or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 987

post #14791 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Itsuo View Post
 

 

I use a pig-hair brush after every wear.  They look great after lots of use.  I've tried all kinds of erasers and brushes over the years.  The metal brushes are too harsh, but the synthetic nylon brushes are sometimes too soft and ineffective.  I don't use the protective spray, but I'm sure it will work fine.  ( I actually have a bottle of that Saphir branded stuff someplace.)  Something about spraying chemicals onto it doesn't seem like it's a great idea--over time.  

 

 

The forum needs pictures. 


The brush the SA sold me is a hybrid of nylon on the edges and brass in the center. Seems to do a good job, but I will look for a pig-hair one. Thanks for the advice.

post #14792 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darell John View Post


Man, you were actually serious about it.. I typically use a damp cloth to wipe my shoes prior to working on them. so while damping the cloth which I use my hands to transfer water to the cloth, because I want it just damp not wet..my hands inevitable get wet and of course I use the same cloth to dry them.. But I would never bother to actually use soap before.
After for sure because I use my finger to apply the products.

That said you must have a fit when people actually use spit to spit polish lol

Spit shine using actual spit is actually a fairly interesting topic.

 

Imagine you're in the 82nd Airborne, 1942, when you have to make your Corcoran Jump Boots so shiny it blinds the officer's eye in somewhere hot, dry, and FUBAR as Camp Tocoa, you don't think of using water, because water supply is so precious, drinking too much is already a problem, let alone using them to shine. Therefore, spit was thus used by troopers. A lore existed, even, that drink booze before shining improves the shine - sorry dearly respected veterans, I cannot help but smile to myself sometimes.

 

I don't harass people who use spit for traditional spit shining. God knows if they were actually vets who jumped through hell for us to enjoy good shoes today. Otherwise, it may just be habits - help people improve, if one can.

 

P.S: If anything, DW can tell us more about these.

I went through Basic in 1980 and they taught us true spit shining and using water as well...most of us just used spit because it was one less thing to worry about.

post #14793 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post
 

 

Dude, you gotta breath in less of that shit.

 

Solvent from Petroleum products is weak acid whereas soap is usually basic...


Where are you getting you're information from? I couldn't find anything backing up your statement that petroleum solvents act as a weak acid, besides it not even logical to be able to generalize all petroleum solvents as there is such a broad range.

 

Benzene, one of the more common petroleum solvents, cannot act as an acid. All the hydrogen atoms are very securely bonded to the ring, and it will not be stable at all in its conjugate base.

 

Next time, before you get up on your high horse slamming travers, try and get some valid information.

post #14794 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Betelgeuse View Post




I want to cry.

Take a cup of water for yourself (drinkable water, it stops you from crying), then dampened a piece of cloth, wipe it down until the whole surface is saturated, then let dry and brush your asses off. 

 

Nothing to cry about. Stains don't hurt nor kill.

post #14795 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Layered Player View Post
 

I went through Basic in 1980 and they taught us true spit shining and using water as well...most of us just used spit because it was one less thing to worry about.

Well, the tradition had time to sit in, sir. I afraid the old airborne of '42 in camp Tocoa (when the airborne, or paratroopers, were first formed) would not have such luxury. 

 

Which branch were you in service of, sir?

post #14796 of 19038
Well, just because I was in the 82nd Airborne doesn't make me an expert esp. since I came along about 18 years too late to have been at Camp Toccoa. That said I am having some problems with all this...

The 507th PIR was the only regiment of the 82nd that trained at Toccoa and AFAIK they were not part of the 82nd while they were there but rather part of the 1st Airborne TaskForce and only later assigned to the 82nd.

I don't know why there would be any water shortages at Toccoa. The Toccoa river flows nearby and the Blue Ridge dam (built in the '20s and 30s is in the vicinity. One of the few buildings still standing at Toccoa is the Municipal water treatment plant that dates from (or before) the war years.

I suspect...from a gut feeling based on first hand experiences...that bulling with spit came about from simple laziness rather than any lack of water. When I was in service we had plenty of water (I don't think you can train men or bring them to a physical peak without adequate supplies) all within a half a dozen steps, yet soldiers would use spit in preference to getting up and filling their polish tin lids with water. Even if they had a canteen at hand most guys still preferred spit.

Of course, there were those who considered spit unsanitary, and looked for other options, but not that many. Rubbing alcohol might have been more popular than spit or even water for those who were that fastidious.

Beyond that, it was my observation, every time I tried it, that it was far easier to ruin a good shine (almost instantaneously) with too much water than with the relatively small amount of spit that would ordinarily be applied.

