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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1029

post #15421 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by shoelover View Post



Is this something a cobbler could fix easily?

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Only a really good one, which would most likely resew by hand. Send them to B. Nelson.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Give it a shot.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by garland View Post
 

 

Are these AE? If they are, send them into recrafting and they'll fix them.


I dropped them off at my cobbler today. He is going to re-stitch the quarter to the vamp and reglue part of the vibram sole for $10. Said it was no big deal... Will update on the quality of the work when I get them back.

post #15422 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post




Speaking of which, I bought three of these exotic brushes - one goat hair from Collonil, one from Hanger Project, and the latest one was a Yak hair. I really had to put work into them in order for the hair to really give a shine. Way worse work than maintaining shell cordovan (LOL). For over six weeks, the first two is all about dish soap, next two is shampoo, last two would take intense conditioning with hair conditioner. It's all in all a royal pain in the ass to get them silky smooth and soft like how they were advertised. You have to take into account how many times the brush has got to be combed because some people who made these were too lazy to do so.

Unless anybody have a freak mind like mine, or else I'd say it's too much work. 

What shampoo and conditioner you using?
post #15423 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post


What shampoo and conditioner you using?

Suave from Walmart and Head & Shoulder. 

post #15424 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Suave from Walmart and Head & Shoulder. 

Why not use baby shampoo for pH neutral?
post #15425 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

Why not use baby shampoo for pH neutral?

I don't get the deeper message in your question.

Basically, when the item is all doused and soak with water, it doesn't concerns the pH anymore since water is basically pH neutral. It may not be anywhere as perfect as distilled water, but does not do any harm either.
post #15426 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Some of them can never be used immediately. You really have to wash and batter some of them shitless before they are usable. That being said, certain douche bag manufacturer coated the hair with some sort of weird coatings. 

What's your frequency of conditioning schedule? Since I use grease, I only condition once per year. The rest is left up to Glen's cream and moisture in the air. 

I don't really have a schedule, just kind of when I feel it needs it. Maybe a bit more in the winter because of the dry air. If I had to guess I'd say 4 times per year.

You use this term grease often. What grease are you using and why do you think since you grease your shoes you only need to do it once? Why is this different than just using glen's cream with coconut oil in it? I still don't understand this.
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

Why not use baby shampoo for pH neutral?

Hair has a pH of 5.5
post #15427 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


I don't really have a schedule, just kind of when I feel it needs it. Maybe a bit more in the winter because of the dry air. If I had to guess I'd say 4 times per year.

You use this term grease often. What grease are you using and why do you think since you grease your shoes you only need to do it once? Why is this different than just using glen's cream with coconut oil in it? I still don't understand this.
Hair has a pH of 5.5

C.D. Jarnagin Co's "dubbin" grease. Based on a very old fashioned recipe. They have two versions of it - tallow and cod oil or tallow and neatsfoot oil. I have the cod oil and tallow one. Grease provides long term lubrication with both the cod oil (immediate nourishment) and tallow (rub it in and it will lubricate the leather in the long run). It's also important that the shoes are thoroughly worn when treated. Occasionally, three to six months, with heavy wear, I may lightly apply Glen's conditioner to the leather, in addition to the (waterproofing) cream polish. The reason being that I do not just use Glen's cream is because since the cream has got to shine, the oil content was balanced out, not really enough for my need. I wear the shoes very heavily, despite rotations. 

 

Hair does have a pH level? Nice to know!

post #15428 of 19073

AE just released a new Chukka and they specifically mention CF Stead Suede.....I did a look up on them but any serious suede folks care to weigh in on the quality of it? AE Chukkas on the 801 last fit me terrific. I know many in here are familiar with tanneries names and quality.


Edited by Kahuna75 - 6/9/15 at 7:28am
post #15429 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

C.D. Jarnagin Co's "dubbin" grease. Based on a very old fashioned recipe. They have two versions of it - tallow and cod oil or tallow and neatsfoot oil. I have the cod oil and tallow one. Grease provides long term lubrication with both the cod oil (immediate nourishment) and tallow (rub it in and it will lubricate the leather in the long run). It's also important that the shoes are thoroughly worn when treated. Occasionally, three to six months, with heavy wear, I may lightly apply Glen's conditioner to the leather, in addition to the (waterproofing) cream polish. The reason being that I do not just use Glen's cream is because since the cream has got to shine, the oil content was balanced out, not really enough for my need. I wear the shoes very heavily, despite rotations. 

Hair does have a pH level? Nice to know!

I don't think your grease is necessary especially because of the oxidation issues with such dressings.

I think the waterproofing cream could possibly be detrimental to leather because it inhibits the leather absorbing moisture in the air, which leather needs. I haven't discussed that theory with Glen though. I guess at the same time it can inhibit water from escaping too. Who knows.

I think your obsession with grease is unfounded, however.
post #15430 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


I don't think your grease is necessary especially because of the oxidation issues with such dressings.

I think the waterproofing cream could possibly be detrimental to leather because it inhibits the leather absorbing moisture in the air, which leather needs. I haven't discussed that theory with Glen though. I guess at the same time it can inhibit water from escaping too. Who knows.

I think your obsession with grease is unfounded, however.

Pat, the thing about waterproofing cream is already discussed a few hundred posts back. It does not inhibit anything. The compound, a powdered clay, similar to blacking or pigments, was used, and water would roll off of such clay. It does not, again, inhibits breathability, moisture, or what not. Water does not soak or penetrate the upper through the use of this cream.

 

As of grease, it doesn't really work for everybody, and certainly, the results will vary gravely even for two successful users. Again, oxidation does not necessarily will turn something rancid, in addition to the fact that this grease has got an aromatic oil content in it, which would completely thwart any rancidity. 

post #15431 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Pat, the thing about waterproofing cream is already discussed a few hundred posts back. It does not inhibit anything. The compound, a powdered clay, similar to blacking or pigments, was used, and water would roll off of such clay. It does not, again, inhibits breathability, moisture, or what not. Water does not soak or penetrate the upper through the use of this cream.

Exactly, the chemical barrier prevents water absorption, which is actually bad.
post #15432 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

As of grease, it doesn't really work for everybody, and certainly, the results will vary gravely even for two successful users. Again, oxidation does not necessarily will turn something rancid, in addition to the fact that this grease has got an aromatic oil content in it, which would completely thwart any rancidity. 

I don't believe you. I get that you romanticize about old techniques whether tanning, or dressing, but I don't think they were necessarily better, just rather all they had.
post #15433 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


Exactly, the chemical barrier prevents water absorption, which is actually bad.

This is why the use of water during oiling or conditioning is necessary. We want a water content, but we don't want downpour, showers, or puddles to wash our shoes. I still run my shoes down the running water everyday, using a dauber to get the dirt out. It certainly works better when there is a waterproofing cream.

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


I don't believe you. I get that you romanticize about old techniques whether tanning, or dressing, but I don't think they were necessarily better, just rather all they had.

Don't really get the disbelief and what you mean here. 

post #15434 of 19073
His shoes are "thoroughly worn" before being conditioned. And oil penetrating and lubricating leathers in the "long term". Pseudo science.

Gotta admire him for fancying history, from wanting to recreate reverse waxed calf to using grease made from old fashioned recipe.
post #15435 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

I don't get the deeper message in your question.

Basically, when the item is all doused and soak with water, it doesn't concerns the pH anymore since water is basically pH neutral. It may not be anywhere as perfect as distilled water, but does not do any harm either.

Why would you subject your brushes to all those extra chemicals in shampoo?
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