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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 969

post #14521 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leaves View Post


 
  • After 4-5 wears, smack on some Bickmore BICK4 with a cotton rag or a small applier brush, for conditioning and a bit of a shine. Buff with a goat hair brush. Repeat if needed.

 

Indeed they need so much?

post #14522 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapasman View Post

Indeed they need so much?

Usually not. But process takes only 30 sec so why not.
post #14523 of 19072
If I am not mistaken; too frequent use of conditioner might cause premature cracking as the leather fibres might be overly saturated. People have made a hyperbolic comparison between leather and cardboard; wet cardboard loose all structural integrity when wet.
post #14524 of 19072
This thread is an endless rant filled with hundreds of contradictions, repetitive posts, and pages of Uber hobbyists turning shoe care into chemistry and debating the science behind every little ingredient.

One would think at least some sticky posts for guidance would be warranted.
post #14525 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leaves View Post


Tony Gaziano said that the main reason they use chrome tanned leathers is that it keeps the shape better and that it's less of a hassle burnishing. I believe that it's just a matter of time before most places in Europe bans chrome tanning though, it's supposed to be shit for the environment. That's what I've been told anyway.

It will never be banned. It is only bad for the environment in places where they don't regulate the waste. There are strict environmental standards in America.
post #14526 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beach Bum View Post

This thread is an endless rant filled with hundreds of contradictions, repetitive posts, and pages of Uber hobbyists turning shoe care into chemistry and debating the science behind every little ingredient.

One would think at least some sticky posts for guidance would be warranted.

We won't agree on the contents of the sticky posts. I think they only think we can all agree on is that you should use shoe trees and a shoe horn, and rotate your shoes.
post #14527 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


We won't agree on the contents of the sticky posts. I think they only think we can all agree on is that you should use shoe trees and a shoe horn, and rotate your shoes.

Shoe trees + brushes + rotation, lol!!

post #14528 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


It will never be banned. It is only bad for the environment in places where they don't regulate the waste. There are strict environmental standards in America.

When you said it will never be banned, somehow it brings me a nostalgic smell of money and political involvement. A water treatment plan like ones from Horween would cost a crazy bunch of money, and so is the production of proper vegetable calf. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


We won't agree on the contents of the sticky posts. I think they only think we can all agree on is that you should use shoe trees and a shoe horn, and rotate your shoes.

As of the sticky post, why the hell did we call it a shoe care thread anyway LOL!!!

post #14529 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by cbfn View Post

If I am not mistaken; too frequent use of conditioner might cause premature cracking as the leather fibres might be overly saturated. People have made a hyperbolic comparison between leather and cardboard; wet cardboard loose all structural integrity when wet.

Too frequent use of an actual working conditioner will weaken the leather's overall integrity by loosening the fibers too much, but then again, something like saphir renovaeur is a mere polish, which can cause the phenomenon of an improper amount of moisture. 

post #14530 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beach Bum View Post

This thread is an endless rant filled with hundreds of contradictions, repetitive posts, and pages of Uber hobbyists turning shoe care into chemistry and debating the science behind every little ingredient.

One would think at least some sticky posts for guidance would be warranted.


In a way, I disagree.

The reason why there are so many contradictions repetitive posts, etc., is that people buy into the advertizing of the manufacturers. And that's true about nearly any thread or any product on SF.

Maybe the only thing that does make sense is to examine and analyze the ingredients...that's more than the manufacturers do. And then let the consumer decide whether he wants to put turpentine on his shoes. Or smother his shoes in grease...be it mineral grease or bacon grease.

As in almost every other circumstance in the world there's always an excess of opinions that have very little basis in fact or reality but there's also a few bits of common sense thrown in. If you're not ready to filter out the noise, you're not ready for forum life, much less the "good life"...the stylish life.

Who would decide what went into the sticky? The first group? The manufacturers? Who? Common sense advocates don't get much love here--too simple--too, well, common-sensical.
post #14531 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by skeen7908 View Post


Wow thats interesting, opposite of what I thought

Can you expand/post references at all?

I just so happened to be looking at a unique Alden Indy boot make up on Ebay that was made with veg tanned calf, and doing just a basic search of "veg tanned leather care" and "veg tanned leather water" on google, found numerous pages and quotes that seem to agree that it was more susceptible to staining and water damage. Again, I am no expert, but since I ran across this in the last 24 hours, thought I might just throw it out there… some quotes included:

 

 

 

"Vegetable tanned leather is very porous and susceptible to staining from water and …"

 

"...and does not discolor or lose shape as drastically in water as vegetable-tanned."

