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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1062

post #15916 of 19061
Can anyone direct me to the SF thread related to shoe care? I seem to have reached the wrong one.
post #15917 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

I think that it is very sad that Travers, seemingly, has been driven off this site. Sometimes his comments were slightly odd but - until recently - he was always cheerful and did know about shoe care. He obviously enjoyed contributing.  He was sometimes an easy target and I believe that some people took advantage of that. A sad day on SF.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

I hope that the moderator thinks twice and that Travers is still looking at this site. Travers made a considerable contribution to this thread and I would welcome him back. 

I did not personally appreciate his contributions and I know you (@Munky) wisely and repeatedly suggested that he spend more time listening/reading and less time commenting. (My paraphrasing.) To this point I believe he could have benefitted from that advice.

However, I did end up muting his comments or whatever it's called and that was acceptable for me.
post #15918 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stemo79 View Post

Dw you keep trying to justify travs outburst, prodding a cat? Are we cats? Animals, base creatures with no control? If you're that bloody pathetic that you lose your temper over flippant internet comments then I seriously fear for not only your well being but those around you.

Grow up, lighten up and get a life. Amen.

You're right, forget the cats...

You now, that's another story. It didn't take but a "moment in time" to provoke you into an argumentum ad hominem and loss of control. And I wasn't even trying-- I didn't call names or question your character or use coarse language.

edited for punctuation and clarity
Edited by DWFII - 6/25/15 at 8:22pm
post #15919 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


I suppose...on an individual basis...bespoke can be for the masses. But that's nearly an incomprehensible concept and hard to think about much less express. The masses are the masses because they more or less act as a group not as individuals.


You're getting in over your head here, if you will forgive me saying so. "Same construction specification" as what? Compared to what? You can look at handwelted work and see a significant difference in quality and reliability and strength in both techniques and materials versus GY. That's how you determine quality...be it lesser or greater--the nature and character of the materials and the techniques.

Simply not true. Pretty words but sophistry nonetheless. Just because you can string those words together in a sentence doesn't confer any validity at all. In fact, that's almost the original criteria for deception...even if it's only self-deception.

And even if it were true...what a treat!!--faking fakery. Posing as a poseur. Imitation faux leather.

I'm gonna get me some.

edited for punctuation and clarity

 

1. There are lower priced hand welted shoes out there.  Meermin being one of them.

 

2. There are retail companies doing last adjustments, Saint Crispins being one of them.  And their key ingredient isn't better-made lasts but physical trunk shows for fitting and/or measuring sessions.

 

If we marry 1 and 2, and replace the fitter (most probably not shoemakers for these retail operations) with 3D scanning machine+algorithm, viola, we get affordable and good fitting shoes.

 

Keep in mind that these are not going to be made better than top notch bespoke, nor they will fit better than top notch bespoke.  But most bespoke shoemakers aint top notch either.  And Saint Crispin's fit, while not great, is still better than RTW guesstimate.

post #15920 of 19061

Newby question here: 

 

Have recently embarked on higher quality shoe/boot expedition. All the shoes are fairly new, so haven't ventured into soap/conditioner territory yet. Don't have any coloured creams so am restricted to wax polish in flat tins. Always brush before polishing. 

 

At times, and depending on the part of the shoe, the polishing cloth, with the small amount of polish on it, darkens. Other parts of the shoe do not darken the cloth. 

 

My question is: is this dirt or am I removing the layer of pre-existing wax polish? 

 

Should I be focused on how the shoe ends up looking and/or what the cloth picks up in the polishing process?

post #15921 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by eljimberino View Post
 

Newby question here: 

 

Have recently embarked on higher quality shoe/boot expedition. All the shoes are fairly new, so haven't ventured into soap/conditioner territory yet. Don't have any coloured creams so am restricted to wax polish in flat tins. Always brush before polishing. 

 

At times, and depending on the part of the shoe, the polishing cloth, with the small amount of polish on it, darkens. Other parts of the shoe do not darken the cloth. 

 

My question is: is this dirt or am I removing the layer of pre-existing wax polish? 

 

Should I be focused on how the shoe ends up looking and/or what the cloth picks up in the polishing process?


