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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1002

post #15016 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by mreams99 View Post


I believe that these Bostonian Impression shoes are corrected grain. Those little cracks in the finish drive me crazy. Then I had an idea.

One down. One to go. There's no stopping now.

Looks pretty good. What did you use to strip the shoe. Also did you remove any wax first prior to using a stripping agent on the shoe. I only ask as when it comes to redying the shoe if there are any traces of wax left the dye will not adhere properly and a lot of times end up with a patchy and almost metallic look.
post #15017 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yellowevo84 View Post

Looks pretty good. What did you use to strip the shoe. Also did you remove any wax first prior to using a stripping agent on the shoe. I only ask as when it comes to redying the shoe if there are any traces of wax left the dye will not adhere properly and a lot of times end up with a patchy and almost metallic look.
I used acetone.
I've since added some conditioner.
post #15018 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Vinegar and distilled water 3:1 ratio. Get them good and soaked and elbow grease. Let them dry. If that doesn't work soak some paper towels in the same solution and stick it to the shoes. Cover them in saran wrap to control evaporation and leave them like that for a good 4-8 hours. Remove, let dry again. It that doesn't work there's one more option that is more invasives, but I don't feel like getting into it right now.

Thanks. I'll try that out.
post #15019 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by sleepyinsanfran View Post

And I have a question for anyone who's worn unlined shoes made of chrome-tanned leather for a few years - did that have adverse effects on your skin?
I have worn my pair last summer and didn't see any ill effects, but I'm wondering if the chemicals will start seeping out with time (I realized that only on SF might that be a valid concern haha)

Quote:
Originally Posted by AAJJLLPP View Post


I have never noticed any adverse effects. Granted it never even crossed my mind before you mentioned it.

I think it would kinda act like crocking on a pair of new jeans, and the chemicals would only bleed considerably when new. So if you wore socks when they were new, and maybe did a light wash of the inside with a leather cleaner. I'd imagine that would help even if the only difference it makes is peace of mind.

I really think it could only cause issues if you have very sensitive skin though. And in the grand scheme of your overall health I think it's negligible and your worries would be better placed elsewhere.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Chrome allergies are real and AFAIK once they manifest are hard to get rid of. I have made shoe/boots for several customers who had chrome allergy and could not abide any chrome tanned leather even when it was isolated from the skin by socks.

On the other hand, if you wore the shoes during the heat of last summer with no ill effects the chances are you'll not have any problems this year ...or at all.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

I dunno. The customers told me they had been diagnosed. What was described to me and what I saw was serious rashes.

That said, I'm a shoemaker, Jim, not a doctor.

Yes it is such a thing. It can affect people with "sensitive" skin as an irritant dermatitis or can affect people with allergies or specific sensitivities to the chrome tanning chemicals as what is called an allergic dermatitis.

They can show up right away but they can take a few wears to start affecting the skin because in an allergy response, the body has to mount a response to the irritant or allergen which can take a few times of exposure. If you have worn them a few times and haven't had a problem then I wouldn't be concerned.

If you start to have any problems like a rash or itchy skin, just don't wear them for a few days and you can use a Benadryl cream or mild topical steroid like hydrocortisone. That should clear it up and if not, then you would have to go to your doctor to get a prescription, but make sure to mention the type of leather in the shoe and the situation because there are not too many doctors whom I know that are very well acquainted with this, except dermatologist and podiatrists.
post #15020 of 19038
I've been working on refinishing these shoes. I'm not quite done.


Here's a picture showing one that has been stripped, and one that hadn't been started.
post #15021 of 19038

Started off as a pair of Mezlan's in medium brown.  Changed using leather paint.  Not finished yet.

 

Step 1

 

 

 

 

Step 2

 

Step 3

 

 

Step 4 

 

 

 

Step 5

 

 

This is my first attempt at painting shoes. I have several other pairs that I will change colors.  Practice makes perfect.

 

I welcome feedback, comments, and suggestions. 

 

Tony

post #15022 of 19038
crazy.gif
post #15023 of 19038

 

:butbut:

post #15024 of 19038
post #15025 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by TWU2014 View Post

 Changed using leather paint.

You mean like this acrylic paint?
http://angelusdirect.com/collections/paint

Regardless of aesthetics, I can't imagine coating your shoes in plastic would be very good for them. Most folks around here actively are trying to avoid the plastic coating of corrected grain shoes, not create it.
post #15026 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred G. Unn View Post

You mean like this acrylic paint?
http://angelusdirect.com/collections/paint

Regardless of aesthetics, I can't imagine coating your shoes in plastic would be very good for them. Most folks around here actively are trying to avoid the plastic coating of corrected grain shoes, not create it.

Many shoe manufacturers spray with acrylic coating as their finishing step...
post #15027 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by TWU2014 View Post



Started off as a pair of Mezlan's in medium brown.  Changed using leather paint.  Not finished yet.



 



Step 1



 



 



 




Step 2




 



Step 3









 



Step 4 



 









 



Step 5









This is my first attempt at painting shoes. I have several other pairs that I will change colors.  Practice makes perfect.



 



I welcome feedback, comments, and suggestions. 



 



Tony



More Mezlan than the original.
post #15028 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Is it the actual insole, or some glued on liner? My guess is the piece of leather used to cut that insole already had those holes on them, or like Chogall said, it could be due to the last. Is there a Mermin thread? I'd be curious if others have that as well on that last in that size. Curious more than anything.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

A wild guess would be that the insole was tacked or stapled to the bottom of the last and the tack was inadvertently left in while the shoe went to completion.

Then the tack has to be pulled from the inside of the shoe and that required some "rough stuff" and "digging" to remove.

An alternative would be that the tack in question was way too long and when it penetrated the insole and turned on the metal plate, it clinched over like a fish hook, anchoring itself deeply ion the insole. And thus, when it was removed...not necessarily after the shoe was finished...it tore some leather with it, just like a fish hook would if it were in your shoulder, for instance.

I dunno..clearly not "best practices" but not catastrophic either.

 

 I just got the response from the maker - "the shell monks, those marks, are related to the nails used to attach the insoles to the last during production. They won't affect the wearability in any case"

post #15029 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by JezeC View Post

 I just got the response from the maker - "the shell monks, those marks, are related to the nails used to attach the insoles to the last during production. They won't affect the wearability in any case"

What are they using? ... railroad spikes?
post #15030 of 19038
Nearly finished:
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