FWIW...
post #14797 of 19038
I was in the military as well, and personally I always used water. Just a dab will do you though, the right balance of water and polish was always very important.
post #14798 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Take a cup of water for yourself (drinkable water, it stops you from crying), then dampened a piece of cloth, wipe it down until the whole surface is saturated, then let dry and brush your asses off. 

Nothing to cry about. Stains don't hurt nor kill.

Thanks! So let me see if I understood well, I should apply more water to even out the surface let it dry and then brush vigorously?
post #14799 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Betelgeuse View Post


Thanks! So let me see if I understood well, I should apply more water to even out the surface let it dry and then brush vigorously?


if you wash it down, let it dry, give a good brushing, and then polish it, the stain should not look at extreme. There probably will still be something there, but it will add character and depth to the shoes overtime with long wear and polishing overtime. 

 

That is how you see such deep colors on the toe caps of many older shoes. There are scuffs and other damages from spills, etc. that help shade the shoe with long wear and maintenance. 

 

I have done this and it does work, but don't forget that the effect will vary based on what type of leather it is!

post #14800 of 19038
Hi, everyone. First post on this thread. I bought a pair of AE Harrison calf leather shoes last month and been wearing them about twice a week in the office (I walk about 13 blocks to work). I always put shoe trees when I'm not wearing them, but they have developed creasings on the toe cap, as seen on the photo below...

W2Egp6ol.jpg

Can these creasings be repaired or smoothened out? Any advice would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance.
post #14801 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Layered Player View Post
 

I went through Basic in 1980 and they taught us true spit shining and using water as well...most of us just used spit because it was one less thing to worry about.

Well, the tradition had time to sit in, sir. I afraid the old airborne of '42 in camp Tocoa (when the airborne, or paratroopers, were first formed) would not have such luxury. 

 

Which branch were you in service of, sir?

 

USAF and DWF (howdy from a fellow Texan) is right about the laziness...getting the most done with the least amount of effort afforded us time savings better used doing important things like playing ping pong or sleeping.

post #14802 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Well, just because I was in the 82nd Airborne doesn't make me an expert esp. since I came along about 18 years too late to have been at Camp Toccoa. That said I am having some problems with all this...

The 507th PIR was the only regiment of the 82nd that trained at Toccoa and AFAIK they were not part of the 82nd while they were there but rather part of the 1st Airborne TaskForce and only later assigned to the 82nd.

I don't know why there would be any water shortages at Toccoa. The Toccoa river flows nearby and the Blue Ridge dam (built in the '20s and 30s is in the vicinity. One of the few buildings still standing at Toccoa is the Municipal water treatment plant that dates from (or before) the war years.

I suspect...from a gut feeling based on first hand experiences...that bulling with spit came about from simple laziness rather than any lack of water. When I was in service we had plenty of water (I don't think you can train men or bring them to a physical peak without adequate supplies) all within a half a dozen steps, yet soldiers would use spit in preference to getting up and filling their polish tin lids with water. Even if they had a canteen at hand most guys still preferred spit.

Of course, there were those who considered spit unsanitary, and looked for other options, but not that many. Rubbing alcohol might have been more popular than spit or even water for those who were that fastidious.

Beyond that, it was my observation, every time I tried it, that it was far easier to ruin a good shine (almost instantaneously) with too much water than with the relatively small amount of spit that would ordinarily be applied.

FWIW...

I stand slightly corrected, then, sir.

 

A video on YouTube with a guy using spit said it has more "lubrication", though I have trouble understand such statement.

post #14803 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Layered Player View Post
 

 

USAF and DWF (howdy from a fellow Texan) is right about the laziness...getting the most done with the least amount of effort afforded us time savings better used doing important things like playing ping pong or sleeping.

I stand much more corrected, then...

post #14804 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by LEgoiste View Post

Hi, everyone. First post on this thread. I bought a pair of AE Harrison calf leather shoes last month and been wearing them about twice a week in the office (I walk about 13 blocks to work). I always put shoe trees when I'm not wearing them, but they have developed creasings on the toe cap, as seen on the photo below...

W2Egp6ol.jpg

Can these creasings be repaired or smoothened out? Any advice would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance.

You can try rubbing the surface with something like Abbeyhorn's bone series, after an application of something like Lexol or Bick4. However, under a very short amount of time, it will come back, still, because, let's admit it, RTW cap toe oxfords rarely fits as good as bespoke, and this is just what happens on a daily constant basis. 

post #14805 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

I stand slightly corrected, then, sir.

A video on YouTube with a guy using spit said it has more "lubrication", though I have trouble understand such statement.

That's always been my impression as well but why? or whether that's good, I dunno.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**