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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 946

post #14176 of 19081
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stemo79 View Post


Although I'm just speculating I would assume the blue box is their standard cleaner as oppose to the medaille d'or which is their premium range. Saphir are pretty tight lipped about what goes into their products so I don't know the exact difference I'm afraid. Essentially it will be a differing ingredient set up like the renovateur vs renovator scenario (renovateur has the more expensive mink oil in, renovator doesn't).

I have the black boxed medaille d'or suede cleaner and it's fantastic!

Thanks for your response. Do you think the $9 price difference would be worth it?

 

Does anyone else have information about this?

post #14177 of 19081
Quote:
Originally Posted by benhour View Post

either way i dont think there will be any harm from what i reccomended and what i would do!! (if you look closely at the first photo at the outer part of the vamp  you can see that the finish is not existing any more  and there is a nap developing (sorry for my english i  try to be as specific as i can) !! happy.gif

there wont be any problem on raising a shine  if you wont cake them in dubbin!!(always less is more with dubbin) 
calf leather treated more than 7 times with dubbin : 

   

I stand corrected!!
post #14178 of 19081
Quote:
Originally Posted by justridiculous View Post

Thanks for your response. Do you think the $9 price difference would be worth it?

Does anyone else have information about this?

I trust saphir products and have noticed a difference between the creme surfine (standard range) and medaille d'or pommadier creams, also there's a noticeable result difference between the renovator and renovateur so I have no reason to doubt them over which suede cleaner would be better.

Like I said, I have the product myself and have used it. You only need a few drops in water so a little goes a long way, so I think 9 dollars is a drop in the ocean considering.

What I would say about suede is hold off cleaning them as long as possible, use suede protector and a brass brush for regular maintenance. I'd only shampoo them as a last resort.
post #14179 of 19081
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stemo79 View Post


I trust saphir products and have noticed a difference between the creme surfine (standard range) and medaille d'or pommadier creams, also there's a noticeable result difference between the renovator and renovateur so I have no reason to doubt them over which suede cleaner would be better.

Like I said, I have the product myself and have used it. You only need a few drops in water so a little goes a long way, so I think 9 dollars is a drop in the ocean considering.

What I would say about suede is hold off cleaning them as long as possible, use suede protector and a brass brush for regular maintenance. I'd only shampoo them as a last resort.

Thank you for your help.

post #14180 of 19081
Quote:
Originally Posted by benhour View Post
 

either way i dont think there will be any harm from what i reccomended and what i would do!! (if you look closely at the first photo at the outer part of the vamp  you can see that the finish is not existing any more  and there is a nap developing (sorry for my english i  try to be as specific as i can) !! :happy:

 

there wont be any problem on raising a shine  if you wont cake them in dubbin!!(always less is more with dubbin) 

calf leather treated more than 7 times with dubbin : 

   

Do you dub the whole shoe or just certain areas, Ben? I rub grease on my whole shoes, and spend at least 5 minutes (10 minutes on a generous day) rubbing the grease really deep into the leather.

post #14181 of 19081
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

Do you dub the whole shoe or just certain areas, Ben? I rub grease on my whole shoes, and spend at least 5 minutes (10 minutes on a generous day) rubbing the grease really deep into the leather.

Mostly Travers i use dubbin at the vamp area (sparingly at the entire shoe , and really really rare at the areas like heel and toe) ! if the shoes doesnt have build ups of polish you wont need to rub just apply it with your fingers at it ll get absorbed quit easily

post #14182 of 19081
Quote:
Originally Posted by benhour View Post
 

Mostly Travers i use dubbin at the vamp area (sparingly at the entire shoe , and really really rare at the areas like heel and toe) ! if the shoes doesnt have build ups of polish you wont need to rub just apply it with your fingers at it ll get absorbed quit easily

Somehow I always rub them well in just to be safe, Ben. They're always effective. From what I read in antique books, way back then when leather was a lot better and were all veg tanned, people used to rub greases/dubbins on before polishing.

