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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1044

post #15646 of 19272

Forgot to say they are new.

post #15647 of 19272

Faulty lasting. Wouldn't be a bother, really.

post #15648 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

What exactly is the argument? confused.gif

All leather talk is good with me smile.gif
post #15649 of 19272

I should forewarn you that it depends, because certain people get a step above the normal arousal when they are around with leather items :smarmy:

post #15650 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by smoothie1 View Post

These ridiculous pissing contests are the worst. Can we get back to discussing shoes?

 

Physical shoes or something someone never seen or touch in real life?

post #15651 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post
 

 

Physical shoes or something someone never seen or touch in real life?

 

oh snap.

post #15652 of 19272
How overdue am I for a resole?

Appreciate if anyone can explain whether the re-sole will address only the heel, or the forefoot as well. Seems like the forefoot is in fine shape but I'm not sure what to think about that heel.

Shoes are shell cordovan loafers by Carmina, by the way, if anyone was wondering.





post #15653 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by xizenta View Post

How overdue am I for a resole?

Appreciate if anyone can explain whether the re-sole will address only the heel, or the forefoot as well. Seems like the forefoot is in fine shape but I'm not sure what to think about that heel.

Shoes are shell cordovan loafers by Carmina, by the way, if anyone was wondering.


  Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)   Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
  Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

You should be able to have just the heels done. You'll definitely need a new heel stack as you've worn well into the leather. When you press on the forefoot of the sole, does it feel pretty spongy? If you're able to depress it rather easily you may want to consider just having the entire sole replaced. I doubt you'll get enough wear out of the sole to warrant doing just heels right now.

post #15654 of 19272

Definitely need a new top lift (the outermost layer of rubber/leather of the heel).  Heel stack can be amended and then leveled.

 

Try get a new heel top lift earlier next time, before it wears into the heel stack.

 

My personal criterion for resole are either a hole in one of the soles or the toe tips are about to wear to the welts. 

 

Spongy outsoles is too subjective of a test; some of my shoes stay spongy for many many wears before a hole shows up at the outsole.

post #15655 of 19272

they need a new heel  for sure and 90% a resoling too

post #15656 of 19272

It is impossible to tell from those pics if you need a resole, but...you arrive a bit late for a new heel top lift/heel stack!!.  If it is a single outsole I would replace it too.

post #15657 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapasman View Post
 

This,

 

What happened here?

 

Optimized by JPEGmini 3.12.0.2 0x408848a4

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

Faulty lasting. Wouldn't be a bother, really.

Wrong unswer, nothing to do with the lasting.  Check this video:

 

 http://www.iniziativeconciarieassociate.it/sito/pagina.php?IDmenu=37&IDarticolo=32

 

Any other guess?

post #15658 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joshua Lee View Post
 

Hi Guys,

 

I'm in need of some advice on fixing a dye job I did on a suede/leather bag. Recently, I used Tarrago Suede / Nubuck dye (Alcohol based, penetrating dye) to change the color from Green to a darker navy. The results were pretty successful overall, however there were some incidents where the suede dye landed on the vegetable tanned (no glazing/ailine finish) sections of the bag. 

 

Any ideas how to remove the dye or slightly blend it out of the leather sections? Considering the leather doesn't have a protective layer / finishing and is only vegetable tanned, I'm assuming the dye penetrated some layers of the leather but not fully as it's not incredibly dark. Hopefully there's a solution where I can lift some of the dye out and then use a highly pigmented cream to even out the color, or worst case scenario, use a leather dye to completely mask the original color. 

 

Much appreciated for your time gents!

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

If rubbing with renomat or some sort of deglazer doesn't work leather doctor has a product called "Prep-4.4" that will remove it. The downside to any removal methods is it will most likely take off some or all of that red dye that is there so you will have to work on redying and blending the color. Might be better off just leaving the dye-over-color parts alone if you don't want a more serious project.

That russet-esque surface is easily restored through burnishing, if those are veg tanned leathers, or else care products will most likely bring some color saturation, which will uniform the colors better.

 

They are indeed vegetable tanned leathers. Can you go further in detail about the burnishing? As far as I'm aware, burnishing usually involves wax, leather dye and a piece of canvas to generate a heat source. 

 

In this case, would I be adding a shoe cream to the leather, then wax and finishing with some heavy brushing with a piece of canvas?

 

The other option I have is using a spray to dye/treat the leather sections. If burnishing or renomat doesn't work, I'll document my dye job for you guys. So far testing the dye on sample leather gave really promising results.

post #15659 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapasman View Post
 

 

 

Wrong unswer, nothing to do with the lasting.  Check this video:

 

 http://www.iniziativeconciarieassociate.it/sito/pagina.php?IDmenu=37&IDarticolo=32

 

Any other guess?

It's funny that you don't take it as something was wrong when pulling the upper over the last. That's the perfect classic case of when it's pulled over clumsily, wrinkling the heel seat area.

 

That in the video is antiquing cream. Usual stuff. 

post #15660 of 19272
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joshua Lee View Post
 

 

They are indeed vegetable tanned leathers. Can you go further in detail about the burnishing? As far as I'm aware, burnishing usually involves wax, leather dye and a piece of canvas to generate a heat source. 

 

In this case, would I be adding a shoe cream to the leather, then wax and finishing with some heavy brushing with a piece of canvas?

 

The other option I have is using a spray to dye/treat the leather sections. If burnishing or renomat doesn't work, I'll document my dye job for you guys. So far testing the dye on sample leather gave really promising results.

To burnish leather, dampened the grain heavily, then use canvas piece, or a bone, a slicker, and rub over the dampen surface. It will darken the area. 

 

You don't have to add shoe cream for no reason. True burnishing should be done on naked, unsealed leather.

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