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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1030

post #15436 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

This is why the use of water during oiling or conditioning is necessary. We want a water content, but we don't want downpour, showers, or puddles to wash our shoes. I still run my shoes down the running water everyday, using a dauber to get the dirt out. It certainly works better when there is a waterproofing cream.
Don't really get the disbelief and what you mean here. 

I don't know that running your shoes under the water is great for cleaning them. I would think a good brushing is enough. Also, water has too high of a pH to be optimal for leather.

I just don't believe that oxidation and an oil turning rancid is necessarily different. I think it is semantics, rancid is something lay people use to describe an unfavorable condition of something whether that is a smell, or appearance or something, but the fact is an oil going "rancid" is due to oxidation. I've never read aromatic oils inhibiting oxidation. If you have some literature on that, I'd love to take a gander.
post #15437 of 19259
Light and heat will also cause oils to oxidize/rancid so no aromatic oil aid is going to help that
post #15438 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

His shoes are "thoroughly worn" before being conditioned. And oil penetrating and lubricating leathers in the "long term". Pseudo science.

Gotta admire him for fancying history, from wanting to recreate reverse waxed calf to using grease made from old fashioned recipe.

What is the exact nature of your hostile attitude towards my comments? Why the hell, but I never recalled if anything I did was exactly 100 % "scientific". 

No thanks to that admiration. If you would so kindly to look at how people are running back to history, why people desire such thing as hand welting or instead of cementing, I would much doubt if you would retain your arrogant attitude.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post


Why would you subject your brushes to all those extra chemicals in shampoo?

Extra chemicals? Like what? Petroleum distillates? Glycerine? Have you even care to look up the ingredients of the shampoo I used? Did you not read that I wash the brushes after shampooing them? 

post #15439 of 19259

I saw a Japanese shoe shine video where the guy painted on a dye / sole treatment. Anyone have recommendations for what product and brush will do this well?

 

Screenshot:

 

 

post #15440 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


I don't know that running your shoes under the water is great for cleaning them. I would think a good brushing is enough. Also, water has too high of a pH to be optimal for leather.

I just don't believe that oxidation and an oil turning rancid is necessarily different. I think it is semantics, rancid is something lay people use to describe an unfavorable condition of something whether that is a smell, or appearance or something, but the fact is an oil going "rancid" is due to oxidation. I've never read aromatic oils inhibiting oxidation. If you have some literature on that, I'd love to take a gander.

Water's pH is basically neutral. Not much of a harm, though, to be real. Unless the leather was not treated, I'd be worry of hardening afterwards.

 

Rancidity needs a whole lot to occur, Pat. It's a whole clusterfuck of moisture, storage/wear condition, how the ingredient was extracted, how was it used, and many more. Cod oil turns rancid in order for reversed waxed calf to be completed, and that cannot be labeled as rancid, because without the oxidized oil, waxed calf will sure be a grease ball. Linseed oil goes oxidized leaving a glossy surface. It doesn't necessarily stick to the principle that all oils that oxidize will go rancid, Pat. 

 

As of aromatic oils, read Russian Empire Leather (not the communist kersey stuff that was basically pleather). They used birch tar oil (I have a bottle). The stuff from sunken ship in England will speak for me, Pat.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kahuna75 View Post

Light and heat will also cause oils to oxidize/rancid so no aromatic oil aid is going to help that

Aromatic oils aid in preventing bacteria growth and infection, which is the prime factor of mold and rancid to set on. Other than that, oxidized oils doesn't really make a high school drama, in addition to a proper wax sealant, can prevent premature oxidation at its best.

post #15441 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by mediahound View Post
 

I saw a Japanese shoe shine video where the guy painted on a dye / sole treatment. Anyone have recommendations for what product and brush will do this well?

 

Screenshot:

 

 

It's a sole oil recipe. 

post #15442 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

It's a sole oil recipe. 


Where can I get such a thing?

post #15443 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by mediahound View Post
 


Where can I get such a thing?

