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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 954

post #14296 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by garland View Post
 

Question for anyone that cares to comment:

 

How do you designate your brushes, and how many do you have?

 

I have the standard AE brushes that I use for brushing off polish that are divided up by color, but what do you do about renovateur, leather lotion, Bick 4, VSC, etc? I have a really great Saphir brush that I've been using to do my final brush with, but I'm wondering if I've cross contaminated it too much with cleaners and conditioners, etc.... Curious what ya'll have to say. 

Garland, I have several brushes at home. I grade them through grades of frictions, and through their friction gradings, would assign them to the specific job. Soft brushes for buffing and daily brushing, and stiffer brushes for the job of dusting and one specific brush for greases. Brushes for polish can be used on conditioners, but, as always, don't brush the shoe when product was gunked on.

post #14297 of 19038

I use one, very large, soft, Woly 'Collectors' brush for dusting off most of my shoes (which I do before and after wearing them), My red pair have their own, ditto, brush as they turn most things red.

 

I put polish and stuff on with a Selvyt cloth (I have a few) and then do some serious brushing with one of the following brushes: one for tan and brown shoes, one for burgundy and one for my red ones. I finish off with a large Selvyt cloth - which doesn't cause any lint problems.  All my brushes are made of horsehair. 

post #14298 of 19038
whoever is taking F train and getting off at 63rd and Lex. had some serious mirror shine on the double monk, I am guessing a member here
post #14299 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beach Bum View Post

I had asked that question then last night used Lexol, cream not spray, for the first time and so now have some experience.

My take is that Lexol certainly conditions the leather much more than I'm used to with Saphir. It doesnt shine the shoes whatsoever, but it's not supposed to, it's just I've become accustomed to Saphir doing just this.

Then after cream polish then wax on toe caps I feel I had less of a shine then when I last polished the two pairs six months earlier with Saphir reno then the same polishes.

This could tell me the shoes needed a bit more time after applying lexol before polishing, since maybe leather was still in a softened state. Or maybe Saphir simply does a better job at giving a better shine finish when all else is equal.

I will say I have a pair or two of shoes that are not my higher end ones and I've used much more and so take more a beating. I've only ever conditioned these with Saphir since didn't have anything else til now. And I'm not thrilled with the leather quality now, and probably could have used more of a "conditioning" conditioner like lexol all along.

Hard to make any certain conclusions from one use of lexol. It doesn't appear to darken varying shades of browns, so was happy with this. It does condition more than I've been used to. And leaves shoes in a less shiny state than I've been used to.

I'm shining a few more pairs tomorrow night during the bball games and will probably wait longer after lexol before I start the polishing.
Saphir Reno is wax heavy so it will impart a shine and building cream and wax over it will make it shine even more because you're just layering on waxes. Lexol is water based so it will disrupt the finish just as wetting the shoe would. You have to let the water evaporate leaving behind the conditioner before you can properly make the finish nice again. This is one of the reasons I think products like Reno aren't great because you're essentially just layering on waxes. The way a conditioner should work is by penetrating. If the finish isn't disrupted it's merely getting caught up in the wax.
post #14300 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


Saphir Reno is wax heavy so it will impart a shine and building cream and wax over it will make it shine even more because you're just layering on waxes. Lexol is water based so it will disrupt the finish just as wetting the shoe would. You have to let the water evaporate leaving behind the conditioner before you can properly make the finish nice again. This is one of the reasons I think products like Reno aren't great because you're essentially just layering on waxes. The way a conditioner should work is by penetrating. If the finish isn't disrupted it's merely getting caught up in the wax.

Come to think of it, Pat, it's annoying as hell, but if one wants to apply a conditioner like Lexol, I suppose they have to take time and strip the finish off to do so effectively. 

post #14301 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beach Bum View Post

Hey guys, quick question. When attempting to achieve mirror shine and applying layer(s) of wax polish with potentially drop of water in between. How do you shine/ bull during this process?

