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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 980

post #14686 of 14696

Using stuff to remove stuff before applying other stuff seems rather unnecessary.  Brush the damn things, and wear them.  If there's any excess polish or finish on them, it will wear away just fine.

 

Anyway, going back to the OP's main issue, that one part of the shoe was a different colour to the rest, that's just the natura of the beast.  And removing the finish will probably emphasise the variation rather than reduce it.  Shells do not have even colour; that's part of the charm.  And with a mass produced shoe, it might well not even have been from the same shell.  Horween's "Colour 8" varies from dark oxblood to port wine to quite a bright bloody red.  Every shell is different.  Learn to love it.

post #14687 of 14696
Quote:
Originally Posted by mimo View Post
 

Using stuff to remove stuff before applying other stuff seems rather unnecessary.  Brush the damn things, and wear them.  If there's any excess polish or finish on them, it will wear away just fine.

 

Anyway, going back to the OP's main issue, that one part of the shoe was a different colour to the rest, that's just the natura of the beast.  And removing the finish will probably emphasise the variation rather than reduce it.  Shells do not have even colour; that's part of the charm.  And with a mass produced shoe, it might well not even have been from the same shell.  Horween's "Colour 8" varies from dark oxblood to port wine to quite a bright bloody red.  Every shell is different.  Learn to love it.

Ah! You just addressed your concern within your own quotes. Look, they tried to even out the difference in color. But guess what, they dumped truck loads of inks on the surface. Now, what does sticky surface inks do that we are all trying so hard to avoid? Brushing isn't going to help, and the application of a better product is more than necessary. If it's excess polish, who cares? But, it isn't.

 

The difference in coloration is all due to different lighting. Hell, even the shine varies from the left boot/shoe to the right.

post #14688 of 14696

The difference in colour is most likely due to a difference in colour.

post #14689 of 14696
I can't figure out what the hell happened to these shoes, and no one will fess up.

Veg tanned Buttero sneakers that look stained. Maybe by water (no salt stains). Any ideas on how to fix?

post #14690 of 14696
pour a bottle of bourgogne in the other shoe and they will match just fine smile.gif
post #14691 of 14696
Quote:
Originally Posted by DinSko View Post

pour a bottle of bourgogne in the other shoe and they will match just fine smile.gif

That might be what happened to the left shoe. Who knows with kids.
post #14692 of 14696
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerrybrowne View Post

I can't figure out what the hell happened to these shoes, and no one will fess up.

Veg tanned Buttero sneakers that look stained. Maybe by water (no salt stains). Any ideas on how to fix?


Try good old vinegar and distilled water. 3:1 ratio. They might have to be soaked in it with paper towels stuck to them and saran wrap over the paper towels to control evaporation. Generally spots like that when dry is due to over-alkaline exposure so acidifying them while having something absorbent can extract and transfer the soiling to the paper towel.

Rubbing with vinegar should be step one though.
post #14693 of 14696
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Try good old vinegar and distilled water. 3:1 ratio. They might have to be soaked in it with paper towels stuck to them and saran wrap over the paper towels to control evaporation. Generally spots like that when dry is due to over-alkaline exposure so acidifying them while having something absorbent can extract and transfer the soiling to the paper towel.

Rubbing with vinegar should be step one though.

Okay, thanks for the advice. I'll try that now.
post #14694 of 14696

I have read this thread a number of times and learned a lot.  I decided to try a project and I wanted to share the results.  

 

 

These are a pair of Church's tassel loafers. I bought these for myself (on ebay). They are my size and I like them. I want to save them if I can. 

They are supposed to be a burgundy color. As you can tell from the pictures they need some real work. I couldn't figure out if they just have years of excess polish on them or something else. It's like the finish is almost flaking off. I remember years ago there was a company that had a spray on polish that really ruined a lot of shoes because it looked too glossy when first applied and then it would flake off. I can't tell what is happening with these. They are in okay, but slightly rough shape otherwise with original soles and heels, but they had some minor cracking and a few dings here and there. I was most concerned with all the flaking spotting.  

