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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1070

post #16036 of 19213
Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonHedonist View Post
 

@Berners15 - didn't know about omni'nettoyant. Think I'll pick up a bottle.

 

 

So, assuming Carmina is using halfway decent suede, is there really any need to fear little rain here and there if I left them unprotected?


Hangerproject do a great suede care section.

It would be dangerous for me to advise because it's a two way street. Yes suede protection works, and you may be overjoyed to have used it if the red wine goes flying.

I can only state that I do not use it and salt and water marks etc do not cause a problem for me. There again I rarely go splashing around in puddles on a suede day. You kind of have to weigh up the pros and cons. My father has a dark brown pair of Cape buck chukas and they must be a good 30-40 yrs old and they are unmarked. Lighter coloured suede is slightly more problematic.

Best of luck to you in your choices.

post #16037 of 19213

I suspect that more than half the fun of shoes is the buying of them. :embar:

post #16038 of 19213
Well, the initial wear of them. Buying them hurts my wallet.
post #16039 of 19213

I think I get the most pleasure from that golden period between breaking in a shoe, and needing to provide the first care session.

 

But then there's that feeling of taking a several-years-old pair and breathing new life into it and, looking upon your gleaming work, remembering why you loved that pair to begin with.

 

Perhaps that's the most satisfying.

 

On a side note, I brushed out the left suede boot for a while and the color lightened back up.

post #16040 of 19213
Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonHedonist View Post

@Berners15
- didn't know about omni'nettoyant. Think I'll pick up a bottle.


So, assuming Carmina is using halfway decent suede, is there really any need to fear little rain here and there if I left them unprotected?

I think—dark—suede is one of the easiest to clean after a patch of rough weather. They just need to be thoroughly dried and brushed after getting wet and shampooed if any stains appear. You can buy the Saphir shampoo or just use some of your own. I've found the results to be identical. More information about that here:http://oldleathershoe.com/wordpress/?p=1406
post #16041 of 19213
Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonHedonist View Post

I think I get the most pleasure from that golden period between breaking in a shoe, and needing to provide the first care session.

But then there's that feeling of taking a several-years-old pair and breathing new life into it and, looking upon your gleaming work, remembering why you loved that pair to begin with.

Perhaps that's the most satisfying.

On a side note, I brushed out the left suede boot for a while and the color lightened back up.

Very poetic.
post #16042 of 19213
Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonHedonist View Post
 

I think I get the most pleasure from that golden period between breaking in a shoe, and needing to provide the first care session.

 

But then there's that feeling of taking a several-years-old pair and breathing new life into it and, looking upon your gleaming work, remembering why you loved that pair to begin with.

 

Perhaps that's the most satisfying.

 

On a side note, I brushed out the left suede boot for a while and the color lightened back up.

Thats the best part !!!

 

Just to mention that now there is no barrier existing and  you need to reapply the protector! As i mentioned that it ll light up with brushing  now try to apply the protector from about 30cm away with light coats so not to darken again

post #16043 of 19213

I don't know @benhour. I might just risk leaving the suede exposed. What's the worst that could happen?

post #16044 of 19213

if the shoes were dark brown i would say leave them ! on the other hand even if you stain them with coffee (really difficult to take it off) you can always dye them and then have a ''new'' pair !! :satisfied: 

post #16045 of 19213
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodman View Post

So, I came across a pair of Di Bianco's (apparently they are owned by former Mantellassi people) made with Bologna construction and a full rubber sole and heel. I mentioned I had never seen a "better" shoe with a full rubber sole and heel as opposed to say a York or Danite sold and an English heel (rubber / leather combo) and I was told the shoes were constructed for comfort and it was not an attempt to cut corners. The comfort aspect makes sense but I have no idea as to the durability and longevity of a 100% rubber sole and heel. I'm curious if any one here has had any experience when the rubber literally hits the road. Are they comfortable? Will they remain comfortable? Are they durable? I occasionally have to spend all day on my feet so I'm intrigued but I don't want to waste my money on something that will quickly wear down and disappoint. Thanks.
in general why would you think that leather sole would outlast rubber? Or are you about resole?
post #16046 of 19213
Quote:
Originally Posted by Berners15 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonHedonist View Post

 
Found a nice pair of everyday walking boots in Barcelona: Carmina suede chukkas in a sandy brown.

