aging-of-burgundy-antique/
post #16093 of 19065
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir Humphrey Appleby View Post

Which shoe polish is the one to go for? I've only ever used Kiwi because its easy to get hold of but I'm sure there are better ones out there (I'm in the UK if it helps), should I use a cream or conditioner instead? I've been abusing my shoes for years and it is time to repent and give them a bit of care and attention.

And how hard would it be to get the scratch mark off the C&J I just bought on eBay?


The first thing you need to start doing is use cedar shoe trees. Get some lexol, or back 4 as conditioner and pretty much any wax polish is fine, kiwi is fine, use Saphir if you want to spend the money.
post #16094 of 19065
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

The first thing you need to start doing is use cedar shoe trees. Get some lexol, or back 4 as conditioner and pretty much any wax polish is fine, kiwi is fine, use Saphir if you want to spend the money.
Thanks, I'm going to get shoe trees if they don't come with them anyway, how hard is it likely to be to get the right last?
post #16095 of 19065
They don't have to be lasted, just cedar shoe trees that are snug and pull out the creases.
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