You can use neatsfoot oil in place, or Obenauf's oil if animal oil is a concern. German shoe care brands like Tapir and Burgol have sole oils. 

 

Generally, unless soles are under repeated wetting and drying, or else, oils are not to be used. Fancy thing it is, but misuse can lead to leather soles' disintegration.  

post #15444 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Water's pH is basically neutral. Not much of a harm, though, to be real. Unless the leather was not treated, I'd be worry of hardening afterwards.

Rancidity needs a whole lot to occur, Pat. It's a whole clusterfuck of moisture, storage/wear condition, how the ingredient was extracted, how was it used, and many more. Cod oil turns rancid in order for reversed waxed calf to be completed, and that cannot be labeled as rancid, because without the oxidized oil, waxed calf will sure be a grease ball. Linseed oil goes oxidized leaving a glossy surface. It doesn't necessarily stick to the principle that all oils that oxidize will go rancid, Pat. 

As of aromatic oils, read Russian Empire Leather (not the communist kersey stuff that was basically pleather). They used birch tar oil (I have a bottle). The stuff from sunken ship in England will speak for me, Pat.

Aromatic oils aid in preventing bacteria growth and infection, which is the prime factor of mold and rancid to set on. Other than that, oxidized oils doesn't really make a high school drama, in addition to a proper wax sealant, can prevent premature oxidation at its best.

Water has a pH of 7 assuming it is pure, that is 1,000 times higher than the isoelectric point of leather's protein fibers.

I still think the use of dubbin and Glen's cream is overkill. I don't know how much benefit you're getting by using that dubbin vs. Glen's cream alone.
post #15445 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

It's a sole oil recipe. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mediahound View Post


Where can I get such a thing?

Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

You can use neatsfoot oil in place, or Obenauf's oil if animal oil is a concern. German shoe care brands like Tapir and Burgol have sole oils. 

Generally, unless soles are under repeated wetting and drying, or else, oils are not to be used. Fancy thing it is, but misuse can lead to leather soles' disintegration.  

There's no reason to do this unless you want your soles to wear out faster. It is purely aesthetic.
post #15446 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

You can use neatsfoot oil in place, or Obenauf's oil if animal oil is a concern. German shoe care brands like Tapir and Burgol have sole oils. 

 

Generally, unless soles are under repeated wetting and drying, or else, oils are not to be used. Fancy thing it is, but misuse can lead to leather soles' disintegration.  

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post




There's no reason to do this unless you want your soles to wear out faster. It is purely aesthetic.


Thanks guys. So there is nothing I can put on the soles that will make them look better but that is also good for them?

post #15447 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


Water has a pH of 7 assuming it is pure, that is 1,000 times higher than the isoelectric point of leather's protein fibers.

I still think the use of dubbin and Glen's cream is overkill. I don't know how much benefit you're getting by using that dubbin vs. Glen's cream alone.

If I use Glen's cream repeatedly, I'll get the phenomenon of over-waxed leather and sticky goo all over the shoes. It's counter productive. For the amount of wear and walk those shoes take per day, I'd say overkill is only 75% correct. 

 

Water does not hurt leather as bad as you think. Using water, without properly treating or handling the leather afterwards, is a true kill. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post




There's no reason to do this unless you want your soles to wear out faster. It is purely aesthetic.

Fancy little thing for those days.

post #15448 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by mediahound View Post




Thanks guys. So there is nothing I can put on the soles that will make them look better but that is also good for them?

Scuffed soles are awesome.
post #15449 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by mediahound View Post
 

 

 


Thanks guys. So there is nothing I can put on the soles that will make them look better but that is also good for them?

Best bet is something like a cheap extra brush to knock the mud, dirt, and pebbles out. 

post #15450 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


Scuffed soles are awesome.

Sometimes they get dirt on the carpet and I went like "Bad soles! BAD SOLES! SEE WHAT YOU DID THERE?"

 

:lol::rotflmao:

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