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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1017

post #15241 of 19038

Hi all,

 

I got a pair of Alden 990 recently, but there was some problems of it. Anyone know how can I fix the problem? Thanks

 

post #15242 of 19038
Guys I need help! Tried the usual renovateur, cream then wax option. Got the side to shine but the middle looks diseased!
post #15243 of 19038
Probably used to much water while bulling, let them dry for a day and try again with less water.
post #15244 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


But you're not really answering the question. There's a difference between tannage and stuffing/fatliquoring. Stuffing and fatliquoring serve the same purpose, the fats are just introduced differently. Also, a tannery is a controlled environment, whereas a consumer buying a product to use on a piece of leather, well, isn't. I think some sort of emulsified oils in water is better for a consumer product because of the difficulty in overusing such a product, whereas an unrefined oil is very easy to screw up. This doesn't even touch the fact of rancidification of said oils and fats.

Pat,

 

Stuffing and fatliquoring works to achieve the same goal, no denying, but ends up with different effect - one's water resistant, one's definitely not; one age better, and one cannot age, but can retain the original cosmetic look. A vegetable tanned piece of leather will prone to be hardened and crack, while a piece of chromed leather can turn into pleather (at least that is what Horween certified in one of their conversation with Kaufman Mercantile). That is why, both in treatment and care, that vegetable tanned leather needs to be well cared with raw oils and fats, while chrome leathers take emulsified oils.

 

Now, as you know it, vegetable tanned leather will take either - raw oils and fats, or emulsified oils. Chrome leather can only take one - emulsified oils. It's easy for you to say that just fatliquors will be enough for consumers, however, traditionally, when leather care knowledge had not succumbed to advertising and bullshit products, people used raw oils without any screw ups. It comes to the difference of leather types and poor quality tannage that actually gives serious screw ups.

 

It bothers me a great deal that we are so overwhelmed by rancidification of raw oils and grease, Pat, while improper storage of said treatment or treated leather with emulsified oils can produce similar, if not worse, effect. The introduction of bacteria and mold growth as well as rancidification is less from oxidation but rather more so from exposure to humid conditions, in addition to products being deposited on the surface, from either not completely absorbed, or over saturation of the fibers, which caused the treatment to oozes out of the pores, or commonly known as spew. This can happen with the excess use of emulsified products, too, when the user relies too much on the surplus water content. Thus, if mistaken, the water content from the emulsified oils can actually cause harm as well, for excess water can produce excess moisture, and excessive use of emulsified oils can saturate the fibers just as bad as raw oils. 

 

After all, in usage and caring of any type of leather, the consumer cannot blame the product's fault, nor can the consumer play innocent on their lack of knowledge - even using a pen takes quite some knowledge. More often than not, the consumer will smear product all over the leather under someone else's influence, not from research and understanding, and only then to accuse the product of faultiness. Going easy is not the answer nowadays anymore.

post #15245 of 19038
So what's one to do? Like I said, keep it clean and keep the pH in check.
post #15246 of 19038
I have a couple of .raw vegtan belts I made years ago they have been worn,buckled and unbuckled thousands of times .They have never seen a drop of conditioner yet the leather is still. supple and uncracked. I have worn work boots ( admittedly oily leather) through as many as three resoles without so much as a wipe down,other than the cobblers of course.The uppers, which weren't subject to mechanical damage , were still in great condition .Appearance aside I'm not so sure conditioners are nearly as important as they are made out to be
post #15247 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

So what's one to do? Like I said, keep it clean and keep the pH in check.

That would be the simplest prepping step. This is the only rule that should be enforce. However, it's hard to judge the pH of the leather, Pat, unless you're talking about water content and suppleness, not softness, of the leather.

 

If one proceeds to oiling, whether with emulsified oils, or raw oils, "fat on lean" should be exercised, along with care, patience, and a whole lot more. 

post #15248 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by englade321 View Post

I have a couple of .raw vegtan belts I made years ago they have been worn,buckled and unbuckled thousands of times .They have never seen a drop of conditioner yet the leather is still. supple and uncracked. I have worn work boots ( admittedly oily leather) through as many as three resoles without so much as a wipe down,other than the cobblers of course.The uppers, which weren't subject to mechanical damage , were still in great condition .Appearance aside I'm not so sure conditioners are nearly as important as they are made out to be

How was the leather treated after tannage? Stuffed? Curried? Or both?

post #15249 of 19038
It isn't really that hard to judge the pH of leather, especially if you are aware of what you're putting on it.
post #15250 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

It isn't really that hard to judge the pH of leather, especially if you are aware of what you're putting on it.

I suspect if many of them gets too acidic. The probability of anything being too basic is a lot higher.

post #15251 of 19038

Picked these up for $2.99.  Not sure of era. Can anyone tell me anything about this shoe?

 

 

 

 

post #15252 of 19038
If the heel pad is accurate, the uppers are not leather.

And every foot problem or disease that the previous owner had is preserved and recorded in the interior of the shoe.
post #15253 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by TWU2014 View Post
 

Picked these up for $2.99.  Not sure of era. Can anyone tell me anything about this shoe?

 

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

Looks like a most shell cordovan :)

 

http://brandfailures.blogspot.com/2006/11/brand-idea-failures-corfam.html

post #15254 of 19038

Mmm, pleather.

post #15255 of 19038
I've got a pair of chukkas that I'd like to have the eyelets replaced on. They appear to be aluminum under the worn-off paint, and I'd like the have them replaced with brass. There are six eyelets per chukka.
I'm going to find and call a shoe repair store tomorrow. (The one in our town closed a few years ago.)
Can anyone give me a rough estimate for a fair price?
They're Red Wings, if that makes a difference.
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