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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1036

post #15526 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapasman View Post
 

I have to say that I am very happy with my shitty acrylic coat of Alden Shell #8.  

 

Seriously Travers, we all love different shoes, leathers, colours, polishing products...I even love my CG Grafton Churchs for winter time. We do not need to be so radical with those issues and the best thing is to experiment and try to enjoy with all of them.

If you love 'em, go ahead, just as how I hate them. Remember what I said several times ago - my influence remains my influence, as your shoes are up to your hands to do whatever you want on them.

 

If they ain't corrected grain, it's unreasonable, and to a point, deceptive, to cover them up with such chemicals. If it ain't broken, don't fix it. I have to take these coatings off because they prevent the leather from being at its best. And look at the dye job. They did it like how Bush was trying to cover his wrong doings up (LOL political reference).

 

As of radical, I'm not one of those uber liberals. I've been advocating experiments with shoe leathers and shoe care products ever since I officially voice and enter myself on this thread. 

 

Your advice on "try to enjoy" does not work with someone like me. If I don't like it, then, I don't like it. If I have a chance to remove it, then hell freaking yeah is the answer.

post #15527 of 19050

Much respect, @DWFII. Your words have an air of Zen philosophy to them.

 

As one often obsessed with the intentional quality of man-made objects, I feel I share some of that sentiment - though not to the level of a craftsman.

 

Even still, I don't see the picture as one of extremes (the exacto-knife vs the fussy traditional tool), but rather one of shades of gray. I've never owned a pair of Nikes and for me, a pair of bespoke John Lobb shoes would be financially foolish (perhaps a bit further down the road).

 

Thus I must, quite literally, walk the middle ground. However, it is quite frustrating because this middle ground is inhabited by as much good value as it is utter rubbish and it can be quite tedious to ferret out the correct choice.

post #15528 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

If you love 'em, go ahead, just as how I hate them. Remember what I said several times ago - my influence remains my influence, as your shoes are up to your hands to do whatever you want on them.

 

If they ain't corrected grain, it's unreasonable, and to a point, deceptive, to cover them up with such chemicals. If it ain't broken, don't fix it. I have to take these coatings off because they prevent the leather from being at its best. And look at the dye job. They did it like how Bush was trying to cover his wrong doings up (LOL political reference).

 

As of radical, I'm not one of those uber liberals. I've been advocating experiments with shoe leathers and shoe care products ever since I officially voice and enter myself on this thread. 

 

Your advice on "try to enjoy" does not work with someone like me. If I don't like it, then, I don't like it. If I have a chance to remove it, then hell freaking yeah is the answer.

Well,  I do not reach your level of "obssesion" about shoe leather but I must say that your shells shoes are in perfect condition.  :)

post #15529 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbhan12 View Post

PatrickBooth, are you a chemist or knowledgable in chemistry? I'm curious how you've come to learn to keep the pH of leather "in check", and why to use vinegar and water to bring the pH "back down" after walking on a salted sidewalk or road.

Perhaps you can explain to another chemist with a degree from a top 10 American university in greater detail.

I'm not a chemist, but have done a fair amount of reading on leather. Leather protein fibers are amphoteric with an isoelectric point around a pH of 6. Leather wants to be acidic in the range of 3-5, which makes the protein fiber ionic positive, which attracts the ionic negative agents added at the tannery such as tanning agents, dye, fatliquor and so on. When leather is exposed to a very alkaline substance such as salt water the protein fibers shift above the isoelectric point and reject the ionic negative stuff, which is what makes leather leather. It essentially reverts to rawhide and becomes brittle because of the breaking of hydrogen bonds.
Quote:
Originally Posted by manasdirge View Post


Hi patrickBOOTH, do you have any suggestions on leather sole protection products? like http://www.collonil.co.uk/collonil/bottles/collonil-sole-guard ? I recently got a pair of santoni loafers which soles are wearing a bit fast, will sole protection products help?

thanks in advance!

I just walk on leather soles.
post #15530 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapasman View Post
 

Well,  I do not reach your level of "obsession" about shoe leather but I must say that your shells shoes are in perfect condition.  :)

My stupid AE special makeup bal ankle boots (which cost me the kind of money that I should have invested in St. C's RTW or Carmina Shell Cordovan line) looked like hell from the sun and heat yesterday. Really gives me a depressing day because I've been keeping the natural finish looking pristine. 

post #15531 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonHedonist View Post

Much respect, @DWFII
. Your words have an air of Zen philosophy to them.

