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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 935

post #14011 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beach Bum View Post

Hey, anyone know which stores carry Lexol? Home Depot, Target, etc?

Thanks.

http://www.amazon.com/Lexol-1013-Leather-Conditioner-Liter/dp/B000637TNM
post #14012 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beach Bum View Post

Hey, anyone know which stores carry Lexol? Home Depot, Target, etc?

Thanks.

Even Walmart, if you wish, or any shoe repair shops.

post #14013 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by benhour View Post
 

Travers i cant be100% sure for all my shoes! But most of them are vegetable tanned (that is stated from the manufacturer and  from what i see they look like to be veg tanned)!! one pair of monks i own even the seller was saying they were bark tanned i suspect they where chrome tanned from an undyed part of the tongue (it was blueish inside)!!  i can only be sure  for the pair that is made from a friend of mine cause i have seen pictures from the hide!! 

Now that's a pain when they said bark tanned but turned out to be the wet blue stuff LOL!

 

On the contrary, beware if that might just be the effect of the dye.

 

The distinguish characteristic of veg tanned leather is that they can be burnished with a smooth object to a fair shine, as DW said, although, FWIW, he also mentioned of an Annonay chrome tanned capable of being burnished.

post #14014 of 19050
Finished veg tanned leather generally doesn't burnish, it more or less just scratches, or gets depressions in it, ime. I tried burnishing my bridle leather briefcase with the back of a spoon and it just left impressions. Maybe you just have to keep going and even it out? Seems like it would take 30 years.
post #14015 of 19050

Thanks

post #14016 of 19050

Gentlemen, first I apologize if I'm breaching protocol by asking before reading the ENTIRE thread...ain't nobody(with small children) got time for that!

 

 

I've inherited a pair of Aristocraft ruby shell cordovan captoes and they're cracking a bit in the vamp.

 

 

What can I do to 1. stop it, if possible and 2. limit future damage?

 

 

Much obliged in advance!

post #14017 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by Layered Player View Post

Gentlemen, first I apologize if I'm breaching protocol by asking before reading the ENTIRE thread...ain't nobody(with small children) got time for that!


I've inherited a pair of Aristocraft ruby cordovan captoes and they're cracking a bit in the vamp.


What can I do to 1. stop it, if possible and 2. limit future damage?


Much obliged in advance!

No worries, it's not possible to breach a protocol in this thread. This is a showcase of humanity on its best. rolleyes.gif

There are some knowledgeable people here that can answer your question but they would need to see the pictures of shoes, especially the "cracking".

It could be something simple that can be buffed out or it could be something beyond repair so pictures would be of great help.
post #14018 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Finished veg tanned leather generally doesn't burnish, it more or less just scratches, or gets depressions in it, ime. I tried burnishing my bridle leather briefcase with the back of a spoon and it just left impressions. Maybe you just have to keep going and even it out? Seems like it would take 30 years.

A spoon isn't very productive with veg tanned leather, FWIW, Pat, because metal's chemical properties imparts weird reactions to veg tanned leathers. I've had much more successes with Abbeyhorn slicker bone (what they'd call "snake head"), the deer bone, and a hammer's shaft. If at all possible, dip your finger into water, rub on the spots, and burnish, and at the end, the finish will be intriguing.
post #14019 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by Layered Player View Post

Gentlemen, first I apologize if I'm breaching protocol by asking before reading the ENTIRE thread...ain't nobody(with small children) got time for that!


I've inherited a pair of Aristocraft ruby shell cordovan captoes and they're cracking a bit in the vamp.


What can I do to 1. stop it, if possible and 2. limit future damage?


Much obliged in advance!

You really have to identify whether if it is just the polish cracking, or is it the hide itself is falling apart.
post #14020 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by Layered Player View Post

Gentlemen, first I apologize if I'm breaching protocol by asking before reading the ENTIRE thread...ain't nobody(with small children) got time for that!


I've inherited a pair of Aristocraft ruby shell cordovan captoes and they're cracking a bit in the vamp.


What can I do to 1. stop it, if possible and 2. limit future damage?


Much obliged in advance!

If it is truly cracking places like B Nelson shoes can patch it from the inside, but I would imagine that is very costly. Aside from that there's nothing you can do.
Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

A spoon isn't very productive with veg tanned leather, FWIW, Pat, because metal's chemical properties imparts weird reactions to veg tanned leathers. I've had much more successes with Abbeyhorn slicker bone (what they'd call "snake head"), the deer bone, and a hammer's shaft. If at all possible, dip your finger into water, rub on the spots, and burnish, and at the end, the finish will be intriguing.

I've tried doing it with an abbey horn buffalo shoe horn with no better results. I was always under the impression it was more about the compression of the fibers and less to do with the material used (as long as it is smooth and hard).
post #14021 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I've tried doing it with an abbey horn buffalo shoe horn with no better results. I was always under the impression it was more about the compression of the fibers and less to do with the material used (as long as it is smooth and hard).

I don't know, Pat, but spoons had never really worked for me. Most spoons are also high on chrome (ever seen any modern spoons rusting? That oughtta be illegitimate case LOL), and I think they don't help. But, yah, as of burnishing, it's basically glazing with an object via manual labor and a smooth object (in the case of veg tanned, it just oughtta be natural material). 

 

Have you tried burnishing waxes on the leather? I think it oughtta be slightly different. When I burnish the sole edges of my shoes, I rubbed water along the edges, then rub the bone on, then as soon as that was smooth and shiny, I added some wax dressing (the kind of thing such as beeswax mixed with an oil, not polish), and that made a big difference. I think bridle leather benefits a lot from burnishing with a wax product, so, if possible, try and see how that works out :)

post #14022 of 19050
I've only tried with wax polish. Just smudges around. It is funny though the back of the brief that continuously rubs on my side when walking is super shiny from the subtle but constant friction.
post #14023 of 19050

Burnishing rulez LOL!!!!

 

Wax polish? As in regular paste wax? I don't really know, but on a constant norm, I'd conclude that as a bad decision LOL!

 

They used to have a specific mix for blackening bridle leather, something like 3 part beef tallow, 4 part pure neatsfoot oil, 1 part blacking (ivory black, carbon soot blacks), and one part beeswax. I'd love to try that out when I am done creating waxed calf. 

post #14024 of 19050
I didn't really put much effort into it to be honest. I mean none of my leather really needs to be burnished as it is all black. I was just seeing if I could raise a shine with just friction. After about 30 seconds I lost interest. Other than some sort of solvent added I don't see why paste wax polish would be any different.
post #14025 of 19050

My crazy explanation is that ordinary wax polish lack of a lubrication ingredients, which, while putting a shine on, doesn't do real justice for the natural beauty of bridle leather.

 

Your brief case, were they surface dyed or struck through? I love the surface dyed leathers. They age beautifully, even when they were dyed black.

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