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post #14806 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


That's always been my impression as well but why? or whether that's good, I dunno.

I think it has to do with the consistency of saliva. It's thicker than water, and provides a lot more moisture. The only down side is the amount of enzymes going down there, for which, I think, the polish and the solvents would be adequate enough to handle.

post #14807 of 19069


Shining browns and blacks today.
post #14808 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

I think it has to do with the consistency of saliva. It's thicker than water, and provides a lot more moisture. The only down side is the amount of enzymes going down there, for which, I think, the polish and the solvents would be adequate enough to handle.

The problem with saliva is that the consistency changes based on when you have eaten or will eat. It can become very thin and watery when eating but thickens when you are not eating or it has been a long time since you have eaten.

This means that you would have to adjust use based in when you are eating because the "chemicals" in your spit vary.

I won't go too much into the science here but even from one person to another it can help or harm a shoe. My saliva is very acidic and probably could damage the shoe overtime so I just use water by the drop.
post #14809 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by mw313 View Post


The problem with saliva is that the consistency changes based on when you have eaten or will eat. It can become very thin and watery when eating but thickens when you are not eating or it has been a long time since you have eaten.

This means that you would have to adjust use based in when you are eating because the "chemicals" in your spit vary.

I won't go too much into the science here but even from one person to another it can help or harm a shoe. My saliva is very acidic and probably could damage the shoe overtime so I just use water by the drop.

Saliva isn't acidic. It's only 6.2 - 7.4. It's the enzymes that are worth worrying. They break everything down. 

 

Other than that, yes, the diet sure has got something to do with it. Some old veterans suggest take a glass of cold beer before spit shining.

post #14810 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Saliva isn't acidic. It's only 6.2 - 7.4. It's the enzymes that are worth worrying. They break everything down. 

Other than that, yes, the diet sure has got something to do with it. Some old veterans suggest take a glass of cold beer before spit shining.

Yes that is the normal pH range for saliva but it can be significantly lowered when someone has gastrointestinal problems like acid reflux (GERD).

In terms of the enzymes the main concerns are amylase which breaks down starch and lipase which breaks down fat. Yes they can have an impact by breaking down parts of the polishes applied to the footwear.

I was trying to generalize to not go over too many heads with all of the medical terms and details.

The funny thing is that the typical mash for beer is about 5-5.5 in terms of pH. I took mycology (study of fungi) before medical school so I would know some of the fungal infections and part of the course was learning how beer was made due to the use of yeasts which is a type of fungus.
post #14811 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by mw313 View Post

Yes that is the normal pH range for saliva but it can be significantly lowered when someone has gastrointestinal problems like acid reflux (GERD).

In terms of the enzymes the main concerns are amylase which breaks down starch and lipase which breaks down fat. Yes they can have an impact by breaking down parts of the polishes applied to the footwear.

I was trying to generalize to not go over too many heads with all of the medical terms and details.

The funny thing is that the typical mash for beer is about 5-5.5 in terms of pH. I took mycology (study of fungi) before medical school so I would know some of the fungal infections and part of the course was learning how beer was made due to the use of yeasts which is a type of fungus.

That should explains premature boot vamps breakdown and mold on boots in bad conditions.

We have little to no concerns for starch in leather (I wonder who would), but it explains the degradation of leather through the loss of fat content, since you mentioned lipase breaking them all down.
post #14812 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

That should explains premature boot vamps breakdown and mold on boots in bad conditions.

We have little to no concerns for starch in leather (I wonder who would), but it explains the degradation of leather through the loss of fat content, since you mentioned lipase breaking them all down.

Exactly! There is a chance that the lipase could affect things.

I hope my comment didn't come across the wrong way but I was just trying to keep things as general as possible because I don't want my comments due to my medical training to make me sound like I am above others. I hate when docs don't explain things with terms that lay people know so I hope that my comment showed that.
post #14813 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by mw313 View Post


Exactly! There is a chance that the lipase could affect things.

I hope my comment didn't come across the wrong way but I was just trying to keep things as general as possible because I don't want my comments due to my medical training to make me sound like I am above others. I hate when docs don't explain things with terms that lay people know so I hope that my comment showed that.

It's OK to explain things according to your understanding, sir. Sometimes keeping it too general could arouse even more questions, as a result.

 

I learnt more about enzymes in the the "game of leather" when I read Horween's CXL tanning journal post, FYI. 

post #14814 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

It's OK to explain things according to your understanding, sir. Sometimes keeping it too general could arouse even more questions, as a result.

I learnt more about enzymes in the the "game of leather" when I read Horween's CXL tanning journal post, FYI. 

That is no problem to have more questions to answer. I usually try to just define the technical terms that I use anyway but if it is way too detailed then I usually leave it out unless someone asks.

I hope that the posts helped though.
post #14815 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by mw313 View Post


That is no problem to have more questions to answer. I usually try to just define the technical terms that I use anyway but if it is way too detailed then I usually leave it out unless someone asks.

I hope that the posts helped though.

Sure did.

post #14816 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by mw313 View Post

That is no problem to have more questions to answer. I usually try to just define the technical terms that I use anyway but if it is way too detailed then I usually leave it out unless someone asks.

I hope that the posts helped though.

I just learned a lot that I didn't know. Thanks to both of you for the posts. You never know what you don't know
post #14817 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yellowevo84 View Post


I just learned a lot that I didn't know. Thanks to both of you for the posts. You never know what you don't know


that is great that you learned something and that is what I love so much about SF. We all can learn a great deal of things for each other and can also teach a great deal to others after we have learned it. 

 

Seeing some great pictures of shoes and getting ideas of new brands and styles to try also is nice though!!! haha.

post #14818 of 19069
I can definitely agree. I live in Dallas and there isn't a great shoe knowledge down here. I patina and color shoes and what most of my clients want is usually quite mundane or similar to what's already out there.
post #14819 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yellowevo84 View Post

I can definitely agree. I live in Dallas and there isn't a great shoe knowledge down here. I patina and color shoes and what most of my clients want is usually quite mundane or similar to what's already out there.


but you must see some crazy boots here and there. I saw quite a variety when I was down in Dallas last year!

post #14820 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yellowevo84 View Post

I can definitely agree. I live in Dallas and there isn't a great shoe knowledge down here. I patina and color shoes and what most of my clients want is usually quite mundane or similar to what's already out there.

Maybe people look into anything further than just color and patinas - durability of a pair of footwear that was expected to survive manures from equine and bovine animals, the sand, dust, heat, and even snakes, FWIW. Texan boot cultures are not much about patina, but unique combination of colors on one pair of boots.

 

Personally, when it comes to a pair of shoes, my criteria based primarily on durability of construction, materials (and this goes without saying, vegetable tanned leathers all the way), the ability to take abuse, and lastly, sensible coloring (black or blue). 

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