or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1045

post #15661 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapasman View Post

This,

What happened here?

Optimized by JPEGmini 3.12.0.2 0x408848a4

I am near-as-nevermind certain the problem is simply that the counter was cut from the margins of the hide--belly, shoulder, shank, or what I call "flank." Prime leather would not do that.
post #15662 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


I am near-as-nevermind certain the problem is simply that the counter was cut from the margins of the hide--belly, shoulder, shank, or what I call "flank." Prime leather would not do that.

I thought that was part of poor lasting. So, it wasn't?

post #15663 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joshua Lee View Post

They are indeed vegetable tanned leathers. Can you go further in detail about the burnishing? As far as I'm aware, burnishing usually involves wax, leather dye and a piece of canvas to generate a heat source. 

In this case, would I be adding a shoe cream to the leather, then wax and finishing with some heavy brushing with a piece of canvas?

The other option I have is using a spray to dye/treat the leather sections. If burnishing or renomat doesn't work, I'll document my dye job for you guys. So far testing the dye on sample leather gave really promising results.

No NO NONONNONONO. Just using cream polish a little at a time with brushing in between applications. That's all you have to do. Don't go burnishing your shoes with dye and such, let burnishing happen naturally with wear.
post #15664 of 19067
Wetting leather and rubbing it isn't good advice. Wetting leather raises the pH, which will make it darker yes, but it also starts to break the ionic attraction of all of the leather constitutes and and lead to a not great turn out down the road. Just condition, and then build the finish using cream polish, like I said, a little at a time.
post #15665 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


No NO NONONNONONO. Just using cream polish a little at a time with brushing in between applications. That's all you have to do. Don't go burnishing your shoes with dye and such, let burnishing happen naturally with wear.

Was his piece not a handbag of sort and a watch strap? Creams are gonna be cool, but doesn't bring out sufficient potential of the leather, I think.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Wetting leather and rubbing it isn't good advice. Wetting leather raises the pH, which will make it darker yes, but it also starts to break the ionic attraction of all of the leather constitutes and and lead to a not great turn out down the road. Just condition, and then build the finish using cream polish, like I said, a little at a time.

I'd like the idea of burnishing with distilled water, though.

post #15666 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

Was his piece not a handbag of sort and a watch strap? Creams are gonna be cool, but doesn't bring out sufficient potential of the leather, I think.

 

I'd like the idea of burnishing with distilled water, though.

Getting leather wet and then rubbing it is not a good idea. I dont know what " bring out sufficient potential of the leather" means, but water plus friction on leather means wear and degradation. Creams, conditioner and brushing is all most finishes need.

post #15667 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdavro23 View Post
 

Getting leather wet and then rubbing it is not a good idea. I dont know what " bring out sufficient potential of the leather" means, but water plus friction on leather means wear and degradation. Creams, conditioner and brushing is all most finishes need.

I was thinking that applying traditional burnishing technique on that small piece would have been a fun thing to do. Traditional burnishing require just that - dampened surface and slicking with a smooth tool. 

 

But, oh well, cream will do fine, along with brushing.

post #15668 of 19067

Besides, it's veg tanned leather. Getting the surface burnished is just the right thing. Only pure veg tanned leather are burnishable. 

post #15669 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdavro23 View Post

Getting leather wet and then rubbing it is not a good idea. I dont know what " bring out sufficient potential of the leather" means, but water plus friction on leather means wear and degradation. Creams, conditioner and brushing is all most finishes need.

Burnishing / rubbing leather ...esp. veg tanned leather...with water is not usually detrimental to the leather. It's a technique that is as old as shoemaking and most makers do it in one form or another at some point in the process.
post #15670 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Burnishing / rubbing leather ...esp. veg tanned leather...with water is not usually detrimental to the leather. It's a technique that is as old as shoemaking and most makers do it in one form or another at some point in the process.

I stand corrected.

post #15671 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Burnishing / rubbing leather ...esp. veg tanned leather...with water is not usually detrimental to the leather. It's a technique that is as old as shoemaking and most makers do it in one form or another at some point in the process.

It is noteworthy, though, that the water source nowadays are rather "poisonous" in many ways, and the technique is perhaps best employed with distilled water.

post #15672 of 19067
I think this is one area I will disagree with you on DW. Water isn't good for leather, it may not be immediately detrimental, but it definitely sets up the leather protein to slowly start breaking bonds with everything that makes it leather. I think, if you want to burnish leather you should do so with waxes and creams that don't have influence on the leather constituent pH. It maybe be a traditional way of doing things, but modern leather science says otherwise.
post #15673 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


I am near-as-nevermind certain the problem is simply that the counter was cut from the margins of the hide--belly, shoulder, shank, or what I call "flank." Prime leather would not do that.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

I thought that was part of poor lasting. So, it wasn't?

The unswer from the maker in this low end quality shoe is (I would avoid literally translation) that there is an internal seam at the heel that produces always some bulge (do not know how to translate the type of seam).  You must be really carefull at this side of the shoe while applying heat from the iron cause the surface is not plain (see video), has volumen and there is a seam.  If the bulge is due to an excess of material and/or poorly stiched, the heat will produce the results showed.

 

I thought it was a poor lasting too, and I will agree with DW that the leather must be thin and low quality.

 

What was really interesting and weird to me was the heat application with an iron machine.

post #15674 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapasman View Post
 

 

The unswer from the maker in this low end quality shoe is (I would avoid literally translation) that there is an internal seam at the heel that produces always some bulge (do not know how to translate the type of seam).  You must be really carefull at this side of the shoe while applying heat from the iron cause the surface is not plain (see video), has volumen and there is a seam.  If the bulge is due to an excess of material and/or poorly stiched, the heat will produce the results showed.

 

I thought it was a poor lasting too, and I will agree with DW that the leather must be thin and low quality.

 

What was really interesting and weird to me was the heat application with an iron machine.

The heat is some sort of "ironing" that works with the creamy compound.

 

The seam is literally called "heel seams". I've seen this a lot, from bespoke shoes to even combat boots in the 60s - 70s.

post #15675 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I think this is one area I will disagree with you on DW. Water isn't good for leather, it may not be immediately detrimental, but it definitely sets up the leather protein to slowly start breaking bonds with everything that makes it leather. I think, if you want to burnish leather you should do so with waxes and creams that don't have influence on the leather constituent pH. It maybe be a traditional way of doing things, but modern leather science says otherwise.

Burnishing with waxes can risk unwanted buildups. However, I think I like the idea of using cream, because it is more fluid and will provide excellent saturation of the grain.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**