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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1025

post #15361 of 19067

Getting some broader thoughts on this. I sustained a nasty cut to my AE Strand. The cut on the wider portion of the foot isn't so bad when my foot and weight are on it, however, that slice in the toe is somewhat deeper and does appear. See pic below

 

 

1)Has anyone had any luck with liquid leather type products to fill slices like this? Effective? not so much?

 

2) I've seen some postings about celluloid glue (which seems to no longer exist) and bone burnishers, but I don't think I can apply enough pressure to even get the two edges of the slice to meet.

 

3) Should I create (wait for) a patina to the shoe? Or bite the bullet and grab another pair?

 

Thanks in advance for the help!

 

edit: already asked a local cobbler, and he said the cut was sustained to the leather, so there wasn't so much he could do

post #15362 of 19067
Polish and keep it moving. This happens with wear, and with the right products, e.g. polish, you can fill in the cut. The shoe won't look brand new, but after wear, very few shoes will.
post #15363 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by yongsoo View Post
 

Getting some broader thoughts on this. I sustained a nasty cut to my AE Strand. The cut on the wider portion of the foot isn't so bad when my foot and weight are on it, however, that slice in the toe is somewhat deeper and does appear. See pic below

 

 

1)Has anyone had any luck with liquid leather type products to fill slices like this? Effective? not so much?

 

2) I've seen some postings about celluloid glue (which seems to no longer exist) and bone burnishers, but I don't think I can apply enough pressure to even get the two edges of the slice to meet.

 

3) Should I create (wait for) a patina to the shoe? Or bite the bullet and grab another pair?

 

Thanks in advance for the help!

 

edit: already asked a local cobbler, and he said the cut was sustained to the leather, so there wasn't so much he could do

Apart from cosmetic defect, which can be fixed with some cosmetic products - polishes and creams, there is no real problem. Use creams more often for color saturation to improve the appearance of the scar.

post #15364 of 19067

thanks all for the advice. Looks like AE will still get my money but at least it will be for a different style :P

post #15365 of 19067


Is this something a cobbler could fix easily?
post #15366 of 19067
Only a really good one, which would most likely resew by hand. Send them to B. Nelson.
post #15367 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Only a really good one, which would most likely resew by hand. Send them to B. Nelson.

They aren't worth sending off. Could I glue it down?
post #15368 of 19067
Give it a shot.
post #15369 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsofia View Post
 

 

3.  How should I maintain these shoes to keep them like their original state?


Your help would be greatly appreciated,

 

 

 

 

You applied to much polish in that area before buffing and it dried very fast.  

 

Keep wearing them, keep brushing them and enjoy the different shades given to it (almost museum calf), .....  It will disappear with time and new proper polish. Not a problem.:nodding:

post #15370 of 19067
Thanks for all the input. So it seems clear to me now that the reno loosened the black detail in the broguing, disturbed the vamp finish, and let the black settle in.

The crazy thing is i've now tested the broguing by using a q-tip with the tiniest amount of water and twisting it very gently inside one of the holes which easily blackens the q-tip. See photo below. Is this normal? Wouldnt all this black run like crazy if I ever got caught in the rain?

Anyways, I'm going to follow the advice about stripping the vamp in hopes to get some of the black off of it. I've already tried reno again as I now understand it has stripping properties. It did push the black around a bit but removed none. So what should I try? Acetone? Reno-mat? Keeping in mind the other shoe is fine and I of course would like them to look similar when done.

post #15371 of 19067
Acetone or reno mat is probably overkill for that small amount of wax on there. Try the least most invasive method first such as distilled water and vinegar solution 1:3 ratio. If that doesn't work try alcohol. That should do the trick. Afterwards condition with some Lexol and apply some cream polish sparingly and buff.
post #15372 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Acetone or reno mat is probably overkill for that small amount of wax on there. Try the least most invasive method first such as distilled water and vinegar solution 1:3 ratio. If that doesn't work try alcohol. That should do the trick. Afterwards condition with some Lexol and apply some cream polish sparingly and buff.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jsofia View Post

Thanks for all the input. So it seems clear to me now that the reno loosened the black detail in the broguing, disturbed the vamp finish, and let the black settle in.

The crazy thing is i've now tested the broguing by using a q-tip with the tiniest amount of water and twisting it very gently inside one of the holes which easily blackens the q-tip. See photo below. Is this normal? Wouldnt all this black run like crazy if I ever got caught in the rain?

Anyways, I'm going to follow the advice about stripping the vamp in hopes to get some of the black off of it. I've already tried reno again as I now understand it has stripping properties. It did push the black around a bit but removed none. So what should I try? Acetone? Reno-mat? Keeping in mind the other shoe is fine and I of course would like them to look similar when done.

I'd run the surface under water with a dauber lightly rubbing around. Most often times, these are water based colors, so water will take them right out.

post #15373 of 19067
Yes, but you want to control the pH. The vinegar does that. Also, tap water has a lot of minerals and such in it that can create other issues. Distilled water and vinegar is the trick.
post #15374 of 19067
"I'd rather shine shoes than be a Banker"
Lucy Kellaway, FT management columnist

http://podcast.ft.com/p/2754
post #15375 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Yes, but you want to control the pH. The vinegar does that. Also, tap water has a lot of minerals and such in it that can create other issues. Distilled water and vinegar is the trick.

Are there any kind of solution to remove vinegar's odor after using it? It kinda irritates me that vinegar leaves sour odor on shoes. 

 

Distilled water is DA SHIT in shoe maintenance, no doubt. 

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