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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 936

post #14026 of 19072
I believe it is surface dyed because the edges are just painted with some sort of black resin and when it wears the edges are a natural color. It is a JP Marcellino, fwiw.
post #14027 of 19072
It certainly has a topcoat of some sort because it has worn in areas my hand touches often and those spots absorb a lot of conditioner.
post #14028 of 19072

If the hide was finished the "real McCoy" traditional way, then the top coat should be a mixture very close or slightly different to the mixture I posted up there. 

post #14029 of 19072

Pat, come to think of your brief case, have they ever suggested you using this product for treatment - https://www.duvallleatherwork.com/shop/je-sedgwick-co-leathercare-product-500-ml-size/ -? 

post #14030 of 19072
I only really use lexol on it. I don't want anything like that on it because it could rub off onto my suits. Lexol penetrates and stays there.
post #14031 of 19072

Eh you got point... Need it penetrative...

 

I understand why people had butlers back in the very, very old days. Those guys could sit there and burnish those products into the leather.

post #14032 of 19072
A natural, unfinished vegetable tanned leather...such as outsoling...can be burnished by moistening the leather with water. Let it sit a moment and wipe off the excess . Let it sit another minute or a couple. Then take a polished bone or a polished piece of very fine grained hardwood such as boxwood ot some kinds of tropical rosewoods.

And then with long strokes, but not excessive pressure, rub the moist area. and continue rubbing it. And continue rubbing it. Eventually the leather will start to shine.

This is probably a little impractical on a briefcase but it works a treat on outsole where the burnishing tool is nearly as wide as the outsole and a relatively short stroke will go from one end to the other.

Putting wax on it before burnishing doesn't work or help. Wax after, not before.

--
edited for punctuation and clarity
Edited by DWFII - 3/12/15 at 6:08pm
post #14033 of 19072

Interesting, DW. I did that to heel and sole edges, and whilst the first round was simply with water and pressure, the second round, when I rub some wax dressing on, and then proceed to burnishing, it shines a lot better, and feel a lot smoother as well.

post #14034 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

Interesting, DW. I did that to heel and sole edges, and whilst the first round was simply with water and pressure, the second round, when I rub some wax dressing on, and then proceed to burnishing, it shines a lot better, and feel a lot smoother as well.

I suspect it is the wax that is shining not the leather. Never has worked for me at any rate to use the wax as part of the burnishing procedure. Burnishing smooths and compresses the the grain surface--that's the intent, the shine is secondary. I do this on the bottoms of outsoles and on the heels stacks before and after dying but once the wax is applied, the leather itself is "occluded," in a sense. the leather can no longer be wet and the bone cannot act upon the wet leather. The wax may be said to be burnished but the leather is not.
post #14035 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


I suspect it is the wax that is shining not the leather. Never has worked for me at any rate to use the wax as part of the burnishing procedure. Burnishing smooths and compresses the the grain surface--that's the intent, the shine is secondary. I do this on the bottoms of outsoles and on the heels stacks before and after dying but once the wax is applied, the leather itself is "occluded," in a sense. the leather can no longer be wet and the bone cannot act upon the wet leather. The wax may be said to be burnished but the leather is not.

I hear ya on this one. Still, it looks nice, though.

 

I tried the burnishing on my AE Shell Dundee when I cleaned it back in January. Gotta say, the result was well worth the extra work. It really shines up.

post #14036 of 19072

@patrick_b if your roughout low boots (the one that took HDLP treatment) got some dirt on, how do you clean them? 

 

Just a thought that occurred on my mind.

post #14037 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Layered Player View Post

Gentlemen, first I apologize if I'm breaching protocol by asking before reading the ENTIRE thread...ain't nobody(with small children) got time for that!


I've inherited a pair of Aristocraft ruby shell cordovan captoes and they're cracking a bit in the vamp.


What can I do to 1. stop it, if possible and 2. limit future damage?


Much obliged in advance!

You really have to identify whether if it is just the polish cracking, or is it the hide itself is falling apart.

It seems to be surface cracking...I'll try to get some pics later.

 

Is there any harm in using polish on them?

post #14038 of 19072

Stop using just polish. Shell can be treated just like calf, although certain specific calfskin only creams were not to be used. Use Lexol dressing, a cleaner/conditioner, a cream polish, and keep the leather well condition. You may stretch the course of maintenance schedule, but you may not forget that shell had lost all of its oil content via usage, and paste wax only worsen the matter.

 

And please, try not get yourself being too awfully deceived by the paste wax folklore. 

post #14039 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post
 

Stop using just polish. Shell can be treated just like calf, although certain specific calfskin only creams were not to be used. Use Lexol dressing, a cleaner/conditioner, a cream polish, and keep the leather well condition. You may stretch the course of maintenance schedule, but you may not forget that shell had lost all of its oil content via usage, and paste wax only worsen the matter.

 

And please, try not get yourself being too awfully deceived by the paste wax folklore.

 

Duly noted...I have Renovateur and Saphir crème polish, will that do?

post #14040 of 19072

What kind of Saphir Crème polish, though? Because the 1925 cream for calf leather will not work with shell cordovan. The cordovan cream is what you primarily need. Otherwise, get GlenKaren cream polish because it has avery high oil content.

 

Renovateur will not condition as expected. It gives too much a shine rather than really condition the leather. You will need something like Lexol conditioner, where the oil content can be properly restore through high penetration into the fiber mat.  

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