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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 950

post #14236 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by mry8s View Post

Just paste this into any browser. You don't need to be logged in to Youtube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hqVi6BOaL5U

Thanks but is that the same video? Nothing mentioned about Crockett & Jones.

FWIW, I didn't see anything controversial in this video although he is polishing new, unworn shoes and makers no mention of polishing the outsole when the shoes are worn--something that is both futile and often problematic in my opinion.
post #14237 of 19259

DW, Are you sure you are looking at the clip that mry posted?  The opening reads Crocket and Jones, then shows a long shot and close up of the C&J workshop and the man describes himself as the Paris manager for C&J...

 

The shoes he polishes seem to have been worn...they have scratched soles that must be at least a few months old.

 

I wonder if something happened in between the 'new' posting of the site and your opening it?  The link, above, certainly does take you to the C&J's site.

 

I wonder what your thoughts are about his putting trees into shoes with the laces tied and his using a huge amount of product. Surely these aren't good things to do?

post #14238 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

DW, Are you sure you are looking at the clip that mry posted?  The opening reads Crocket and Jones, then shows a long shot and close up of the C&J workshop and the man describes himself as the Paris manager for C&J...

The shoes he polishes seem to have been worn...they have scratched soles that must be at least a few months old.

I wonder if something happened in between the 'new' posting of the site and your opening it?  The link, above, certainly does take you to the C&J's site.

I wonder what your thoughts are about his putting trees into shoes with the laces tied and his using a huge amount of product. Surely these aren't good things to do?

I don't know what happened. I clicked on the link in my email notification. I ended up at the Hong Kong Tatler video.

I stand by everything I said in my original response to you.

As far as putting the trees in while the shoes are laced...I dunno. Unless they are lasted trees, I don't think it makes any difference.
post #14239 of 19259

I'm keen to learn more about Lexol and Bick4 which regularly gets mentioned on here.

 

Are these the exact equivalents of Saphir Renovateur?

 

I often use Renovateur on my calf leather shoes - are Lexol or Bick4 better in any way?  Is it worth getting either of these if I already have Reno?

 

Thanks

post #14240 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

...Well, mimo, I don't know about you, but I'm not into the Kiwi cult, and if anything, I clearly stated that in the comment. And polishes being more expensive than shoes may sound ridiculous, but many people thrifted shoes cost THAT cheap and were still using Saphir or Glen Karen on them.

I think what mimo was trying to say is that it doesn’t make sense to use high quality polish on low quality shoes.

Clarks (the manufacture of the shoes in question) is one of the largest manufacturers of shoes in the world. The SRP of their men’s dress shoes range from $90 to $180 USD. Shoes in this range use lower quality (mostly corrected grain) leather and inherently have a thicker finish than non-corrected grain leather. These shoes are also mass produced in large factories where the quality control cannot meet the standards of a higher end manufacturer.

Since this quality of shoe is not expected to last more than 5 years, it is a good candidate for a polish that is low in oils, contains gums, and a cheap solvent. At this level, shoe polish is not as relevant to the life of the shoe, and serves mostly as just a shining agent. Kiwi polish serves this purpose well.

Shoes of higher quality materials and construction benefit from higher quality shoe polish, like Saphir and GlenKaren, because the ingredients can assist in the longevity of the leather of a shoe designed to last more than 5 years.

I would also not recommend trying to strip the finish off of a lower end corrected grain shoe as the results could destroy the finish and the shoe.
Please note that I have nothing against Clarks, they have always been nice to me when I’ve talked to them, and they certainly know their market.
post #14241 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by glenjay View Post


I think what mimo was trying to say is that it doesn’t make sense to use high quality polish on low quality shoes.

Clarks (the manufacture of the shoes in question) is one of the largest manufacturers of shoes in the world. The SRP of their men’s dress shoes range from $90 to $180 USD. Shoes in this range use lower quality (mostly corrected grain) leather and inherently have a thicker finish than non-corrected grain leather. These shoes are also mass produced in large factories where the quality control cannot meet the standards of a higher end manufacturer.

Since this quality of shoe is not expected to last more than 5 years, it is a good candidate for a polish that is low in oils, contains gums, and a cheap solvent. At this level, shoe polish is not as relevant to the life of the shoe, and serves mostly as just a shining agent. Kiwi polish serves this purpose well.

Shoes of higher quality materials and construction benefit from higher quality shoe polish, like Saphir and GlenKaren, because the ingredients can assist in the longevity of the leather of a shoe designed to last more than 5 years.

