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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1047

post #15691 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joshua Lee View Post
 

Thank you all (Patrick, Trav & DW) for the input on my situation. I understand there's a lot of options in leather repair/care and hearing all the different options possible is quite intriguing. 

 

To be more specific with my goal, the bag has to look uniform in color, as it's a handmade gift. Luckily I do have a lot of leather samples I can attempt these treatments on first before touching the bag. 

 

The options so far:

1. Gently rub with Reno'mat / apply similar color cream

2. Condition / burnish leather (would avoid using water in this case as the leather wasn't been conditioned for months)

3. Condition / spray dye leather

 

If it's interesting for thread, I can show my attempts using all the methods above on semi dyed pieces of leather. This whole bag situation has been an incredible learning experience in just how mind-numbingly difficult leather care/repair can be.

Don't dye the leather. Leave it as is, or else resort to coloring cream for better effect and ease of removal in the longer run.

post #15692 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joshua Lee View Post

Thank you all (Patrick, Trav & DW) for the input on my situation. I understand there's a lot of options in leather repair/care and hearing all the different options possible is quite intriguing. 

To be more specific with my goal, the bag has to look uniform in color, as it's a handmade gift. Luckily I do have a lot of leather samples I can attempt these treatments on first before touching the bag. 

The options so far:
1. Gently rub with Reno'mat / apply similar color cream
2. Condition / burnish leather (would avoid using water in this case as the leather wasn't been conditioned for months)
3. Condition / spray dye leather

If it's interesting for thread, I can show my attempts using all the methods above on semi dyed pieces of leather. This whole bag situation has been an incredible learning experience in just how mind-numbingly difficult leather care/repair can be.

Condition it, then slowly build up finish with cream polish and brushing.
post #15693 of 19072

I like the idea of dying and finishing using a shoe cream heavy in pigment. Romantic - yes, and also ease of removal.

post #15694 of 19072
I've read that a good stretching liquid recipe is half alcohol half water, should I add white vinegar to that to bring the ph up/down? Thanks in advance.
post #15695 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jorge View Post

I've read that a good stretching liquid recipe is half alcohol half water, should I add white vinegar to that to bring the ph up/down? Thanks in advance.

By the time you figure out such recipe, it's already better to get them stretch at a  good cobbler's place, or else return the shoes and buy the size that fits.

post #15696 of 19072
I don't really have any experience trying to stretch shoes and I don't know what kinds of effects vinegar and alcohol could potentially have together, so I am going to go with no.
post #15697 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jorge View Post

I've read that a good stretching liquid recipe is half alcohol half water, should I add white vinegar to that to bring the ph up/down? Thanks in advance.

Last time I used Bick 4/ (inside/out the shoe).  It performed very well.

post #15698 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

By the time you figure out such recipe, it's already better to get them stretch at a  good cobbler's place, or else return the shoes and buy the size that fits.
Yes always best to buy the shoe that fits. Thanks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I don't really have any experience trying to stretch shoes and I don't know what kinds of effects vinegar and alcohol could potentially have together, so I am going to go with no.
Not having first hand knowledge has never stopped anyone else from opining on SF biggrin.gif Thanks pB

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapasman View Post

Last time I used Bick 4/ (inside/out the shoe).  It performed very well.
Gracias Zapatosman lo probaré.
post #15699 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jorge View Post


Yes always best to buy the shoe that fits. Thanks.

Be aware though, certain shoe brands lack extra width choices, so, at many times, you may have to remedy to stretching. 

 

BTW, ethanol has got a pH of ~7.33, don't mix it with vinegar. Using emulsified oils are way more suitable for the process of molding and slow-stretching. 

post #15700 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Be aware though, certain shoe brands lack extra width choices, so, at many times, you may have to remedy to stretching. 

BTW, ethanol has got a pH of ~7.33, don't mix it with vinegar. Using emulsified oils are way more suitable for the process of molding and slow-stretching. 

Rubbing alcohol has a pH of 5.5.
post #15701 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Be aware though, certain shoe brands lack extra width choices, so, at many times, you may have to remedy to stretching. 

BTW, ethanol has got a pH of ~7.33, don't mix it with vinegar. Using emulsified oils are way more suitable for the process of molding and slow-stretching. 

You won't know if a pair of shoe fits or not after miles walked in them.
post #15702 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

Be aware though, certain shoe brands lack extra width choices, so, at many times, you may have to remedy to stretching. 

 

BTW, ethanol has got a pH of ~7.33, don't mix it with vinegar. Using emulsified oils are way more suitable for the process of molding and slow-stretching. 

pH's only refer to aqueous solutions by definition. Ethanol's pKa is 15.7 and in any practical sense does not dissociate nor affect pH. Mixing it with vinegar will do nothing, especially household vinegar which is mostly water. The only reaction you could possibly get is transesterification, but I doubt it. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


Rubbing alcohol has a pH of 5.5.

I would expect household alcohol to have a pH near 7 as well, since isopropyl has a pka of 16. I don't know why some websites are referencing it as having a pH of 5.5, unless there's other ingredients in household. Sigma-Aldrich's solutions have no data for pH, which is indicative that it's ph 7.

 

In fact, this MSDS shows it's neutral: http://www.sciencelab.com/msds.php?msdsId=9924413


Edited by jaywhyy - 6/19/15 at 2:07pm
post #15703 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaywhyy View Post
 

pH's only refer to aqueous solutions by definition. Ethanol's pKa is 15.7 and in any practical sense does not dissociate nor affect pH. Mixing it with vinegar will do nothing, especially household vinegar which is mostly water. The only reaction you could possibly get is transesterification, but I doubt it. 

I would expect household alcohol to have a pH near 7 as well, since isopropyl has a pka of 16. I don't know why some websites are referencing it as having a pH of 5.5, unless there's other ingredients in household. Sigma-Aldrich's solutions have no data for pH, which is indicative that it's ph 7.

 

In fact, this MSDS shows it's neutral: http://www.sciencelab.com/msds.php?msdsId=9924413

Most of the "alcohol" products out there nowadays are adulterated with probably scores of different stuffs in it. It's hard to tell, unless we can carry an experiment.

post #15704 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post


You won't know if a pair of shoe fits or not after miles walked in them.

In such sense, I take it that I can try and shove my 10.5D feet into a 6.5B pair of shoes, try walk them in a mile, and see which will bust first - the shoes, or my feet.

 

Seriously, the problem with RTW shoes is that you have to try find the size that resembles your foot dimension to the closest extent and minimize as much break in as possible. If bespoke shoes only need breaking in because of the material, then RTW shoes needs breaking in because of the whole last as well. 

post #15705 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

In such sense, I take it that I can try and shove my 10.5D feet into a 6.5B pair of shoes, try walk them in a mile, and see which will bust first - the shoes, or my feet.

 

Seriously, the problem with RTW shoes is that you have to try find the size that resembles your foot dimension to the closest extent and minimize as much break in as possible. If bespoke shoes only need breaking in because of the material, then RTW shoes needs breaking in because of the whole last as well. 

 

If your 10.5D feet can be shoved into a 6.5B pair of shoes, then your feet size is not 10.5D.

 

Also, stop fantasizing bespoke shoes.  Whatever you wrote just now about bespoke is so far off from the truth.

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