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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1011

post #15151 of 19044

What can I do to restore these AE Cliftons? I've gotten the salt stains out by using water/vinegar and am now looking for opinions on what to do next. 

 

 

 

 

post #15152 of 19044
Quote:
Originally Posted by wurger View Post


Yes, cobblers do it all the time.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by striker View Post

It is in fact preferable.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Not so much.

Topy relies on cement to hold it in place. When the outsole is worn in an urban environment, in particular, grit and even industrial chemicals such as motor oil, etc., get driven into the leather...into the corium.

Oils of any kind are a foil for the cement--never allowing it to fully cure.

All of this must be removed in order to get a good, stable bond. This is almost always done with an abrasive of some sort--coarse sandpaper, IOW.

The more that needs to be cleaned off the more damage is done to the balance of the shoe and to such incidentals as the thread that holds the outsole on the shoe. If a shoe has been worn for some time, the outsole will be thin in some places and almost the original thickness in others. Grinding away the outsole to create a clean surface, exacerbates the discrepancies of substance.

Yes, it is possible to put Topy on an outsole at any time. But if you understand shoes and the physical properties and characteristics of the components that go into a shoe, as well as the mechanics of the foot, it's not always advisable.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by striker View Post
 

Dear DWF, I have respected your opinions greatly but will offer in my defense my personal experience otherwise. 

 

I have had new shoes topied only to find that the shoe did not fit. Alot of times, a shoe's fit can only be determined when it has been worn a few times. Topying it new can be risky. Reselling topied shoes do not add value and it is hard to recover that cost. This is essentially money wasted. 

 

My own experience has told me that not topying first makes it easier to break into the shoes. The bending and creases from use makes it easier for the rubber to adhere without peeling later when one decides for it. Of course one could argue that peeling especially at the toe is a function of a cobbler's skill. Perhaps we are looking at a different timeline which explains our differing opinions. I have not found my outsole to be thin in certain places after a few weeks of use say less than 10 wears, likely due to my dainty gait. I also quite recently discovered the joys of combination of topy and flushed toe taps so even if the toe area wears away first very slightly has not been a problem for me.

 

As you already are aware, regardless of whether a shoe has been worn or not, the surface of the outsole needs to be sanded or roughen to increase the surface area for the adhesive to stick to the topy. Assuming that one does not use the shoes for hiking, walking on granite/ stones or stepping on oily/ slick and wet surfaces. Those initial wears before topy likely help then hinder. 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jurgis View Post
 

 

 

I don't think you two are necessarily disagreeing.  I think we can all agree that topying a pair of new shoes that haven't been broken in/a verified "good fit" is risky.  We can also all agree that soles need to be roughed up to accept the glue.  DWFs point is that soles wear unevenly, so if you do this to well used soles, you may end up with thin spots and damage to the stitching -- not good.  We can also all agree that anything that makes the glue not stick is bad.  So yes, if you wear your shoes on clean areas a few times to break them in before topying, that's probably ideal. Just don't do it too many times, or in chemicals or oil.  I suspect DWF is aesthetically against topying in the first place, being a custom maker.  If you want rubber soles, buy rubber, don't topy leather.  If you want leather, deal with its wear issues, and resole as necessary.  Now that I've put words in the mouth of someone more expert than I, I'll shut up.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mw313 View Post
 


good thoughts here. 

 

I agree in that if you like leather, get leather and deal with the work involved. almost all of my many shoes are leather soles of varying thickness. I have a few pairs with rubber soles like Dainite or Vibram but they were bought that way new to use in weather that may not be optimal for leather soles. I know that some people prefer the feel of rubber but in other cases, you could just buy leather soles and just walk outside in shoes/boots made for that and then switch into the proper shoes when in the office. Then you can get what you want right off the bat and don't have to worry about them. 

 

I don't like Topy in the first place, so that does bias me a bit. I only wear leather or rubber, but i also baby my dress shoes.


Wow! Thanks for the great feedback. I have a pair of very old Sears "Gold Bond" (pre-Florsheim) shell cordovan PTBs that I want to make my rain shoes. They have the original leather soles with v-cleat heel. They are definitely worn, but without any heel or toe deformation. I want to throw a Topy on them and make them the shoes I throw on when the weather is frightful. My plan is that this will keep my newer, nicer cordovan looking great. Please advise.