I would also not recommend trying to strip the finish off of a lower end corrected grain shoe as the results could destroy the finish and the shoe.
Please note that I have nothing against Clarks, they have always been nice to me when I’ve talked to them, and they certainly know their market.

I hear ya, Glen. But somehow I'm just not into the Kiwi cult (and I do have a tendency of being against, FWIW).

post #14242 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Thanks but is that the same video? Nothing mentioned about Crockett & Jones.

FWIW, I didn't see anything controversial in this video although he is polishing new, unworn shoes and makers no mention of polishing the outsole when the shoes are worn--something that is both futile and often problematic in my opinion.

You can search this headline on YouTube "Crockett and Jones 'How to polish your shoes'" and look for a video where the manager of Crockett & Jones in Paris was shining the shoes, DW.

post #14243 of 19259

DW  

"Don't believe everything you read on the Internet...real, objective knowledge and experience matters. Associations matter. Credentials matter. There's more misinformation on the 'Net than insight...esp. coming from sources that make their living selling or seeking an easy profit".

 

 

I think I probably know these things. I'm not sure I need to be patronised though!  :happy:

post #14244 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by glenjay View Post

I think what mimo was trying to say is that it doesn’t make sense to use high quality polish on low quality shoes.

 

Yes.  When I was a little boy, Clark's was considered a good pair of shoes, in a very mainstream, accessible way.  They were put together properly, and compared to the average income, cost rather more than they do today.  Now they sell for $40 upwards, and are glued together from questionable materials.  Which is a pity, but such is life: we'd rather pay $40 for rubbish than $400 for quality.  Sometimes we pay $400 for rubbish, too, but that's a different issue.

 

Anyway, put another way: you can't polish a turd.  Even with Saphir Medaille d'Or.

post #14245 of 19259

Now that makes a lot more sense.

post #14246 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

DW
I think I probably know these things. I'm not sure I need to be patronised though! happy.gif

Sorry you feel that way...sincerely. I guess you had to be there:
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


It's probably worth repeating...for all those just coming to the question and the conversation....

--

edited for punctuation and clarity
Edited by DWFII - 3/23/15 at 1:57pm
post #14247 of 19259

I have been directed here for help on this project:

I recently bought a pair of second hand thom browne brogues, and the previous owner for some reason cut off the heel tabs on them. I am quite a sucker for heel tabs as I currently own a few pairs of mark mcnairy boots which have them, so I was wondering if anyone here could assist me with a way to add new heel tabs? I already have the thom browne ribbon I just need to figure out away to remove the old cut ones and replace them, I was thinking of carefully cutting them out and pulling back the shoe liner, inserting the new ones and then maybe using some kind of glue to secure them. Has anyone here had experience in this matter? Help will be much appreciated!


Here are the shoes:

 

here is the heel tab:

post #14248 of 19259
Personally, I think any competent cobbler should be able to do that for you, for a fairly reasonable price.
post #14249 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnglishShoes View Post

I'm keen to learn more about Lexol and Bick4 which regularly gets mentioned on here.

Are these the exact equivalents of Saphir Renovateur?

I often use Renovateur on my calf leather shoes - are Lexol or Bick4 better in any way?  Is it worth getting either of these if I already have Reno?

Thanks

Second this, Im curious as well since while I have and use Saphir Reno I just bought lexol from a local hardware store in light of positive things here. But curious what advantage each has over the other.
post #14250 of 19259
Quote:
Originally Posted by lavanlint View Post
 

I have been directed here for help on this project:

I recently bought a pair of second hand thom browne brogues, and the previous owner for some reason cut off the heel tabs on them. I am quite a sucker for heel tabs as I currently own a few pairs of mark mcnairy boots which have them, so I was wondering if anyone here could assist me with a way to add new heel tabs? I already have the thom browne ribbon I just need to figure out away to remove the old cut ones and replace them, I was thinking of carefully cutting them out and pulling back the shoe liner, inserting the new ones and then maybe using some kind of glue to secure them. Has anyone here had experience in this matter? Help will be much appreciated!


Here are the shoes:

 

here is the heel tab:

Either go to a competent cobbler, or else leave it as is, for I don't see if there are any real use of the tab anyway, especially for a pair of shoes.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beach Bum View Post


Second this, Im curious as well since while I have and use Saphir Reno I just bought lexol from a local hardware store in light of positive things here. But curious what advantage each has over the other.

Reno doesn't condition the leather anywhere as good as Lexol and Bick4 does. Reno can only give a shine, but even so, it remains slightly tacky if over-use. 

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