As one often obsessed with the intentional quality of man-made objects, I feel I share some of that sentiment - though not to the level of a craftsman.

Even still, I don't see the picture as one of extremes (the exacto-knife vs the fussy traditional tool), but rather one of shades of gray. I've never owned a pair of Nikes and for me, a pair of bespoke John Lobb shoes would be financially foolish (perhaps a bit further down the road).

Thus I must, quite literally, walk the middle ground. However, it is quite frustrating because this middle ground is inhabited by as much good value as it is utter rubbish and it can be quite tedious to ferret out the correct choice.

No worries...But that said, I feel I must remark that the advice to buy John Lobb was mostly tongue-in-cheek.

As far as the exacto-knife example is concerned...well, in this life everything is like that, IMO. It just depends on how much skill and excellence you want to bring to living, nevermind shoemaking.

Maybe it's just my age or the time in harness...and who knows which comes first--the hat or the cattle...but there is a certain philosophical perspective that seems to go hand-in-hand with being a Maker (of anything). I suspect it's another one of those skills or insights that is informed or arises somewhat spontaneously when one consistently chooses to do things the fussy way over a lifetime.

edited for punctuation and clarity
Edited by DWFII - 6/11/15 at 11:21am
post #15532 of 19050
Hi wondering if anybody can help me identify the below stain. At first I thought it was oil, then thought it was a water / salt stain:



I've tried vinegar and water but with no avail. When I do wet it the stain gets darker:



Thanks
post #15533 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by irbe View Post

Hi wondering if anybody can help me identify the below stain. At first I thought it was oil, then thought it was a water / salt stain:



I've tried vinegar and water but with no avail. When I do wet it the stain gets darker:



Thanks

What you caught was not even a stain, just a slight discoloration that should have been able to get fixed by dampened cloth, brushing, and possibly some shoe creams. You went a little far with the vinegar solution on such deal. I'd say let it dry, don't even touch it, and once it is completely dry, that is when you can brush and/or cream it.

post #15534 of 19050
hrmm i tried a damp cloth first and it was still there. Sorry when u say putting cream on it, I'm guessing you are referring to polish that matches the shoe color? I always just us neatral sapphir on my shoes.

Thanks.
post #15535 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by irbe View Post

hrmm i tried a damp cloth first and it was still there. Sorry when u say putting cream on it, I'm guessing you are referring to polish that matches the shoe color? I always just us neatral sapphir on my shoes.

Thanks.

If you use neutral, be aware of surface saturation, which would lead to an interestingly darkened surface.

 

Before you take the next step, let the shoes dry thoroughly.

post #15536 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

If you strip that shitty acrylic down and apply a natural wax finish on top instead, it will give you a deep, reflective glow that looks true to the hides' nature. 

 

A conditioner will certainly make the acrylic a little foggy, but you have to know, it's the solvents that actually removes them. This is part of the reason why Alden of Carmel would tell you NOT to use a solvent to clean under any circumstances. They were afraid it would spoil their little lie. 


To me, learning of the Alden acrylic application is a bit of a revelation and explains why a simple wiping with a damp cloth and buffing with a dry soft cloth makes Alden shell shine more than actually adding polish or conditioner. You are actually wiping off/buffing off some of the polish to reveal the acrylic. 

post #15537 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by mediahound View Post
 


To me, learning of the Alden acrylic application is a bit of a revelation and explains why a simple wiping with a damp cloth and buffing with a dry soft cloth makes Alden shell shine more than actually adding polish or conditioner. You are actually wiping off/buffing off some of the polish to reveal the acrylic. 

But you have to look again and see for yourself, the coating makes the leather looking fake. 

 

Check out @patrickBOOTH 's shell dress shoes being spitshined and all. The natural finish really shines brighter and are more true to the leather. 

post #15538 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

But you have to look again and see for yourself, the coating makes the leather looking fake. 

 

Check out @patrickBOOTH 's shell dress shoes being spitshined and all. The natural finish really shines brighter and are more true to the leather. 

 

I'm sure Aldens will get that way too, over the years after the acrylic wears off but I really like the shine myself like:

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Burzan View Post
 

 
post #15539 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by mediahound View Post
 

 

I'm sure Aldens will get that way too, over the years after the acrylic wears off but I really like the shine myself like:

 

Check out my Dundees above. If I was to bring them outside, today, with Washington's sunlight, they'll shine just as bright, if not better than that.

post #15540 of 19050


 

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