 

 

post #15153 of 19044

Took care of one of my favorite pairs today - my Allen Edmonds Walnut Shell Daltons. These are one of my more heavily worn pairs, so I felt they needed some TLC. They also have a few fairly large and prominent dry patches and areas of roughness, so I felt like they needed some nourishment. They also have a few small dark blue marks that bled from my UNIQLO selvedge raw denim jeans.

 

First, I wet-brushed them: I got them very damp with a cloth, and while they were still wet, I brushed them until they were dry. This didn't really do much except clear off the dirt and dust and grime, and helped take out some of the denim bleed marks. 

 

Next, I put on a latex glove and applied healthy doses of Bick 4 all over the boots, including the bellowed tongues (and inside the crease that the bellows form). I got the boots fairly heavily moisturized with Bick 4, and then brushed them down until the Bick 4 was absorbed as much as it can be, especially in the dry spots. By this point, the boots had lost most of their natural shine and were fairly dull.

 

Most of the nicks and scratches and dry spots were neutralized by the Bick 4 and the brushing, but I decided to apply some Alden tan paste wax, since they'd never been given any paste wax. The paste wax worked quite well and actually matched the color of the boots surprisingly well. I think it would work quite nicely on Ravello or Whiskey shell, too. I applied the paste wax sparingly, with a different latex glove, rubbed the wax to a dull surface all over the boots, and then brushed each boot for at least 5 minutes.

 

Finally, I buffed each boot with a polishing cloth, paying special attention to the toe, heel, and vamp areas. I then applied Allen Edmonds Chili edge dressing, which worked quite nicely.

 

All said and done, I'm quite impressed with how well it all worked. The dry spots/patches are nice and smooth now, the mottled patina is still present, but the boots have a nice luster and shine that's fairly tough for me to achieve using the usual methods.

 

It's especially fun when you're dripping in sweat after giving a pair of shoes or boots some care.

 

I don't have any before pics, but these are definitely the best they've looked yet.

 

The first "after" image is without flash, and fairly accurately represents how they look in most situations, but since it's already dark outside I couldn't get a nice natural light shot. The second "after" image is with flash, just because I think they look cool with the flash since it really highlights the variation in the shell.

 

6G8Mkvoh.jpg

 

VqvERM6h.jpg

post #15154 of 19044
I hate to disappoint you but the soles do not look like they are original ones but rather a half sole job. The stitches on the right side of the sole are quite worn down already and probably will come loose with the grinding required for the Topy.
post #15155 of 19044
I would not recommend that in this instance. This would be too worn and I would take DW advise on this. Also Shell looks really bad after wet conditions, although the waterproofing quality remains.

I use topies because half the time i cannot find a good cobbler to resole my shoes without sending them back to the original shoemaker. There are better shoes to use for inclement weather. Topies work if the floor is slightly slippery but if it is a downpour or heavy snow they actually making the leather "rot" from the inside. The sheet of rubber just mask it and the frightful weather will cause it to peel more quickly.

If you wish to make it a rain shoe, i would just wear it as is and then get a dainite when you eventually resole them.
post #15156 of 19044
Just had my AE shell MacNeils re-soled:
20150524_204323.jpg
20150524_204355.jpg
20150524_204409.jpg
20150524_204433.jpg
Cleaned them with a damp washcloth. Will let them sit over night, brush them for a few min in the morning, hit them with a light coat of lexol conditioner then more brushing.
post #15157 of 19044
Quote:
Originally Posted by JSO1 View Post
 

Took care of one of my favorite pairs today - my Allen Edmonds Walnut Shell Daltons. These are one of my more heavily worn pairs, ......

 

6G8Mkvoh.jpg

 

 

They look brand new to me?.

post #15158 of 19044

And now for something completely different.

 

inside the secretive world of London's sock club

 

 

Considering an infiltration, however I may need to up my ankle game first...

post #15159 of 19044
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapasman View Post

They look brand new to me?.

Thank you!
post #15160 of 19044
Hi guys, I'm not sure if this belongs here but I recently bought a pair of lightly used Allen Edmonds Byrons off SF from a very nice seller.