Side note: I was very impressed at the price/quality ratio of Carmina footwear. However, shoes needed to be examined carefully, as their quality control for stitching seems a bit suspect.

So after three coats of suede protector, I could swear the upper on the left boot is just slightly darker than the other. Not really looking to spray a thicker coat on the right boot to try to even it out. Will this difference diminish soon? It's been a day with no change.


Welcome to the wonderful world of spray protectors, I never use them for just such reasons.
Good quality suede is easy to maintain, any spills tend to come out with an eraser and omni'nettoyant (Saphir) - you could try that and see if they return to original colour, might be worth a go.

I am in the nano camp, have not found it to discolor suede and being around red wine daily it has been a life saver.
post #16047 of 19213

Probably a silly question: If I have a pair of shoes with lasted shoe trees, and I rely on extra insoles to achieve a comfortable fit, do I remove the insoles before inserting the shoe trees? I'm wondering if *not* doing so might somehow damage or overstretch the shoes, if there is even such a thing. 

 

edit: for clarity

post #16048 of 19213
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meatyowllegs View Post

Probably a silly question: If I have a pair of shoes with lasted shoe trees, and I rely on extra insoles to achieve a comfortable fit, do I remove the insoles before inserting the shoe trees? I'm wondering if *not* doing so might somehow damage or overstretch the shoes, if there is even such a thing. 

It's only common sense. If the lasted shoe trees fit the shoe originally leaving third-party insoles in will cause the moist, warm leather to stretch to accommodate them. And then the leather will dry and set in that larger configuration.

That said, if you need insoles because the shoes are too big, the shoes don't fit you. But you know that. So, why do want to make the shoes bigger?
post #16049 of 19213
Yes, take the inserts out then insert the lasted shoe trees. In fact, doing so has the added benefit of airing the inserts.

I have had a pair of AEs fit very well with orthotic inserts and they were bought specifically bigger with that in mind at the store. I got generic shoe trees a size smaller and was able to fit them in with the inserts in.

I am in no position to criticise although I would think that most shoes that come with lasted shoe trees would have been priced in a manner (read: not cheap) that you'd want to make sure they actually fit before you bought them. Or perhaps you either got a smashing deal or a pair of Vass. No offence.
post #16050 of 19213
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


It's only common sense. If the lasted shoe trees fit the shoe originally leaving third-party insoles in will cause the moist, warm leather to stretch to accommodate them. And then the leather will dry and set in that larger configuration.

That said, if you need insoles because the shoes are too big, the shoes don't fit you. But you know that. So, why do want to make the shoes bigger?

 

Thank you for the explanation. How about the use of tongue pads? I've never tried tongue pads so please correct me if I'm wrong, but are they meant to be a permanent fixation, unlike third-party insoles? If so, would the use of tongue pads precipitate the same result as per the earlier mentioned scenario?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by striker View Post

Yes, take the inserts out then insert the lasted shoe trees. In fact, doing so has the added benefit of airing the inserts.

I have had a pair of AEs fit very well with orthotic inserts and they were bought specifically bigger with that in mind at the store. I got generic shoe trees a size smaller and was able to fit them in with the inserts in.

I am in no position to criticise although I would think that most shoes that come with lasted shoe trees would have been priced in a manner (read: not cheap) that you'd want to make sure they actually fit before you bought them. Or perhaps you either got a smashing deal or a pair of Vass. No offence.

 

Thank you for the feedback and no worries. Yes it's a pair of Vass - despite having done research over several months, it seems like I still got my sizing wrong *sigh*

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