I use a mildly damp cloth to wipe the shoe down after wearing. If only using a brush, I feel the shoe has not been cleaned enough depending on the condition. Once completely dry, applying a wax/polish/cream. Areas which have stitches or creases are definitely prone to hold some dirt/residue. Even when using a natural product to nourish/shine, I would find it a little surprising if the rag was completely clean after the application. 

post #15922 of 19061

Not sure if I'm posting in the correct thread, but since it is related to shoes I hope it is somewhat relevant.

 

I received a pair of new shoes and, upon some inspection, I noticed a cut into the sole on one of the shoes (forgive me if I'm using the wrong terminology as I'm particularly new to the shoe game). Should I be concerned about this? Specifically, is it considered a defect or simply part of the GYW process? Will this crack deepen with increased wear and reduce the durability of the shoe in the long run?

 

Thanks for reading!

 

 

 

post #15923 of 19061
That's totally normal.
post #15924 of 19061

Ah okay, so I presume cracks like these are the norm rather than the exception? Pardon my ignorance, but may I ask how and why do they arise?

post #15925 of 19061

Damp cloth as well, thank you @Organika

post #15926 of 19061

My routine is brushing, so my investments go for brushes.  But when they need some care (once every 6 month more or less), I use a midly damp cloth to wipe the shoe down (always after brushing), and work hard with it along the welt: it is always full of dirt and I do not want my brushes to get the nasty. Afterwards I brush again before applying a conditioner in the upper with a cloth and a neutral wax in the welt with a small brush (let it rest).  But If they need a very especial care (kind of discoloration) I apply a colored wax/cream once a year or more .  Do not abuse at all: 100 usd in cosmetics should last at least for 5 years?.:satisfied:

 

Hope this help.

post #15927 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meatyowllegs View Post
 

Ah okay, so I presume cracks like these are the norm rather than the exception? Pardon my ignorance, but may I ask how and why do they arise?

That is not a crack. It appears to be the area where the ends of the welt meet up with each other. In shoes with better finishing, this area is barely noticeable. 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goodyear_welt

post #15928 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by eljimberino View Post
 

Damp cloth as well, thank you @Organika


No problem. Unfortunately there are too many variable to decipher whether it would be dirt or finish. All depends on the leather, the shoes' original finish and application. It sounds like you are not having any issue with the final result and color transfer to the rag is common, shouldn't be harming the upper. 

post #15929 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapasman View Post
 

My routine is brushing, so my investments go for brushes.  

 

 

How many different brushes do you have? 

 

Do you wash them with water?

post #15930 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by benhour View Post

 First of all , welcome to the thread (if i am not mistaken this is your first post here) !

 Generally you can mirror shine even with the worst wax-polish , its just taking ages to perform! I have mirror shined a friends pair using a 1 euro wax! After the time required  there is the final result that is slightly different from brand to brand!! Some waxes give a long lasting and glassy finish ((really smooth and hard surface) Collonil 1909 wax, probably GKaren high shine but i have to mention that i havent used it and judging  only from the results i have seen, maybe Patrick help on that)) but it's harder to work with and need some experience . On the other hand there is waxes that produce a faster result but a little softer and duller finish(mirror but not as good as the previous results) (Saphir, standard kiwi) ! 

 Finally i cant be sure but Burgol's paste polish and daubers look like re-branded  Saphir (old Saphir jars its a common policy of saphir for re-branded products , old jars 100ml -new ones 75ml)

welcome again:happy:


Thank you for the welcome, bit I believe I might have made a few posts here before but I might be wrong. Burgol is made by a factory in Bern, Switzerland called Siegenthaler. Contrary to common belief it's not only Saphir that produces premium shoe care products in Europe.

The reason I commented was that someone said a mirror shine with Burgol can't be done and I felt a needed to dismiss this statement as I think it is incorrect and I also have a commercial interest in Burgol, we sell it in the store I own. We tried out and experimented with loads of shoe care products before we settled for Burgol as our preferred brand. It's better than most of the products we tried. I'm a long time user of Saphir myself but as we found that Burgol was level with Saphir is most regards, or better, we went with Burgol.

Burgol is more or less unknown outside the German speaking parts of the world but in Central Europe, and the premium shoe stores in this region, it has a very respected reputation. Plugging end.
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