 

Here are the before pictures: 

 

 

As you can tell there is some flaking, but there is also some sort of staining. I think part of it is water staining and part of it is old polish.  These shoes were just not taken care of. 

 


I decided to try Saphir Renomat based on some suggestions I read in this thread.  This was my first experience with Renomat. 

 

My first impression was this little bottle of milky looking stuff isn't going to do anything. Then, I opened the bottle. WHOA!  I wish I would have known to use this stuff in a well ventilated room. This stuff is powerful. 

I used a clean terry cloth rag and added a dime size amount of the Reno Mat and started wiping it on the shoes. IMMEDIATELY, it started taking off layers of polish, color, dirt, grime, etc. I had to keep switching spots of the towel because the polish it was taking off was building up on the towel. I went all over the uppers. The gunk and grime was especially tough along the edge of the upper near the sole edge. A few times, it even felt like the old polish and gunk was getting sticky. 

I used a dime sized amount, but I had to reload the towel 3-4 times. So, I may have used too much. But, I noticed that it was really working and didn't want to be too stingy with this stuff. 

After the renomat, the uppers have a dull satin finish and most of the old polish blotches are gone. 

Here is what they look like after the renomat: 

 

 

I can still see some of the old polish and some of the blotches. 

After applying the Reno Mat, i followed the directions and let it sit for 15 minutes and then buffed the residue off with a clean towel or rag. 

Here is what they look like after buffing off the reno mat

 

 

 

The color is NOTICEABLY brighter after buffing off the renomat. The Color is also deeper and they look much better. BUT, as you can tell from the above photo, there are still blotches and spots of darker colors. So, I may need to try the Reno Mat again. 

I think after a second application of Reno Mat, the color should be more uniform and the leather will certainly be MUCH cleaner. After that, I think polishing and shining will make a huge difference in making the color much more even. 

My impression at this point was this is great (but very strong) stuff. If I only had minor amounts of polish to remove, I am not sure I would start with this. The leather feels much softer than before. 

 

After a few more days, I decided to get back on my project. 

 

I tried another round of Reno-Mat because I wasn't completely happy with the first result. I think the second round made a HUGE difference. 

Here are a couple of pics. The only thing I did was use the Reno-Mat and let it soak, then buffed it off with a clean towel. 

The majority of the spotting is gone (although some still remains). Overall, the depth of the color seems MUCH better. This is BEFORE I have put any polish on them -- Just Reno Mat and buffing with a cloth. 

Obviously, nothing will fix the cracking. But, I think I can still make them last for quite a while as long as I keep them conditioned, nourished and polished. 

 

 

 

 

I think this next picture shows how much better they look. Compare it to the first picture in the thread and you can tell how much it helped. 

 

 

Next, I tried some Saphir Renovatuer to condition them a little after the Reno Mat. 

 

For me, it has been a learning process.  

Here is the final result: 

 

This is after one application of Renovateur and then polishing with some burgundy cream polish.  
 

 

 

This last picture shows the same shoe as the first picture after the process was done. 

 

 

The total process was: 

Saphir Renomat buffed off after 15 minutes 

Saphir Renomat again (left on overnight) and then buffed with a cloth 

Saphir Renovateur applied and buffed off with a cloth and horse hair brush

Polished with burgundy cream polish. 

post #14695 of 14696
Well done sir on trying to resurrect an old pair of shoes. There is nothing worse than people who buy nice shoes and neglect to take care of them properly.
post #14696 of 14696
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nobleprofessor View Post
 

I have read this thread a number of times and learned a lot.  I decided to try a project and I wanted to share the results.  

 

 

These are a pair of Church's tassel loafers. I bought these for myself (on ebay). They are my size and I like them. I want to save them if I can. 

