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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 998

post #14956 of 19068
Quote:
Originally Posted by mreams99 View Post

I've only done this with one pair, so I don't have anything to compare it to. Here's a picture of the process:

I really do not recommend doing this on a pair that you are not willing to ruin.

That looks great. How did you reduce the creasing?
post #14957 of 19068
Quote:
Originally Posted by gsgleason View Post

That looks great. How did you reduce the creasing?
It just happened on its own. I think the technical term for this is "magic".
post #14958 of 19068
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

It would be difficult to build up wax mirror shine on top of Robsons. Great wax for matted shine, hard to mirror or to use as base layer.

I was able to mirror shine on top of Robson, but it took little more additional work with the chamois leather cloth before spitshine takes place. Ridiculous, though.
post #14959 of 19068

I just purchased these shoes for $30 They are "GoldBond" shell cordovan blutchers. I am going to try to restore them to their former glory. This is an experiment to see what I can do. Any recommendations before I get started on them? I am not sure they will be much, but I thought they were worth a $30 try.

 

 

 

Processed By eBay with ImageMagick, z1.1.0. ||B2

 

 

 

post #14960 of 19068
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Savage View Post
 

I just purchased these shoes for $30 They are "GoldBond" shell cordovan blutchers. I am going to try to restore them to their former glory. This is an experiment to see what I can do. Any recommendations before I get started on them? I am not sure they will be much, but I thought they were worth a $30 try.

 

 

 

Processed By eBay with ImageMagick, z1.1.0. ||B2

 

 

 

Those could use a lot of conditioners. Make sure to strip them well first. 

post #14961 of 19068
Have a pair of White's boots in smooth brown leather. The heel of one is scuffed as hell, but the heel of the other is not. Boots were very dry so I applied Obenauf's oil, but that had no effect on the scuffs.




AnythingI can do to fix this scuff?
post #14962 of 19068
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigPoppa View Post

Have a pair of White's boots in smooth brown leather. The heel of one is scuffed as hell, but the heel of the other is not. Boots were very dry so I applied Obenauf's oil, but that had no effect on the scuffs.




AnythingI can do to fix this scuff?

You can try brush that up really hard, apply the LP in light coats until the scuff is largely diminish, or else take it as being worn. It looks more like abrasion than scuffs. Oils will do little on scuffs.

post #14963 of 19068
Quote:
Originally Posted by ds11 View Post
 

Hello,

I have read about removing polish with acetone or alcohol, though am wondering about reducing much of the shine of these burnished cobbler shoes.  I'm a little unclear on if this differs.  Does anyone have an idea of how to approach dulling this type of finish?  Here's a picture.

Thanks

 

 



http://www.barker-shoes.co.uk/daley/

Could deglazer work for this finish?  http://www.tandyleather.ca/en-cad/product/fiebings-deglazer-4-oz-2105-01.aspx  Not grain leather.

post #14964 of 19068
Quote:
Originally Posted by ds11 View Post
 

Could deglazer work for this finish?  http://www.tandyleather.ca/en-cad/product/fiebings-deglazer-4-oz-2105-01.aspx  Not grain leather.

Be sure to buy quarts, if you made up your mind. It's not like a few coats that can strip off that finish. Even so, I would not recommend you try.

post #14965 of 19068
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

Be sure to buy quarts, if you made up your mind. It's not like a few coats that can strip off that finish. Even so, I would not recommend you try.

Why's that - what's the risk - stripping too much and messing up the color?

post #14966 of 19068
Quote:
Originally Posted by ds11 View Post
 

Why's that - what's the risk - stripping too much and messing up the color?

The leather was made corrected grain for either one reason to another - the overall cosmetic defect, or else overall integrity of the leather needs to be reinforced with a man-made substance. Take that away and God knows what can happen. It's risky. If anything, the finish might be integral part of the hide, and stripping can cause damage. 

 

Also, be aware that you had a cemented sole shoes. I'd keep an eye open on using solvents. 

 

 

 

 

Let my influences remains as they are, however, for the fact remains that it is your shoes and you do what you feel right on them. 

post #14967 of 19068
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

The leather was made corrected grain for either one reason to another - the overall cosmetic defect, or else overall integrity of the leather needs to be reinforced with a man-made substance. Take that away and God knows what can happen. It's risky. If anything, the finish might be integral part of the hide, and stripping can cause damage. 

 

Also, be aware that you had a cemented sole shoes. I'd keep an eye open on using solvents. 

 

 

 

 

Let my influences remains as they are, however, for the fact remains that it is your shoes and you do what you feel right on them. 

Cool thanks for the input!  Barker says they are NOT grain leather though, so does that not mean they're not full grain, top grain, or corrected grain?  So does this make them split leather?  I don't want to strip far enough to affect the finish.  Barker receives the leather already finished and achieves the shine through burnishing during their shoe construction process.  I would simply like to cut the shine, not refinish the leather.  Couldn't a light treatment achieve this and even leave just a light layer of the shine so the finish is unaffected whatsoever?

post #14968 of 19068

I may be one opaquely speaking son of a b*tch, but that message they sent you gives off literally no transparency at all.

 

 

FWIW, most "cobbler's leather" should be CG, but with this kind of statement, I'd advice you not to touch a thing on those shoes just yet.

post #14969 of 19068
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

I may be one opaquely speaking son of a b*tch, but that message they sent you gives off literally no transparency at all.

 

 

FWIW, most "cobbler's leather" should be CG, but with this kind of statement, I'd advice you not to touch a thing on those shoes just yet.

Well they said their calf leather comes finished and they burnish it to get the shine. When I asked if it's CG she said it's not grain leather.  Wikipedia listed the four types of leather for me and three say grain so I narrowed it down to the fourth option. The website says 'burgundy cobbler' on the shoe page. I don't know if that's just something to do with the color, like how cordovan is sometimes used as such.

post #14970 of 19068
Quote:
Originally Posted by ds11 View Post
 

Well they said their calf leather comes finished and they burnish it to get the shine. When I asked if it's CG she said it's not grain leather.  Wikipedia listed the four types of leather for me and three say grain so I narrowed it down to the fourth option. The website says 'burgundy cobbler' on the shoe page. I don't know if that's just something to do with the color, like how cordovan is sometimes used as such.

 

I'm far from an expert on these matters, but I would say with very good confidence that those are made using a CG leather. A "cobbler" leather is just another nomenclature for CG. For example, Allen Edmonds used to use a polished cobbler leather that was nothing except CG. I would take the advice being given to you. Careful what you use on them. 

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