The shoes are great and in great condition, however, there is an abnormal creasing pattern on the left shoe which causes the leather to dig into the my foot when the shoe is flexed. This is only mildly uncomfortable, and I could probably live with it.

Of course, I want to know if there is any way to fix this, and adjust the creasing of the leather back to normal.

I have attached pictures of the shoes to illustrate the problem.

Left (abnormal):


Right (normal):


Thanks!
post #15161 of 19044
Quote:
Originally Posted by grnfy View Post

Hi guys, I'm not sure if this belongs here but I recently bought a pair of lightly used Allen Edmonds Byrons off SF from a very nice seller.

The shoes are great and in great condition, however, there is an abnormal creasing pattern on the left shoe which causes the leather to dig into the my foot when the shoe is flexed. This is only mildly uncomfortable, and I could probably live with it. Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

Of course, I want to know if there is any way to fix this, and adjust the creasing of the leather back to normal.

I have attached pictures of the shoes to illustrate the problem.

Left (abnormal):


Right (normal):


Thanks!

 

 

heavy douse of conditioner (lexol or bick4) with shoe trees inside should tone down the creasing.

post #15162 of 19044

There is a two pencil method that help to guide the creases in place. Not sure if it works on used shoes. But creases on the left and right shoe can be different and for many reasons. It is hard to say from your photos whether you were deliberately bending them to capture it on camera. One reason they crease differently is that your feet could be slightly of a different size. Also they may tend to crease more if you have low volume feet and the shoes have higher instep or are wider than your measured size and wearing them might dig into your feet. a shoe insert might take care of that by filling up the space. 

post #15163 of 19044
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chowkin View Post

I hate to disappoint you but the soles do not look like they are original ones but rather a half sole job. The stitches on the right side of the sole are quite worn down already and probably will come loose with the grinding required for the Topy.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by striker View Post

I would not recommend that in this instance. This would be too worn and I would take DW advise on this. Also Shell looks really bad after wet conditions, although the waterproofing quality remains.

I use topies because half the time i cannot find a good cobbler to resole my shoes without sending them back to the original shoemaker. There are better shoes to use for inclement weather. Topies work if the floor is slightly slippery but if it is a downpour or heavy snow they actually making the leather "rot" from the inside. The sheet of rubber just mask it and the frightful weather will cause it to peel more quickly.

If you wish to make it a rain shoe, i would just wear it as is and then get a dainite when you eventually resole them.


This is why I asked. Thanks for the advice! I will just wear them for now, and I love the idea for Danite as the replacement sole. What colors does Danite come in?

post #15164 of 19044
Quote:
Originally Posted by grnfy View Post

Hi guys, I'm not sure if this belongs here but I recently bought a pair of lightly used Allen Edmonds Byrons off SF from a very nice seller.

The shoes are great and in great condition, however, there is an abnormal creasing pattern on the left shoe which causes the leather to dig into the my foot when the shoe is flexed. This is only mildly uncomfortable, and I could probably live with it.

Of course, I want to know if there is any way to fix this, and adjust the creasing of the leather back to normal.

I have attached pictures of the shoes to illustrate the problem.

Left (abnormal):


Right (normal):

 I don't want to be rude, but aren't these beyond, reasonable, repair?  I can't see how they are 'lightly used'. It looks as though the previous owner had bought shoes that were too small for him. I can't really see a major difference between the 'abnormal' and 'normal' shots. I might be completely wrong on this and fully accept other views. 

post #15165 of 19044
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

 I don't want to be rude, but aren't these beyond, reasonable, repair?  I can't see how they are 'lightly used'. It looks as though the previous owner had bought shoes that were too small for him. I can't really see a major difference between the 'abnormal' and 'normal' shots. I might be completely wrong on this and fully accept other views. 

I am quite aggressively flexing the shoes in the above photos, to demonstrate the pattern of the creasing. There is very minimal creasing when the shoes are in their regular state.

Oh well, I think I best accept that this is part of the deal with used shoes; they have already conformed to the previous owner's feet and there is little to be done. They're great shoes though, very attractive and constructed very well.
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