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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1013

post #15181 of 19870
After it has the shine I want I maintain it with my old, softened brush.
post #15182 of 19870
Quote:
Originally Posted by mr monty View Post

Shoe shine parlor uses wax polish on alligator and crocodile shoes to get a better shine. I always thought wax polish on exotic skins was a big time no?puzzled.gif

i use wax only at the toe area just to kick the shine a little more!! (try to use a wax with as few as possible solvents in it!!i think Glens high shine paste or Colonil 1909 wax are a must for that)

post #15183 of 19870
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nobleprofessor View Post
 

I know there have been reports on B. Nelson's restoration/resoling services. But, I was very impressed with them and wanted to share my experience.  

 

I had a pair of Alden Shell Cordovan Tassel Loafers that were pretty rough.  I bought them used for peanuts (relatively speaking -- they are still Shell Cordovan) and I knew they would need to be restored.  

 

They started out life as color #8.   

 

As you can tell from the pictures, they need some serious love. Alden previously recrafted them. One of the shoes has a soft spot in the sole (it has not worn through yet). 

The welt is also coming apart and the upper is coming loose. The cork footbed is noticeably worn as these feel like they have no cushion left. 

 

Here are a few pics of them before.  

 

 

 

 

I sent them on May 7th or 8th, on the 12th I got a call from Nick. He said they received them and he was calling because he wanted to make sure I knew they would have to replace the welt. Of course, I was aware of that. It cost an extra $40. I said no problem.  I got them back on May 22nd! So, it was two weeks from the time I mailed them! That is pretty fast considering they spent a 2-3 days in the mail both ways! 


I think they look very good! 

It arrived in the priority mail shoe box I sent them in. They were wrapped with a note from Nick and a bag with a prepaid label for my next order. 

They did not refinish or polish them. I was aware that was an extra charge. So, this is how they look straight out of the box. I haven't polished or brushed them. 

And here they are: 

 

 

I was very pleased with B. Nelson's work on these.   

Looks like a completely different pair of shoes. B. Nelson did a great job on the restoration and resoling of the shoes.

post #15184 of 19870

Hello Benhour. Did you say, a couple of years ago, that you put a bit of Dubbin on the vamp of your shoes?  If so, do you still do this?  Best wishes, Munky.

post #15185 of 19870

This is a little off topic, but this group probably has more experience with leather and leather conditioners than most others.  

 

I have never used Bick 4.  I have read enough posts on here that I think I am going to get some.  But, has anyone used Bick 4 on leather seats in a car.   I have a couple 15 year old cars and the leather seats in one of them are getting hard and dried out.  I wonder if it would help? 

post #15186 of 19870
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nobleprofessor View Post
 

This is a little off topic, but this group probably has more experience with leather and leather conditioners than most others.  

 

I have never used Bick 4.  I have read enough posts on here that I think I am going to get some.  But, has anyone used Bick 4 on leather seats in a car.   I have a couple 15 year old cars and the leather seats in one of them are getting hard and dried out.  I wonder if it would help? 

 

Bick 4 is excellent on car seats. Bick 5 may also be required for extremely dried out and/or cracking leather car seats. Give either or both a try. You will not be disappointed. 

post #15187 of 19870

Just took some tongue pads out of a pair of loafers and the adhesive left behind isn't coming out, even with straight Acetone. Any suggestions?

post #15188 of 19870
Renomat?
post #15189 of 19870
Quote:
Originally Posted by shoelover View Post

Just took some tongue pads out of a pair of loafers and the adhesive left behind isn't coming out, even with straight Acetone. Any suggestions?

Most oil will remove sticker glue. For kitchen stuff a little dab of olive or vegetable oil on a cloth will remove sticky residue like that. For shoes though, you definitely wouldn't want to try anything that has a potential for going rancid if it soaks into the leather. Mineral oil is safe for wooden cutting boards though. I wonder if a little mineral oil on a rag would remove it. It almost certainly would discolor the leather, but if it's inside it might not matter. Anyone see any other potential drawbacks to using a very light coat of mineral oil on a rag to remove sticky stuff from the inside of a shoe? Never tried it, but might be worth a shot.
post #15190 of 19870
So put a decent shine with Saphir wax polish and the promptly scuffed them. Light scuff. Do I add more wax to restore a smooth finish? Strip and start over? And do you brush the wax shine after each wear (this is on the toe cap)?
post #15191 of 19870
IMO, that is what renovateur is great for. Just a dab about half the size of a pea and some swirls then a brush will bring life back to it.
post #15192 of 19870

Or, alternatively, one can just wipe down with a damp cloth, let dry, then buff with a chamois leather or chamoisine cloth. 

post #15193 of 19870
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred G. Unn View Post


Most oil will remove sticker glue. For kitchen stuff a little dab of olive or vegetable oil on a cloth will remove sticky residue like that. For shoes though, you definitely wouldn't want to try anything that has a potential for going rancid if it soaks into the leather. Mineral oil is safe for wooden cutting boards though. I wonder if a little mineral oil on a rag would remove it. It almost certainly would discolor the leather, but if it's inside it might not matter. Anyone see any other potential drawbacks to using a very light coat of mineral oil on a rag to remove sticky stuff from the inside of a shoe? Never tried it, but might be worth a shot.

I've had a similar problem. I went the rubbing alcohol/acetone route first with mild success but a lot of sticky residue remained. Since the shoes were cheap, I decided to use baby oil on a q-tip to dab the sticky areas. It worked well, but didn't get every single sticky bit since I didn't want to soak the lining. After that, I sprinkled some baby powder in the shoes and spread it around the remaining affected areas. The powder adhered to the sticky bits and stopped them from grabbing onto my socks. I haven't had any issues with them yet.

post #15194 of 19870

Hi All

 

I purchased a pair of these yesterday online any ideas on the best way to take care of them, polish etc 

 

They are Barkers Blair

 

A traditional wingtip derby with a unique twist. This Cedar Calf/ Check Fabric combination is a distinctive addition, Stormwelted on a 10mm Leather Sole.

 

 

Thanks

 

Carl

post #15195 of 19870
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

Hello Benhour. Did you say, a couple of years ago, that you put a bit of Dubbin on the vamp of your shoes?  If so, do you still do this?  Best wishes, Munky.

Hello Munky!! :happy: Yes i have said that and i still do this!! Always remember less is more with the Dubbin (i think i have mentioned that  too) !!  The only disadvantage i see is that its darkening a bit light colored shoes(tan and tobacco mostly) over the years , not a very big alternation in the color depth but there is one!

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