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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 962

post #14416 of 19213
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jurgis View Post
 

That's a little cryptic, traverscao.  I'm curious about your reasoning.  It seems to me that its value is in its potential uses.  The only reason to keep it as it is would be if it had some intrinsic value as an object in and of itself.  Do you recognize the stamp/logo?  

No, my friend, not really, although, judging by the name and the logo, it's a piece of antique leather tanned with tradition and quality "back then" in the ages where leathers were still the "best evuh". More so, with that little a piece of leather, I doubt if you can actually make anything out of it. 

 

You found a great piece. That was why my recommendation was to preserve it. But, for whatever reasons, please do take these as merely suggestions, because, after all, my influences should remain as influences, not the primary reasons pushing you to take any kind of action under it. 

post #14417 of 19213
I can't evaluate potential uses from a photo. With a stamp like that, it could be outsoling. But you said it might be a salesman's sample. You have to judge for yourself whether the temper and the substance are suitable for. You wouldn't ordinarily want to use outsole ingto make an axe sheath, for instance.

I appears to be oak tanned...says so right on the label.. which is good.
post #14418 of 19213
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

No, my friend, not really, although, judging by the name and the logo, it's a piece of antique leather tanned with tradition and quality "back then" in the ages where leathers were still the "best evuh". More so, with that little a piece of leather, I doubt if you can actually make anything out of it. 

 

You found a great piece. That was why my recommendation was to preserve it. But, for whatever reasons, please do take these as merely suggestions, because, after all, my influences should remain as influences, not the primary reasons pushing you to take any kind of action under it. 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

I can't evaluate potential uses from a photo. With a stamp like that, it could be outsoling. But you said it might be a salesman's sample. You have to judge for yourself whether the temper and the substance are suitable for. You wouldn't ordinarily want to use outsole ingto make an axe sheath, for instance.

I appears to be oak tanned...says so right on the label.. which is good.

Outsoling was my thought, to.  I've actually been thinking about trying some leather working.  For now, I think I'll condition it and save it until I'm more experienced, and can evaluate it's usefulness.  Thanks for both of your advice. :) 

post #14419 of 19213
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

I appears to be oak tanned...says so right on the label.. which is good.

What sort of bark makes the best tanning solution? I've seen chestnut, oak, fruit pods and tannery's "proprietary" blends, amongst others. 

 

Why is Oak Bark tanned leather said to be the best for soles? Do they actually strengthen the integrity of the hides/ make the pores finer or some magic synergy that cannot be disclosed. 

post #14420 of 19213
Quote:
Originally Posted by striker View Post
 

What sort of bark makes the best tanning solution? I've seen chestnut, oak, fruit pods and tannery's "proprietary" blends, amongst others. 

 

Why is Oak Bark tanned leather said to be the best for soles? Do they actually strengthen the integrity of the hides/ make the pores finer or some magic synergy that cannot be disclosed. 

Apparently Quebracho from Brazil was mentioned. The old Russians from their empirical ages also used Birch (spoiler alert - Russian Leather). For some reason, people said the Native Americans tanned deerskin using the bark of every American woods known - Cedar being one (improperly recorded, however).

 

One of my theory was that specific types of leathers reflect the specific type of element used in its tannage. Think about it - wood and chrome. If you have a nice piece of wood, oil it well, polish it good, it age nicely. If you have a chrome lined barrel from a rifle (just to be specific, duh!), sometimes you'd be worry even just to oil it a little. I do not know how idiotic it may sound, but, for what it's worth, I hope this is right to a certain point. 


Edited by traverscao - 4/3/15 at 1:39am
post #14421 of 19213
Quote:
Originally Posted by striker View Post

What sort of bark makes the best tanning solution? I've seen chestnut, oak, fruit pods and tannery's "proprietary" blends, amongst others. 

Why is Oak Bark tanned leather said to be the best for soles? Do they actually strengthen the integrity of the hides/ make the pores finer or some magic synergy that cannot be disclosed. 

Well, I'm not a tannery chemist but several observations:

"Proprietary blends" probably indicate some synthetic tannins. A lot of the "vegetable tanned" leather on the market is synthetic and yet they seem to be able to advertize and market it as "vegetable tan." It usually has a slight pinkish ivory colour.

