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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 997

post #14941 of 19073
I've only done this with one pair, so I don't have anything to compare it to. Here's a picture of the process:

I really do not recommend doing this on a pair that you are not willing to ruin.
post #14942 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by mreams99 View Post

I've only done this with one pair, so I don't have anything to compare it to. Here's a picture of the process:

I really do not recommend doing this on a pair that you are not willing to ruin.

Great work! Did you finished it with wax and creams or coatings?

post #14943 of 19073

Is there anything that can be done to repair/help with this scratch?

 

 

post #14944 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Great work! Did you finished it with wax and creams or coatings?
Yes, after the conditioner I used a couple coats of cream, then wax. I did a little more work after that "final" picture, and they now look a little better.
post #14945 of 19073
Could anyone give me some advice or personal experience? Perhaps it seems like a weird or stupid question but if you spend 500/600$ in a pair of shoes, I'd like to properly care them... There ir goes: do you lace up the shoes when you put in the shoe trees after wearing? I usually don't but I've noticed that if I lace up the shoes with the shoe trees in, then the shoee trees seem to adapt a little bit better, so perhaps it is a good idea to keep the shoes laced up in the wardrobe.... And then, how do you tie the laces of your oxfords and derbys? I tie them in a european(bar)... Crisscrossed underneath but bar in the upper side. Is this correct for both oxfords and derbys? Thank you very much guys in advance!!!
post #14946 of 19073
Derby's are usually/traditionally laced XXX

Oxfords |||||
post #14947 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Z-S-F View Post

Is there anything that can be done to repair/help with this scratch?




Yes, you can make it much less noticeable. You can strip the whole toe cap with a solvent and with a cream add some color and buff it out. Then I would start bulling the toe to fill in the scratch. That will make it much less noticeable, however if you are still overly concerned with it even somewhat noticeable you can strip them down and fill the space with Saphir's Repair Cream and then bull over it.
post #14948 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Derby's are usually/traditionally laced XXX

Oxfords |||||

I would most often go for >>>| on any blucher shoes, though. Is the chevron lace contemporary, though?

post #14949 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Z-S-F View Post
 

Is there anything that can be done to repair/help with this scratch?

 

 

There is this "home owned" brand, Robson's Beeswax Shoe Polish, which is a very thick paste wax polish that I would recommend. However, any shoe cream high in coloring content should be able to cover that up sufficiently. If the shoes are veg tanned leather, be sure to burnish the surface for uniform grain appearance. 

post #14950 of 19073

Looks great! Barker says their Hi-Shine isn't grain leather.  I see you had quite a lot of color change.  I'm not looking to strip much off the shoe, just to reduce the shine and keep the color.  Do you think that's possible?

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by mreams99 View Post

I've only done this with one pair, so I don't have anything to compare it to. Here's a picture of the process:

I really do not recommend doing this on a pair that you are not willing to ruin.
post #14951 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

There is this "home owned" brand, Robson's Beeswax Shoe Polish, which is a very thick paste wax polish that I would recommend. However, any shoe cream high in coloring content should be able to cover that up sufficiently. If the shoes are veg tanned leather, be sure to burnish the surface for uniform grain appearance. 

Robson's beeswax polish is way too think and don't solidify as well compare to Saphir wax polish.
post #14952 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post


Robson's beeswax polish is way too think and don't solidify as well compare to Saphir wax polish.

A thin, light coat serves well for the purpose of recoloring and sealing. It's a sealing paste wax, one that is better for brushing. Saphir's waxes are best for bulling, for what I've experienced. 

post #14953 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Z-S-F View Post
 

Is there anything that can be done to repair/help with this scratch?

 

 

I like your scarf, it is not that bad IMO.  Just keep brushing and polish them once in a while.  You will learn to live with it without any problem.

post #14954 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

A thin, light coat serves well for the purpose of recoloring and sealing. It's a sealing paste wax, one that is better for brushing. Saphir's waxes are best for bulling, for what I've experienced. 

It would be difficult to build up wax mirror shine on top of Robsons. Great wax for matted shine, hard to mirror or to use as base layer.
post #14955 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by ds11 View Post

I'm sorry that I cannot answer that question.
Maybe someone else here has that experience.
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