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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 972

post #14566 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

The ink from the paper is the actual criminal. I put my shoes in a warm room, rather than using newspaper, and let them air out for half an hour without trees. Once they feel dampened but no longer too wet, I put trees in and let them rest. Way more effective and healthier than news prints. 

Sounds logical. This just came into my mind after reading a shoe catalogue of Church's in which it was reccommended to dry shoes with newspapers. I wonder if anybody has ever conducted some research whether the ink penetrates into the leather (and beyond?) or not. Too bad I'm not a chemist!

post #14567 of 19073
Best way to clean leather insole from barefoot shoe wearing?

I've tried isopropyl ethanol, not yet vinegar or saddle soap. Or even wet twolette or hand soap?
post #14568 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by JezeC View Post

I was looking to resole my leather soled shoes and my local cobber presented me with two solutions: 

1) do a full resole for 85 bucks, meaning he would need to strip out the whole leather piece from the goodyear welt construction and attach a brand new sole. 

2) do a half sole for 40 bucks, meaning he would just cut out a portion of the sole and attach another piece on it.The  heels would be replace as well. The mid sole would be untouched and he's saying it's not necessary to do a full resole since the mid sole has no evidence of wear. The way he was describing the process to me, made it seem like it's the same process as a cobbler attaching a vibram sole on leather shoes.

how do you guys feel about this?  

Well, it's not the same as attaching a vibram sole on leather shoes. If nothing else, the vibram relies on cement to hold it in place and a leather half sole will rely on stitching.

There are good reasons why a half sole is a reasonable solution...

In the first place, disturbing the heel and the heel seat is never to be taken lightly. Especially when issues of heel spring and balance are so misunderstood and often so quickly dismissed. Most manufacturers nail the heel on to the shoe with nails that penetrate and clinch on an iron plate on the bottom of the last...usually five or more per heel. These leave "hooks" embedded in the insole which tend to tear out leather as the heel is pulled away from the bottom of the shoe. Taking off the heel can also damage a wood or light metal shank support as well if care is not taken. A half sole avoids all of this.

A half sole involves cutting off the outsole usually in the waist just behind the treadline. The leading edge is then skived (tapered) to match a skive in the back edge of the half sole. The half sole is cemented on and the forepart trimmed and sewn just as the forepart of a full sole would be. The spliced area is often nailed or pegged. Of course, the spliced area is the weak link in all of this--it relies on cement and nails (there's those "hooks" again) or pegs, to remain closed. If it even begins to open up, it will quickly accelerate to the point where dirt and moisture get in under the half sole. Used to be...and maybe still is in some shops...the splice was closed with press cement--which sealed and held the splice closed pretty well. But modern cements are somewhat unreliable esp. when exposed to oils and greases that abound in modern urban environments.

Also without a great deal of care...and, of course, awareness...the splice on a half sole can end up being thicker than the original outsole and effectively become an unhappy and unwanted orthopedic foot correction known as a "met bar."

So...it's half a dozen of one, six of the other. The half sole is cheaper and on shoes or boots where the potential to get hung up in a stirrup is minimal, perfectly acceptable if done correctly. The full sole is more expensive and when done correctly, probably not too damaging to the shoe or foot health. Not necessarily, at least.

edited for punctuation and clarity
Edited by DWFII - 4/11/15 at 4:41pm
post #14569 of 19073
I have searched the thread and could not find anythjng that completely answers my question: i am looking for the best substance to condition a vegetable tanned leather jacket.

I have used saphir renovateur on my shoes before: I dont want to use it on the jacket because I dont like the matte finish it leaves. The jacket currently has a beautiful glossy look.

Is there a better option? Something that contains no wax I presume, just animal fats?

I am thinking of simply using coconut oil from the grocery store
post #14570 of 19073
^ Bick4
post #14571 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cordohan View Post
 

Sounds logical. This just came into my mind after reading a shoe catalogue of Church's in which it was reccommended to dry shoes with newspapers. I wonder if anybody has ever conducted some research whether the ink penetrates into the leather (and beyond?) or not. Too bad I'm not a chemist!

The guys from Colombus shoe care (makers of the Bootblack shoe polishes) recommended to wrap tissues around newspaper before stuff them inside. Tried that and it still leeches into the lining.

post #14572 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

Best way to clean leather insole from barefoot shoe wearing?

I've tried isopropyl ethanol, not yet vinegar or saddle soap. Or even wet twolette or hand soap?

Have you tried lathering Renomat like a soap? It works wonder for me. Using the little Star applicator would reach into the deepest corners of the insole. 

post #14573 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by skeen7908 View Post

I have searched the thread and could not find anythjng that completely answers my question: i am looking for the best substance to condition a vegetable tanned leather jacket.

I have used saphir renovateur on my shoes before: I dont want to use it on the jacket because I dont like the matte finish it leaves. The jacket currently has a beautiful glossy look.

Is there a better option? Something that contains no wax I presume, just animal fats?

I am thinking of simply using coconut oil from the grocery store

Lexol is another choice.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

^ Bick4

DW, have you tried their Apache cream? I'm intrigued to give a try, but not yet until late July in CA.

post #14574 of 19073
Will bick4 give a glossy finish? I want it to look oily
post #14575 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by skeen7908 View Post

Will bick4 give a glossy finish? I want it to look oily

Alright then...Lexol-nf.
post #14576 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by skeen7908 View Post

Will bick4 give a glossy finish? I want it to look oily
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Alright then...Lexol-nf.

 

 

It will look clean and slick, no matter what. Stop looking for the non-shine phenomenon thing. If it doesn't buff out smooth, it's tacky and it gets dusty. If it is smooth leather, then all treatments needs to be finished cleanly. Or else, wear it till it cracks.

 

DW, even for Lexol NF, if let dries and buffs out, it will still looks clean and smooth, not shiny, FWIW. 

post #14577 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Have you tried lathering Renomat like a soap? It works wonder for me. Using the little Star applicator would reach into the deepest corners of the insole. 

I lightly use a denatured alcohol to clean the inside of shoes. Also works wonders but I might try the renomat.
post #14578 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yellowevo84 View Post


I lightly use a denatured alcohol to clean the inside of shoes. Also works wonders but I might try the renomat.

Alcohol can risk excessive absorption, FWIW. I don't recommend one doing so. You can mix soaps with denatured alcohol and water though. I did that. Worked OK, sort of like Renomat in its rawest form.

post #14579 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapasman View Post

By the way, could you tell us wich tannerie provides insoles and outsoles to Carmina?.  I wish they use veg tanned leather is their linings. Thanks.

I do not know. They are not always so ready to share this type of information.
post #14580 of 19073
I use it very sparingly and only up to the toe box just to disinfect the leather on the inside. I could be mistaken but I believe hasegawa from Brift H in Japan does a similar proces at his shops in Japan.
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