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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1014

post #15196 of 19072
Dubbin should be used over the entire shoe shouldn't it? You then apply a shine (wax) over that correct? Dubbin alone produces a dull look.
post #15197 of 19072
Some will disagree with me, but I don't recommend using dubbin on dress shoes, especially if the leather has a topcoat of sort. You might risk even over saturating the leather and they won't be able to take a shine, period.
post #15198 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Some will disagree with me, but I don't recommend using dubbin on dress shoes, especially if the leather has a topcoat of sort. You might risk even over saturating the leather and they won't be able to take a shine, period.

Quoted for insight.

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post #15199 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Quoted for insight.

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post #15200 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jorge View Post

Dubbin should be used over the entire shoe shouldn't it? You then apply a shine (wax) over that correct? Dubbin alone produces a dull look.

No. Leather will be stuffed with oil grease and you won't be able to raise a shine.

Imagine pouring baby oil all over your car/marbled floor/wooden furniture before you wax. It just won't work. Leather don't dry out as fast as people imagined.
post #15201 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

No. Leather will be stuffed with oil grease and you won't be able to raise a shine.

Imagine pouring baby oil all over your car/marbled floor/wooden furniture before you wax. It just won't work. Leather don't dry out as fast as people imagined.
Right, so what Benhour referred to earlier would produce a matte look. Thanks chogall,

Benhour could you comment on the circumstances when you find this beneficial, I agree with PB that on most dress shoes this wouldn't be attractive.
post #15202 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

No. Leather will be stuffed with oil grease and you won't be able to raise a shine.

Imagine pouring baby oil all over your car/marbled floor/wooden furniture before you wax. It just won't work. Leather don't dry out as fast as people imagined.

quoted for clarity.

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post #15203 of 19072

 A very big hello to all Gents here!!

 

 I ll try to be as specific as i can be (language translation barrier is always here) 

 

 Firstly i would like to make as clear as possible the procedure i follow when i use Dubbin(I can understand it's quit tricky as a product when it's not used on oily leather) !! When i say less is more  with Dubbin i really mean that( really really few product used in every application) !! 

 The application is made with bare hands (more to control how much product is used and take advantage of the body heat) ! You just pass your finger through the surface of the can ( at 25Co you dont need any rubbing at all) and you are ok for the entire vamp! Then with fast motions you apply it at the vamp!! After that you can massage it a little ! After about 12-24hours you are good to buff and rise a shine (most dubbin products has bees wax in them so you wont need any more wax to shine)!

 Here  i have to mention that Patrick and DWFII are right!If the shoes have some kind of silicon-plastic coating on them dubbin ll stay on top!!(i think its not a really big problem, you can wipe it off by using a paper roll from your kitchen ( already done it once) )

 Finally i use it only at the  Vamp area and not at the whole shoe!  

 

http://cdn.styleforum.net/c/ce/ce418a07_IMG_1417.jpeg

post #15204 of 19072
Thank you benhour for your detailed reply, forgive me but I'm still not clear on the benefits. Is it the mottling that the dubbin provides?
post #15205 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jorge View Post

Thank you benhour for your detailed reply, forgive me but I'm still not clear on the benefits. Is it the mottling that the dubbin provides?[/quote

Dubbin, or grease, provides extra lubrication for the flexing areas. Provided with light coats, fully rubbed in, it will nourish the vamp far surpass any other conditioner. The oils will condition the leather right away while the tallows break down over walking and flecing, lubricates thr fibers further. It is one of the lost art in shoe care nowadays.

That being said, if you are npt comfortable with it, don't try it at all.
post #15206 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Some will disagree with me, but I don't recommend using dubbin on dress shoes, especially if the leather has a topcoat of sort. You might risk even over saturating the leather and they won't be able to take a shine, period.

The finicky thing with dubbin and grease is how your fingers have to get the "feel" over time, or as you used to put it, the fine line. It also takes extensive rubbing - in tanneries, they use a brush to apply the grease in curryong and rub the grease in until it is totally dry. The effort is worth it, but it's time consuming, and those that does not feel comfortable with it should not practice.
post #15207 of 19072

How do you polish tan shoes with other shades of brown through it?  I'm tempted to take one wax colour through it, but I don't want to ruin it... The shoe in question is this one: http://www.herringshoes.co.uk/product-info.php?colourid=3745&brandid=6&catid=156&shoeid=7070&sizeid=7&fitid=2&forceCountryId=6&gpl=1&gclid=CjwKEAjwnKCrBRCm1YuPrtWW0QMSJAC-5UYkElpfCohATCG3TfPtfz_OmlD6imQ8nP2L_gzdn7HVYhoC-_Xw_wcB

post #15208 of 19072
That color "chestnut" appears closer to brown than it does to tan. I would recommend a medium brown of some sort, and dark brown for adding to the burnish effect. For true tan shoes, neutral always works, and sometimes you will have to dig to find a close color match. Best of luck.
post #15209 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by smoothie1 View Post

That color "chestnut" appears closer to brown than it does to tan. I would recommend a medium brown of some sort, and dark brown for adding to the burnish effect. For true tan shoes, neutral always works, and sometimes you will have to dig to find a close color match. Best of luck.

 

Thank you for you're advice.  I ordered a bunch of shoe polishes yesterday in a range of brown colours (figured it would be useful because I want to build my collection of shoes). Thanks again! :)

post #15210 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Dubbin, or grease, provides extra lubrication for the flexing areas. Provided with light coats, fully rubbed in, it will nourish the vamp far surpass any other conditioner. The oils will condition the leather right away while the tallows break down over walking and flecing, lubricates thr fibers further. It is one of the lost art in shoe care nowadays.

That being said, if you are npt comfortable with it, don't try it at all.

Thanks that helps.
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