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post #15466 of 19839
Quote:
Originally Posted by mediahound View Post

For shell Cordovan what's better Saphir Renovateur or Saphir neutral Cordovan cream? I'm asking because I heard that the Cordovan cream is specifically formulated for shell Cordovan without turpentine, whereas Renovateur is sort of an all-purpose leather conditioner and not specifcally formulated for shell cordovan.

Cordovan cream is only so fun to use. Other than that, it doesn't make a difference. 

post #15467 of 19839
Quote:
Originally Posted by mediahound View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Leather products companies assert a lot of things, however logic prevails; anything that makes leather soles softer will also make it wear faster.

I don't know, the soft and nicely conditioned baseball glove will last longer than the one that's hard and crumbling.

 

I use leather honey on my leather soles once a year....I have no claim to dispute patrickBOOTH as my rotation is large enough that none get worn too much and his logic is sound to me. Reason I use leather honey is that I will often wear my leather soled boots/shoes in the rain/drizzle (not downpour) and I feel it helps keep the sole from getting saturated.

post #15468 of 19839
Quote:
Originally Posted by mediahound View Post

I don't know, the soft and nicely conditioned baseball glove will last longer than the one that's hard and crumbling.

Sole leathers are quite stiff.

Also, you don't grind your baseball gloves against paved roads on a daily basis, do you?
post #15469 of 19839
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post


Sole leathers are quite stiff.

Also, you don't grind your baseball gloves against paved roads on a daily basis, do you?

Some baseballs can be really hard on the gloves, especially if the pitcher has got a monster's arm. 

post #15470 of 19839
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

Cordovan cream is only so fun to use. Other than that, it doesn't make a difference. 


What do you mean by "Cordovan cream is only so fun to use." ?

post #15471 of 19839
Quote:
Originally Posted by mediahound View Post
 


What do you mean by "Cordovan cream is only so fun to use." ?

It's there with a name only for the purpose of extra revenue for Saphir and others. It's fun to use, because the thought of applying proper product to specific material as a treatment is a pleasant thought, and because so many people suffer Barnum's effect, uncritical acceptance, and confirmation bias. Other than that, let's be real, it's just another jar of cream with only one ingredient different to the regular cream. 

post #15472 of 19839
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

It's there with a name only for the purpose of extra revenue for Saphir and others. It's fun to use, because the thought of applying proper product to specific material as a treatment is a pleasant thought, and because so many people suffer Barnum's effect, uncritical acceptance, and confirmation bias. Other than that, let's be real, it's just another jar of cream with only one ingredient different to the regular cream. 

 

Thanks. 

post #15473 of 19839

I was hoping that those terms did not turn me into a jerk :fonz:

post #15474 of 19839

I've seen a few posts from folks who bought them saying the cordovan specific Saphir creams perform really well. Do you think it's just hype?

post #15475 of 19839

Such as:

 

http://www.reddit.com/r/goodyearwelt/comments/26yi2o/has_anyone_ever_tried_saphir_shell_cordovan_cream/chvyixu

 

http://www.reddit.com/r/goodyearwelt/comments/26yi2o/has_anyone_ever_tried_saphir_shell_cordovan_cream/ci56d8d

 

 

and,

Quote:
Originally Posted by kirbya View Post


I was able to speak to Saphir about this question. The Creme Cordovan has a lower amount of turpentine than the Pommadier Cream and the addition of Neats Foot Oil to help the nutrients penetrate the closed pours of cordovan leather. They said that you could use a wax on top of the Creme Cordovan to bring up the shine. However, given that Saphir makes a polish specifically for cordovan, I'd stick to it primarily.

Another note on the Creme Cordovan -- because of the wide variety of cordovan finishes, don't hesitate using just the Creme Cordovan neutral or combining one or more colors of Creme Cordovan to match the finish of your shoes. The benefits of using this cordovan-specific polish far outweigh not using it at all or using something that is not designed specifically for this unique leather.
 
 
 
post #15476 of 19839
Quote:
Originally Posted by mediahound View Post
 

I've seen a few posts from folks who bought them saying the cordovan specific Saphir creams perform really well. Do you think it's just hype?

Yes. Mostly hype. They get caught into classical conditioning without even knowing it. 

 

Personally, I'd been using grease, Otterwax Leather Salve, and Montana Pitch Blend dressing on my shell cordovan footwear without any ill effect. patrickBOOTH used Glen Karen cream and spitshine wax on his St. Crispin shell cordovan to excellent effects. Namor used Saphir Creme Surfine navy blue on his shell bal boots and it does not prompt any problems. People used to say anything with turpentine in it cannot be used on shell cordovan. It turns out, dearly beloved Venetian cream is full of turps. 

 

All in all, it's just a matter of whether if one is willing to go far and experience for one's self in regards to develop a maintenance regimen for one's own shoes. Roughly five years ago, shell cordovan was still a relatively new material, and expensive, too, in that regards. Anything so new and so expensive would prompt people their curiosity. It is indeed very intelligent of those companies to exploit those curiosity, and get the best out of it. 

 

Two cents that hopefully sounds.

post #15477 of 19839
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

Yes. Mostly hype. They get caught into classical conditioning without even knowing it. 

 

Personally, I'd been using grease, Otterwax Leather Salve, and Montana Pitch Blend dressing on my shell cordovan footwear without any ill effect. patrickBOOTH used Glen Karen cream and spitshine wax on his St. Crispin shell cordovan to excellent effects. Namor used Saphir Creme Surfine navy blue on his shell bal boots and it does not prompt any problems. People used to say anything with turpentine in it cannot be used on shell cordovan. It turns out, dearly beloved Venetian cream is full of turps. 

 

All in all, it's just a matter of whether if one is willing to go far and experience for one's self in regards to develop a maintenance regimen for one's own shoes. Roughly five years ago, shell cordovan was still a relatively new material, and expensive, too, in that regards. Anything so new and so expensive would prompt people their curiosity. It is indeed very intelligent of those companies to exploit those curiosity, and get the best out of it. 

 

Two cents that hopefully sounds.


Just one sticking point above. Shell Cordovan has been around hundreds of years, not just 5 years. 

 

Alden has even been making the 975 since the 1950s. 

post #15478 of 19839
Quote:
Originally Posted by mediahound View Post
 


Just one sticking point above. Shell Cordovan has been around hundreds of years, not just 5 years. 

 

Alden has even been making the 975 since the 1950s. 

They emerge into popularity only so recently in a very bizarre way. Try and recall the shell hype, when everybody must have a pair of shell to promote self-image and coolness or sort. 

post #15479 of 19839
Quote:
Originally Posted by mediahound View Post


Just one sticking point above. Shell Cordovan has been around hundreds of years, not just 5 years. 

Alden has even been making the 975 since the 1950s. 

Probably not hundreds of years. Mid 20th century or there-abouts. No readily available advertisements for shell cordovan, prior to WWII.

It might have been there...for a select few...but production of shell required a technology for splitting horse butts that doesn't come along until mid 19th century.
post #15480 of 19839
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Probably not hundreds of years. Mid 20th century or there-abouts. No readily available advertisements for shell cordovan, prior to WWII.

It might have been there...for a select few...but production of shell required a technology for splitting horse butts that doesn't come along until mid 19th century.

Prior the existence of "shell cordovan", the guys at Wolverine created a product they called "shell horsehide" in the 1950s. Probably not as finicky as the shell itself, and not as weird when it comes to anatomical concepts. 

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