They are supposed to be a burgundy color. As you can tell from the pictures they need some real work. I couldn't figure out if they just have years of excess polish on them or something else. It's like the finish is almost flaking off. I remember years ago there was a company that had a spray on polish that really ruined a lot of shoes because it looked too glossy when first applied and then it would flake off. I can't tell what is happening with these. They are in okay, but slightly rough shape otherwise with original soles and heels, but they had some minor cracking and a few dings here and there. I was most concerned with all the flaking spotting.  

 

Here are the before pictures: 

 

 

As you can tell there is some flaking, but there is also some sort of staining. I think part of it is water staining and part of it is old polish.  These shoes were just not taken care of. 

 


I decided to try Saphir Renomat based on some suggestions I read in this thread.  This was my first experience with Renomat. 

 

My first impression was this little bottle of milky looking stuff isn't going to do anything. Then, I opened the bottle. WHOA!  I wish I would have known to use this stuff in a well ventilated room. This stuff is powerful. 

I used a clean terry cloth rag and added a dime size amount of the Reno Mat and started wiping it on the shoes. IMMEDIATELY, it started taking off layers of polish, color, dirt, grime, etc. I had to keep switching spots of the towel because the polish it was taking off was building up on the towel. I went all over the uppers. The gunk and grime was especially tough along the edge of the upper near the sole edge. A few times, it even felt like the old polish and gunk was getting sticky. 

I used a dime sized amount, but I had to reload the towel 3-4 times. So, I may have used too much. But, I noticed that it was really working and didn't want to be too stingy with this stuff. 

After the renomat, the uppers have a dull satin finish and most of the old polish blotches are gone. 

Here is what they look like after the renomat: 

 

 

I can still see some of the old polish and some of the blotches. 

After applying the Reno Mat, i followed the directions and let it sit for 15 minutes and then buffed the residue off with a clean towel or rag. 

Here is what they look like after buffing off the reno mat

 

 

 

The color is NOTICEABLY brighter after buffing off the renomat. The Color is also deeper and they look much better. BUT, as you can tell from the above photo, there are still blotches and spots of darker colors. So, I may need to try the Reno Mat again. 

I think after a second application of Reno Mat, the color should be more uniform and the leather will certainly be MUCH cleaner. After that, I think polishing and shining will make a huge difference in making the color much more even. 

My impression at this point was this is great (but very strong) stuff. If I only had minor amounts of polish to remove, I am not sure I would start with this. The leather feels much softer than before. 

 

After a few more days, I decided to get back on my project. 

 

I tried another round of Reno-Mat because I wasn't completely happy with the first result. I think the second round made a HUGE difference. 

Here are a couple of pics. The only thing I did was use the Reno-Mat and let it soak, then buffed it off with a clean towel. 

The majority of the spotting is gone (although some still remains). Overall, the depth of the color seems MUCH better. This is BEFORE I have put any polish on them -- Just Reno Mat and buffing with a cloth. 

Obviously, nothing will fix the cracking. But, I think I can still make them last for quite a while as long as I keep them conditioned, nourished and polished. 

 

 

 

 

I think this next picture shows how much better they look. Compare it to the first picture in the thread and you can tell how much it helped. 

 

 

Next, I tried some Saphir Renovatuer to condition them a little after the Reno Mat. 

 

For me, it has been a learning process.  

Here is the final result: 

 

This is after one application of Renovateur and then polishing with some burgundy cream polish.  
 

 

 

This last picture shows the same shoe as the first picture after the process was done. 

 

 

The total process was: 

Saphir Renomat buffed off after 15 minutes 

Saphir Renomat again (left on overnight) and then buffed with a cloth 

Saphir Renovateur applied and buffed off with a cloth and horse hair brush

Polished with burgundy cream polish. 

For the first month of wearing, I would suggest conditioner (like a lotion of sort) every two weeks, but from then on, a brush will be better friend than any treatments.

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