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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 963

post #14431 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

This might give a certain insight as to how soaps were used in shoemaking industry, which is still much a confusing aspect.

I wouldn't do it.

The thing that many are missing...over and over again, in a number of different discussions...is that when it comes to the details every maker has his own way and nine times out of ten it will be different from everybody else (except perhaps former students). And they will all be right...or close enough for government work).

There are many roads to the top of the mountain...but, mind you, it's the same mountain.

edited for punctuation and clarity
Edited by DWFII - 4/4/15 at 5:52am
post #14432 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post




I wouldn't do it.

The thing that many are missing...over and over again, in a number of different discussions...is that when it comes to the details every maker has his own way and nine times out of ten it will be different from everybody else (except perhas former students). And they will all be right...or close enough for government work).

There are many roads to the top of the mountain...but, mind you, it's the same mountain.

I got ya there, DW. I got ya. 

 

I like the way how you utilized Bick4, though. 

post #14433 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

I got ya there, DW. I got ya. 

Well, right. I probably use the Bick4 the same way and for the same reason as the guy in the video is using the soap. Or if not then I'm using stretching fluid or...recently...Hydrator 3.3 in the same way. And then Bick4.
post #14434 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Common phenomenon - whatevz they think works on their skins works on leather. Funny thought, regardless of how wrong it was, actually.

Are you being serious? What about any of my posts would suggest to you that I would make such an absurd logical leap? I was told to use diluted dove soap by the folks at Lobb.
post #14435 of 19073

One of the marketing pitches for Dove soap is that it has a neutral pH, unlike actual "soap".  So that might be the logic.

post #14436 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerrybrowne View Post


Are you being serious? What about any of my posts would suggest to you that I would make such an absurd logical leap? I was told to use diluted dove soap by the folks at Lobb.

Well, Jerry, look, I was not criticizing you or anything. If you took it that way, may I first apologize. However, I hope you take the explanation below.

 

Leathers tanned way back in 18th, 19th, and the very early part of 20th century was tanned, treated, and worked properly by tanners and curriers. In those eras, soaps were also made more naturally, with all natural ingredients, and thus, leathers can be cleaned thoroughly with soaps. As time goes, soaps, even those labeled "for leather", were made God awfully, and thus, believe it or not, soaps on leather remains no more than a phenomenon. 

 

While using Dove soaps makes my skin feels great, I doubt it would work on any kind of leather at all. I'd rather use some home made blends with tallow and/or natural oils. 

post #14437 of 19073

lol @ "all natural ingredients"

 

the pervasiveness that natural = better these days is mind-numbing

post #14438 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

While using Dove soaps makes my skin feels great, I doubt it would work on any kind of leather at all. I'd rather use some home made blends with tallow and/or natural oils. 

FWIW, I was taught that No More Tears baby shampoo was a good leather cleaner. It's ph neutral. I would recommend Lexol-ph above any other cleaner that I am aware of, for that very same reason.

One of my objections to soap...esp. bar soap...is the possibility of sticky deposits left on the leather. Saddle soap, for instance, will leave a film of tallow...or glycerin, depending on the formulation....which will collect microfines and accelerate the formation of cracks in the forepart of the shoe.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jaywhyy View Post

lol @ "all natural ingredients"
the pervasiveness that natural = better these days is mind-numbing

WADR, consider the antithesis...which I would suggest is even more pervasive.

All other things being equal, "natural" is almost always less harmful...to the environment, to personal health, to peace of mind...than "unnatural" or synthetic.

The real problem is, as Oscar Wilde said, "Everything popular is wrong." And we are a culture of "popular" impulses.

What is really pervasive is an almost universal unwillingness to think about anything for any length of time or in any depth. That's almost the definition of "mind-numbing"...especially when you consider that it's all self-inflicted.

edited for punctuation and clarity
Edited by DWFII - 4/4/15 at 8:34am
post #14439 of 19073

Off topic, for a moment. Johnson's 'No more tears' Baby Shampoo is also good for rinsing dust out of your eyes. I've used it myself and with patients.

post #14440 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

FWIW, I was taught that No More Tears baby shampoo was a good leather cleaner. It's ph neutral. I would recommend Lexol-ph above any other cleaner that I am aware of, for that very same reason.

One of my objections to soap...esp. bar soap...is the possibility of sticky deposits left on the leather. Saddle soap, for instance, will leave a film of tallow...or glycerin, depending on the formulation....which will collect microfines and accelerate the formation of cracks in the forepart of the shoe.
WADR, consider the antithesis...which I would suggest is even more pervasive.

All other things being equal, "natural" is almost always less harmful...to the environment, to personal health, to peace of mind...than "unnatural" or synthetic.

The real problem is, as Oscar Wilde said, "Everything popular is wrong." And we are a culture of "popular" impulses.

What is really pervasive is an almost universal unwillingness to think about anything for any length of time or in any depth. That's almost the definition of "mind-numbing"...especially when you consider that it's all self-inflicted.

edited for punctuation and clarity


That being said, DW, the baby soaps are largely liquid and penetrable, as oppose to the bar soap, made up largely of solidified ingredients.

I've heard of crown soap through the documents from those reenactor's sites, but the reality of it remains largely unknown. One of the alternatives today that I can only sparringly use would be the Murphy soap and Ivory soap.

In any sense, however, Renomat can be lather up like a soap, so, in whatever case, the crazy need of a soap for any smooth leather would be pointless.
post #14441 of 19073
@San francisco folks, where can i buy saphir in person?
post #14442 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by sinnedk View Post

@San francisco folks, where can i buy saphir in person?

Baltor & Sons
263 E Harris Ave, South San Francisco, CA 94080

Tell 'em DW sent you.
post #14443 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Never used otter oil.

Lexol won't blow up your boots.

Saphir...who knows--there's lots of Saphir types.

In fact, you can use nearly anything you want--no rulz.

Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Lexol is ultra safe, FWIW, for all types of leather. 

Specify the type of products from Saphir, as always, please.

Any animal oils can be use, but only if you are experienced enough to toy around with it, or else it can be a nightmare.

So i put saphir on the boots, leather shined up a bit but i ran out of saphir... dammit.

Now if i decide to use lexor or bick4 do i just spray down the boot and let it dry?
post #14444 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Baltor & Sons
263 E Harris Ave, South San Francisco, CA 94080

Tell 'em DW sent you.

Damn i just moved from ssf to sf, longer drive now, but thank you!

anything within actual sf, otherwise i have it in the mail already
post #14445 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by mimo View Post

One of the marketing pitches for Dove soap is that it has a neutral pH, unlike actual "soap".  So that might be the logic.
A pH of 7 is too high for leather which wants to be between 3 and 5
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