 

"It is important to keep in mind that vegetable tanned leather that is “unfinished” is not as water resistant as other tannages…"

post #14532 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carson View Post

I just so happened to be looking at a unique Alden Indy boot make up on Ebay that was made with veg tanned calf, and doing just a basic search of "veg tanned leather care" and "veg tanned leather water" on google, found numerous pages and quotes that seem to agree that it was more susceptible to staining and water damage. Again, I am no expert, but since I ran across this in the last 24 hours, thought I might just throw it out there… some quotes included:



"Vegetable tanned leather is very porous and susceptible to staining from water and …"

"...and does not discolor or lose shape as drastically in water as vegetable-tanned."

"It is important to keep in mind that vegetable tanned leather that is “unfinished” is not as water resistant as other tannages…"

Bo..o...o...o...gus.

All other things being equal...

Vegetable tanned is no more porous than any other kind of leather. It's the animal and the way it lives, what age it was killed, etc., that determines how many pores are in the hide.

Vegetable tanned leather may or may not lose its shape faster/easier than chrome when wet, but it is not as stretch-y and won't lose its size as easily as chrome. And veg tans take a shape faster and easier than chromes. So it's more likely to conform to the foot and stay the same size.

Any leather that is finished with a "paint job" will resist water and discolouration better than one that is not. Chromes do tend to be finished more heavily and in more and brighter colours than veg tans. A certain amount of that is simply the almost universal appreciation we have for the natural colour and aging attributes of veg tanned leather as opposed to almost none associated with chromes. Most of us would gravitate to that soft brown of an unfinished veg tan long before we would even look at the blue/grey of an unfinished chrome as being attractive.
post #14533 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Bo..o...o...o...gus.

All other things being equal...

Vegetable tanned is no more porous than any other kind of leather. It's the animal and the way it lives, what age it was killed, etc., that determines how many pores are in the hide.

Vegetable tanned leather may or may not lose its shape faster/easier than chrome when wet, but it is not as stretching and won't lose its size as easily as chrome and veg tans take a shape faster and easier than chromes. So it's more likely to conform to the foot and stay the same size.

Any leather that is finished with a "paint job" will resist water and discolouration better than one that is not. Chromes do tend to be finished more heavily and in more and brighter colours than veg tans. A certain amount of that is simply the almost universal appreciation we have for the natural colour and aging attributes of veg tanned leather. Most of us would gravitate to that soft brown of an unfinished veg tan long before we would even look at the chrome blue/grey of an unfinished chrome as being attractive.

NIce to hear about that correction. Thank you. I was kind of concerned after reading some of that stuff online, but I guess I can throw that out the window now.  

post #14534 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Bo..o...o...o...gus.

All other things being equal...

Vegetable tanned is no more porous than any other kind of leather. It's the animal and the way it lives, what age it was killed, etc., that determines how many pores are in the hide.

Vegetable tanned leather may or may not lose its shape faster/easier than chrome when wet, but it is not as stretch-y and won't lose its size as easily as chrome. And veg tans take a shape faster and easier than chromes. So it's more likely to conform to the foot and stay the same size.

Any leather that is finished with a "paint job" will resist water and discolouration better than one that is not. Chromes do tend to be finished more heavily and in more and brighter colours than veg tans. A certain amount of that is simply the almost universal appreciation we have for the natural colour and aging attributes of veg tanned leather as opposed to almost none associated with chromes. Most of us would gravitate to that soft brown of an unfinished veg tan long before we would even look at the blue/grey of an unfinished chrome as being attractive.

I believe that once vegetable tanned leather was burnished, it is actually a lot less porous than anything else. However, inadequately protected can results in its vulnerability in dealing with inclement weather or harsh environment.

 

One reason I love veg tanned leather is the rigid trait inherited through the tanning process. Breaking in can be time consuming, but in return, it is durable.

 

If a pair of shoes have to rely too much on coloration without any inherited characteristic of natural aging process, I don't see a real value in buying it spending a large amount of money. 

post #14535 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

We won't agree on the contents of the sticky posts. I think they only think we can all agree on is that you should use shoe trees and a shoe horn, and rotate your shoes.

I forgot about shoe horns, I take it for granted, but it's obviously very important. We get some returns requests from people who has obviously damaged the shoes by being careless and not using shoe horns and then claim poor quality. frown.gif
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