 

If my shoes were veg tanned I wouldn't have to worry too much. However, all the calfskins here are chromed, so, until I get bespoke shoes, or else fuck it LOL!!

post #14183 of 19081

Shoe care products often work better if you apply them with a strong French accent.  Italian is OK, but French is best.  Sneer a bit, too.  Works like magic.

post #14184 of 19081

LOL!!

post #14185 of 19081
Quote:
Originally Posted by mimo View Post
 

Shoe care products often work better if you apply them with a strong French accent.  Italian is OK, but French is best.  Sneer a bit, too.  Works like magic.



I wondered why I wasn't getting good results with my saphir products. 

post #14186 of 19081

I have a pair of Alden color 8 shell tanker boots, but I am not so enthusiastic about the dark edging/welt area nor the standard eyelets. Recently, a SF member who lives back east, had his edging antiqued by a cobbler who also installed these really nice brass eyelets. I think the combo is striking and is a nice contrast to the color 8 shell. I'd like to have something like this done on my tankers, but I want them to be in good hands and not have my shell boots get screwed up. Can anyone suggest a west coast cobbler that they think could do a good job with this? Likewise, if not west coast, then anywhere else would be next best. Thanks.

 

post #14187 of 19081
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carson View Post
 

I have a pair of Alden color 8 shell tanker boots, but I am not so enthusiastic about the dark edging/welt area nor the standard eyelets. Recently, a SF member who lives back east, had his edging antiqued by a cobbler who also installed these really nice brass eyelets. I think the combo is striking and is a nice contrast to the color 8 shell. I'd like to have something like this done on my tankers, but I want them to be in good hands and not have my shell boots get screwed up. Can anyone suggest a west coast cobbler that they think could do a good job with this? Likewise, if not west coast, then anywhere else would be next best. Thanks.

 

I would suggest you contact B. Nelson in NYC. Or else, if you are one helluva adventurous dude, you may try getting Abbeyhorn "Snake Head" Sleeking bone, or any burnishing tool from Tandy Leather Factory, some conditioner, neutral cream and wax, and do it yourself. The way how edges can look "antique" is via the use of neutral polishes and burnishing - don't forget to brush, also. As time goes by, you'll get the effect you desire. Neutral polishes will saturate the color, and the addition of a conditioner aids in saturating from the finish to the fibers. 

post #14188 of 19081
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

I would suggest you contact B. Nelson in NYC. Or else, if you are one helluva adventurous dude, you may try getting Abbeyhorn "Snake Head" Sleeking bone, or any burnishing tool from Tandy Leather Factory, some conditioner, neutral cream and wax, and do it yourself. The way how edges can look "antique" is via the use of neutral polishes and burnishing - don't forget to brush, also. As time goes by, you'll get the effect you desire. Neutral polishes will saturate the color, and the addition of a conditioner aids in saturating from the finish to the fibers. 

 

Yeah, I know of B. Nelson. Thanks for the reminder. As for the edging - what I am looking for is something like in the previous photo. They used to be like mine, which I am posting a photo of below, so someone - the cobbler - had to at least strip off the original dark edging that mine below have, and made it look like the photo above...

 

post #14189 of 19081
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carson View Post
 

 

Yeah, I know of B. Nelson. Thanks for the reminder. As for the edging - what I am looking for is something like in the previous photo. They used to be like mine, which I am posting a photo of below, so someone - the cobbler - had to at least strip off the original dark edging that mine below have, and made it look like the photo above...

 

Sorry. Forgot to mention stripping the previous finish. You can DIY that step with alcohol, turp spirit (the one from paint shop), or if the finish is water based, simply scrub with a brush and some water.

post #14190 of 19081
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carson View Post
 

I have a pair of Alden color 8 shell tanker boots, but I am not so enthusiastic about the dark edging/welt area nor the standard eyelets. Recently, a SF member who lives back east, had his edging antiqued by a cobbler who also installed these really nice brass eyelets. I think the combo is striking and is a nice contrast to the color 8 shell. I'd like to have something like this done on my tankers, but I want them to be in good hands and not have my shell boots get screwed up. Can anyone suggest a west coast cobbler that they think could do a good job with this? Likewise, if not west coast, then anywhere else would be next best. Thanks.

Brian the Bootmaker is located in Los Angeles and should be able to do anything you ask. He is quite expensive, but he knows his stuff.

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