"Fruit pods" are generally acorn caps (also referred to as valonia) and tend to make the leather flint-y and a bit brittle, in my opinion.

The old books ...specifically a book by a fellow named Waters(?)...on leather tannage and chemistry suggest that oak bark confers the best combination of durability, resistance to abrasion, and flexibility. It tends to be a deep brown in colour...at least in outsole and insole stuff. (BTW, "stuff" is a legitimate term for the raw materials that are used in shoes)

Quebracho tanned outsoling tends to have a slight pink cast and seem softer and less abrasion resistant than other tannages. I use some but advisedly.

Myself I prefer chestnut tannage for outsoling --it seems to have the temper and toughness of oak and yet finishes up better than oak tannage.It is often brown but not as brown as oak.
post #14422 of 19213
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Well, I'm not a tannery chemist but several observations:

"Proprietary blends" probably indicate some synthetic tannins. A lot of the "vegetable tanned" leather on the market is synthetic and yet they seem to be able to advertize and market it as "vegetable tan." It usually has a slight pinkish ivory colour.

"Fruit pods" are generally acorn caps (also referred to as valonia) and tend to make the leather flint-y and a bit brittle, in my opinion.

The old books ...specifically a book by a fellow named Waters(?)...on leather tannage and chemistry suggest that oak bark confers the best combination of durability, resistance to abrasion, and flexibility. It tends to be a deep brown in colour...at least in outsole and insole stuff. (BTW, "stuff" is a legitimate term for the raw materials that are used in shoes)

Quebracho tanned outsoling tends to have a slight pink cast and seem softer and less abrasion resistant than other tannages. I use some but advisedly.

Myself I prefer chestnut tannage for outsoling --it seems to have the temper and toughness of oak and yet finishes up better than oak tannage.It is often brown but not as brown as oak.

DW, do they offer chestnut tanned soles commercially anymore? Or is it an MTO kind of sole? Or, even, home tanned?

post #14423 of 19213
Hello everyone. I have a pair of suede rancourts that I'm looking to clean up before I sell them.

How do you guys clean suede? It's not stained or anything just needs a good cleaning. I went on youtube and seen people just use water and a suede brush after but figured I'd ask here
post #14424 of 19213
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

DW, do they offer chestnut tanned soles commercially anymore? Or is it an MTO kind of sole? Or, even, home tanned?

Well, I'm buying it regularly...as are many of my students and contemporaries.

And in fact, I'm buying from two major industry-wide sources that also deal in...specialize in...quebracho tanned outsoling sourced from their own tanneries in Argentina.

edited for punctuation and clarity
post #14425 of 19213
Quote:
Originally Posted by 7_rocket View Post

Hello everyone. I have a pair of suede rancourts that I'm looking to clean up before I sell them.

How do you guys clean suede? It's not stained or anything just needs a good cleaning. I went on youtube and seen people just use water and a suede brush after but figured I'd ask here

Saphir Omni'Nettoyant Suede Shampoo. Or dluted dove soap.
post #14426 of 19213
Don't use dove soap, the ph is too high for leather
post #14427 of 19213
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Don't use dove soap, the ph is too high for leather

Common phenomenon - whatevz they think works on their skins works on leather. Funny thought, regardless of how wrong it was, actually.

post #14428 of 19213
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

DW, do they offer chestnut tanned soles commercially anymore? Or is it an MTO kind of sole? Or, even, home tanned?

As i know, some of Italian shoemakers use chestnut tanned soles with predictable regularity. I'd imagine that in this case, they are available commercially without special request.
post #14429 of 19213
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

Common phenomenon - whatevz they think works on their skins works on leather. Funny thought, regardless of how wrong it was, actually.

 

Anthony Delos told me that he prefers Irish Springs to Dove...FWIW...

post #14430 of 19213
Quote:
Originally Posted by PCK1 View Post
 

 

Anthony Delos told me that he prefers Irish Springs to Dove...FWIW...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qb8BRlwIlDk - see the section from 5:20 to the end. This might give a certain insight as to how soaps were used in shoemaking industry, which is still much a confusing aspect.

 

@DWFII can you also take a look? If the video does not work I may figure out some other way.

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