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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1009

post #15121 of 19047
Use a cream polish to do so, but don't glob it on all at once because it will over saturate the shoe and won't shine. Just use a little bit each polishing session and let it build over time.
post #15122 of 19047

Thanks pB. Mid-brown or dark brown cream? I'm thinking the latter, in small quantities, as you say. A dab to let it build up over time.

post #15123 of 19047
Dark brown, id also alternate between that and maybe some maroon, or red, and even navy for depth.
post #15124 of 19047
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Dark brown, id also alternate between that and maybe some maroon, or red, and even navy for depth.

This is good info. A lot of people will put a dk brown cream over a light tan shoe thinking this will burnish the toe to a dk brown. This would be incorrect. The dk brown would mix with the lighter pigment of the leather to yield just a light brown and nothing less. Putting a navy over the lighter color is a much better option as this would contrast and give more depth. Then follow up with the dk Browns.
post #15125 of 19047
How well did my cobbler add these sole guards?
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

post #15126 of 19047
Walk around in them for a while, if they fall off he did a shitty job.
post #15127 of 19047
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Walk around in them for a while, if they fall off he did a shitty job.

Works for me.
post #15128 of 19047
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Walk around in them for a while, if they fall off he did a shitty job.

+1

Really. It's just a cement job...yanagi could nearly have done it at home.
post #15129 of 19047
post #15130 of 19047
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Interesting: http://www.nps.gov/Museum/publications/conserveogram/09-01.pdf

I read this a long while ago. After doing some analytic researches among the folks and the scientific facts, it actually made me laugh out loud harder than actually telling myself that I just got fucked.


Edited by traverscao - 5/21/15 at 4:26pm
post #15131 of 19047
(Duplicated)
post #15132 of 19047
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

I read this a long while ago. After doing some analytic researches among the folks and the scientific facts, it actually made me laugh out loud harder than actually telling myself that I just got fucked.

Elaborate.
post #15133 of 19047
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

I read this a long while ago. After doing some analytic researches among the folks and the scientific facts, it actually made me laugh out loud harder than actually telling myself that I just got fucked.

Well if you place your shoes in glass cases, of controlled humidity and temperature or happen to not bend your foot when you walk around in a clean room. otherwise I think the conservation lessons from museum conservation can not be directly transfered.
post #15134 of 19047
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


Elaborate.

It came, once upon a time, when people looked all over for stuffs that can "cure" dusty, moldy, and wrinkly pieces of leather, there existed three main products, including the Pecard Leather Dressing, the British Museum Leather Dressing, and various other greases and dressings employed by the common folks.

 

British Museum Leather Dressing was one heck of a legend within the curator community, especially in its home country. The United States, however, in lack of their own specific method, conducted research. With a strong business blood coursing through their veins, in addition to their background supplying their leather dressings to the adventurous Richard E. Byrd during his expedition to the South Pole, Pecard Chemical Company developed a sticker that said "Antique Leather Dressing" on their product, hoping to be approved by the museum curators. It was an era when people were so hyped into the stuff. Many had an orgy on how it "rejuvenated" their leather antiques. There were rumors, even written words from Pecard's retailers, that the stuff was used by the curators of big museums. The look of the dressing when it goes on the leather, soaked the piece, and give the leather some luster when buffed, it all gives the people that kind of arousal that will likely get you goosebumps.

 

However, just a few years after, people started to get spews on their antique pieces full of Pecard's goo on it. Some can be removed with a brush, some cannot, and some would exhibit rotting issues. The awareness spreads all over, as the article you just posted happens to exist. A few frustrating people gave Pecard emails. Some got funny response with "beeswax, other 'natural waxes', and pH neutral food grade petroleum" (I was caught on that bullshit, too), and a few people with concerns of the product damaging the antique pieces never got any responses at all. That was when Pecard officially entered the "Danger Zone".

 

Why am I laughing? C'mon! It's freaking hilarious! When a piece of leather is no longer in usage anymore (out of service, only for decoration), why the hell need lubrication for it? Why the hell stuffing it with moist, greasy goo when it no longer flex and move? I never put anything on a piece of leather that will sit on a counter for indefinitely, nor would I put it on a valuable piece of leather that will never leave the glass display case. The only reason I use Pecard, or any other leather dressings/grease, is because the leather is in use, in need of lubrication, and in need of a protector. Several amateur "conservators" were so smart to put goop on their leather under other people's influences, only to now blame others for the mistake that to should have avoid in the first place.

 

In conclusion, I LOLed at their stupidity rather than going around shitting on Pecard. Knowledge is indeed important, FWIW, and people need to stop acting on other's influences - it's not them who's putting it on, it's the owner's fingers. Hell, over half the number of these people may not even know that brush is actually the stuff they needed. It is rather laughable a story, and also one that needs to be kept an eye on. 

post #15135 of 19047
After long visits lurking from the recesses, I now make first attempt at a post. I took an old pair of over-polished AE's and stripped them using straight acetone. They were more dry and cracked than they even appear in the pics.


Then I used AE Conditioner / Cleaner twice, letting it dry over night.

Then I used cheap Kiwi polish I had laying around. This pic is after two applications.

The leather is signifcantly softer now. All I have to is rebuild the shine on the toe and heel. Which I am decidedly poor at doing.

Overall, the experiment worked well I think.
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