More specifically, do you always wax in a circular motion with say your one or two fingers? Or do you find yourself going in a faster (more rigorous) back and forth motion?

I ask cause I can bull/ buff the cap toe faster going back and forth barely skimming the edge. But then I've always heard wax needs to be buffed in a circular motion like one does on a car.

Needless to say I've never gone over 3/4 wax layers each followed by a speck of water, and consequently do not achieve a super mirror shine like some on here do.

 

Waxing your car in circles is giving it swirl marks. Read up at carcareonline.com, that guy is a car cleaning maniac, but his description of waxing is right on. 

 

Short story...wax your car in straight lines in the direction the wind goes over it.

post #14302 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rubik1014 View Post
 

 

Waxing your car in circles is giving it swirl marks. Read up at carcareonline.com, that guy is a car cleaning maniac, but his description of waxing is right on. 

 

Short story...wax your car in straight lines in the direction the wind goes over it.

Take that swirl marks out with a chamois cloth.

post #14303 of 19038

Thanks pB.  You helped confirm my take on lexol vs renovateur.

post #14304 of 19038

I'm going to buy a dedicated conditioner.

 

Lexol or Bick4?

 

Please help me decide!

 

(for calf leather shoes, black, brown, C&J, Church's, Barkers, etc)

post #14305 of 19038

Pretty much the same.

post #14306 of 19038

Lexol bought!

 

Don't let me down Zapa!

post #14307 of 19038

Good choice, man!

post #14308 of 19038

Can I get your advice on this please?

 

I recently wore my favourite C&J out on a wet winters day.  As I walked across the works car park, I noticed that I got some small droplets of water on the surface of my shoes and the leather went dark where the droplets were sat.  I didn't think much of it.

 

When I got home, I noticed a mottle effect discolouration, especially on the vamp area.  I had lots of wax on the toecap and that didnt absorb any water.  I thought that perhaps the wax had partly come away at the vamp.

 

The next day when the shoes were dry, I used renomat to take off all the old polish.  The mottle effect stayed exactly the same.

 

I then applied renovateur, Saphir cream and Saphir wax.  The discolouration is still visible. 

 

What can  do?  Could this be salt staining?  Should I try renomat again and them some Hiver salt remover?  I didnt have Hiver at the time but I have some now.

 

Any suggestions?

 

 

 

(Also, do you think this leather needs conditioning?  I'm looking to try my lexol when it arrives)

post #14309 of 19038

The world is full of awful dramas and people worry about a few drops of rain on their shoes. Wake up!

post #14310 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rubik1014 View Post
 

 

Waxing your car in circles is giving it swirl marks. Read up at carcareonline.com, that guy is a car cleaning maniac, but his description of waxing is right on. 

 

Short story...wax your car in straight lines in the direction the wind goes over it.

This is actually a misnomer. Swirl marks are "swirly" looking because of the way a light source reflects off them. They are primarily a huge matrix of fine linear scratches in all directions and you will most certianly still see swirls even if you wax your car in one direction. If you're scratching the paint in circles, you're just going to scratch it in straight lines with this technique..

 

The real trick is to not scratch it with incorrect technique and materials. Number one error is using dirty cloths (or using only one and not properly cleaning it between bucket dips) to wash and dry the paint. 

 

As for how this applies to shoes, when you're bulling or mirror shining, you always want to be using clean materials. Keep your application and buffing pads or cloths freshly washed and have mutliples so if you drop one on the floor or carpet, you can set it aside. When you drop sticky, waxy rags on the ground, they will easily pick up small micro scale grit and you'll grind it right into your shoe when re-using it from the floor. Same with buffing cloths. When it doubt, use a fresh, clean one.

 

Now that you bring up car care, Rubik, I almost wonder how some of the techniques would carry over. Carnauba wax is used in both cases... if I had a pair of shoes that were candidates for a shine, I might consider cross-applying some car shining skills.

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