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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1018

post #15256 of 19066

It looks the same, if not worse in the morning. The surface is rather rough too.

 

Now i got to wait till i get back home at night and do another round of polishing (this time like you said, with less water).

post #15257 of 19066

Question - does suede protection spray negatively affect the suede in any way?

post #15258 of 19066
Quote:
Originally Posted by mediahound View Post
 

Question - does suede protection spray negatively affect the suede in any way?

 

I can't speak for all suede spray, but I use nanoprotector on all my suede footwear.  It works remarkably well, and if there is a negative impact I have not experienced it. 

post #15259 of 19066
Quote:
Originally Posted by RogerP View Post

I can't speak for all suede spray, but I use nanoprotector on all my suede footwear.  It works remarkably well, and if there is a negative impact I have not experienced it. 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RogerP View Post

I can't speak for all suede spray, but I use nanoprotector on all my suede footwear.  It works remarkably well, and if there is a negative impact I have not experienced it. 

Thanks, I wonder about the Allen Edmonds one.
post #15260 of 19066

Not really sure where to ask this, but lately the tip/side of my left foot (pinky toe and lateral ball) feels rubbed with my shoes and is red by the end of the day. Shoe too narrow or too short? 

 

Instep and heel feel fine. 

post #15261 of 19066

I suffer the same with a pair of shoes.  In my case both: too narrow and shorts.:fu:

post #15262 of 19066
All of this talk about oils and grease and rancidification and such has got me thinking. Perhaps there are certain oils that while will oxidize and technically go rancid their properties while technically rancid differ from other fats/oils. For example, history shows us that whale oil was often used, perhaps the reasoning could be its continued "usable" state even when oxidized. I am curious if different fats and oils have different properties when they oxidize. Do we know any chemists here?
post #15263 of 19066
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

All of this talk about oils and grease and rancidification and such has got me thinking. Perhaps there are certain oils that while will oxidize and technically go rancid their properties while technically rancid differ from other fats/oils. For example, history shows us that whale oil was often used, perhaps the reasoning could be its continued "usable" state even when oxidized. I am curious if different fats and oils have different properties when they oxidize. Do we know any chemists here?

Remember this, not all oxidized oils will rancid. Boiled linseed oil, after oxidation, turned into a glossy lacquer coat. Cod oil in waxed calf tanning served a similar function, where the consistency gel up like a wax. Whale oil is essentially liquid wax (same property as jojoba), so, you can find some sense there.

 

Come to think about it, chances of rancidification is actually lowered when the oiled leather is sealed with a wax.

post #15264 of 19066
Rancidification is what happens when an oil oxidizes. The way I understand it it is saying essentially the same thing, or at least alluding to the same thing.
post #15265 of 19066
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Rancidification is what happens when an oil oxidizes. The way I understand it it is saying essentially the same thing, or at least alluding to the same thing.

Found this article that may favor your position. However, bear in mind that it takes environment condition, time, and other contributing factors that could lead to rancidification, as addressed later in the article.

 

http://www.oilsfats.org.nz/documents/Oxidation%20101.pdf

post #15266 of 19066
I am learning from this discussion...nor do I have a dog in this pit.

That said, several comments: I am not sure that rancidification and oxidation are the same thing precisely. Some oils do change for the better when oxidized--oxidized tung oil forms a hard "varnish" on wood. Linseed oil the same. Cod oil will become a gel over time. I've seen this on wood and leather...and of course tung and linseed oils are marketed to function exactly in that way.

And cod oil takes on a sweet, wholesome smell when it gels. Not really what I associate with rancidity.

I didn't see anything in Trav's article that specifically equated rancidity to oxidation but I did see that acids will inhibit oxidation.

Perhaps the tannic acids in the leather (esp. vegetable tanned leather) slow down or prevent oxidation and rancidity to some extent.

??
post #15267 of 19066
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

I am learning from this discussion...nor do I have a dog in this pit.

That said, several comments: I am not sure that rancidification and oxidation are the same thing precisely. Some oils do change for the better when oxidized--oxidized tung oil forms a hard "varnish" on wood. Linseed oil the same. Cod oil will become a gel over time. I've seen this...and of course tung and linseed oils are marketed to function exactly in that way.

And cod oil takes on a sweet, wholesome smell when it gels. Not really what I associate with rancidity.

I didn't see anything in Trav's article that specifically equated rancidity to oxidation but I did see that acids will inhibit oxidation.

Perhaps the tannic acids in the leather (esp. vegetable tanned leather) slow down or prevent oxidation and rancidity to some extent.

??

And thus explains why raw oils are always associated with vegetable tanned hides...

post #15268 of 19066
On the other hand I have a small bottle of whale oil (not sure of the species) that is at least 30 years old. It has been sealed for all intents and purposes for all that time. but it is rancid, no question.

And on the third hand, i have a jar of rendered sheep tallow and a big tin of rendered beef tallow--both of which are probably 20 years old at least and exposed to air on occasion that are not even close to rancid.

I dunno. But I am not convinced that oiling or greasing leather...even veg tans...with any frequency (like less than yearly), is all that beneficial.
post #15269 of 19066

Would probably be sperm whale oil, because that was the whale that they killed most back then. Sperm whale oil was once used in Horween CXL recipe.

 

I think the way they processed the whale oil made it susceptible to rancidity. If I'm correct, then whale oil, with its properties no different to jojoba oil, should be a liquid wax. Curious when it gets here.

post #15270 of 19066
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2836369/Family-unearth-amazing-vintage-shoe-store-locked-decades-inheriting-old-building-footwear-perfect-condition-albeit-little-dusty.html

Well at least in these pictures none of the upper showed signs of stress or dryness after 50 years of storage.

Don't see any reason to oil the uppers

Unless role playing new chrome tanned leathers as veg tanned.

Anyone uses veg tanned leather for shoe uppers nowadays? Pure veg tanned, not those veg tan chrome retan leathers.

BTW the resident vintage shoe guy here is @ishhinryu. Wonder what he thinks about Travers' conjecture...

Personally I disagree bases on my experience.

Travers don't seem to have enough first hand evidence, pictures, or experience with different shows to back up his conjecture.
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