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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 919

post #13771 of 19043

For any HDLP users out there...

 

Just for kicks, I took a pair of natural CXL roughout boots that I don't wear that much, and slathered HDLP all over them in an attempt to convert them to a "waxed flesh" type boot.  It's been about three hours since then, and the boots are still tacky and "oily".

 

This is my first exposure to HDLP (don't really need it in El Paso) so not sure what to expect.  Will it dry?  If so, is it hours or days?  Or am I going to get HDLP all over my denim when I wear them even a week from now?

post #13772 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by BootSpell View Post

For any HDLP users out there...

Just for kicks, I took a pair of natural CXL roughout boots that I don't wear that much, and slathered HDLP all over them in an attempt to convert them to a "waxed flesh" type boot.  It's been about three hours since then, and the boots are still tacky and "oily".

This is my first exposure to HDLP (don't really need it in El Paso) so not sure what to expect.  Will it dry?  If so, is it hours or days?  Or am I going to get HDLP all over my denim when I wear them even a week from now?

I use HDLP but I don't slather it on..did you heat the boots a little or the hdlp? I think it will eventually dry...I would have just spent the time and rubbed a thin layer on it with your fingers and just do a thin coat daily until you got the desired look.

I love how it retains the waxy look on my waxed long branches.
post #13773 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by BootSpell View Post

For any HDLP users out there...

Just for kicks, I took a pair of natural CXL roughout boots that I don't wear that much, and slathered HDLP all over them in an attempt to convert them to a "waxed flesh" type boot.  It's been about three hours since then, and the boots are still tacky and "oily".

For what it's worth...and if it's what you had in mind...the Traditional "waxed calf" / waxed flesh had a completely non-sticky, almost hard finish on it. Even though the flesh was waxed, it could be given an almost patent leather shine. It required using wheat paste and a lot of elbow grease, but it could be, and often was, done on a daily basis.

I doubt that even using heat you will ever get a surface that is entirely non-sticky and which doesn't pick up and collect dust and dirt.
post #13774 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kahuna75 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by BootSpell View Post

For any HDLP users out there...

Just for kicks, I took a pair of natural CXL roughout boots that I don't wear that much, and slathered HDLP all over them in an attempt to convert them to a "waxed flesh" type boot.  It's been about three hours since then, and the boots are still tacky and "oily".

This is my first exposure to HDLP (don't really need it in El Paso) so not sure what to expect.  Will it dry?  If so, is it hours or days?  Or am I going to get HDLP all over my denim when I wear them even a week from now?

I use HDLP but I don't slather it on..did you heat the boots a little or the hdlp? I think it will eventually dry...I would have just spent the time and rubbed a thin layer on it with your fingers and just do a thin coat daily until you got the desired look.

I love how it retains the waxy look on my waxed long branches.

Check this link out maybe some tips



http://90thidpg.us/Equipment/Projects/Dubbing/
post #13775 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kahuna75 View Post


I use HDLP but I don't slather it on..did you heat the boots a little or the hdlp? I think it will eventually dry...I would have just spent the time and rubbed a thin layer on it with your fingers and just do a thin coat daily until you got the desired look.

I love how it retains the waxy look on my waxed long branches.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


For what it's worth...and if it's what you had in mind...the Traditional "waxed calf" / waxed flesh had a completely non-sticky, almost hard finish on it. Even though the flesh was waxed, it could be given an almost patent leather shine. It required using wheat paste and a lot of elbow grease, but it could be, and often was, done on a daily basis.

I doubt that even using heat you will ever get a surface that is entirely non-sticky and which doesn't pick up and collect dust and dirt.

 

Thanks for the feedback.  I have a pair of Viberg's waxed flesh boots and as you say, @DWFII, it has a completely non-sticky, hard finish on it, at least where I've not worn that finish off, where it's become nappy.  I quite like that look.

 

Well, glad I did it on some boots that weren't one of my favorites.  I hope that it will dry up some in a few days.

post #13776 of 19043
Hello guys. I'm new here so I'm not sure if I'm posting this in the correct thread but anyway here goes.

I have a pair of suede sneakers in dark blue, and the left shoe's suede was fading so I bought Woly's suede protector in ocean colour to restore it. I think it works well however my shoes have brown leather linings around the uppers, and in my clumsiness I managed to contaminate it with a bit of the dark blue dye.

How do I go about removing the dye from the leather? I read that using nail polish remover works but is that the best way?
post #13777 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by BootSpell View Post
 

For any HDLP users out there...

 

Just for kicks, I took a pair of natural CXL roughout boots that I don't wear that much, and slathered HDLP all over them in an attempt to convert them to a "waxed flesh" type boot.  It's been about three hours since then, and the boots are still tacky and "oily".

 

This is my first exposure to HDLP (don't really need it in El Paso) so not sure what to expect.  Will it dry?  If so, is it hours or days?  Or am I going to get HDLP all over my denim when I wear them even a week from now?

Three hours are not good enough. If you want waxed flesh, you need to leave that on them for days plus, not just three hours. A normal light application would have required a day to absorb, let alone slathering it.

post #13778 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


For what it's worth...and if it's what you had in mind...the Traditional "waxed calf" / waxed flesh had a completely non-sticky, almost hard finish on it. Even though the flesh was waxed, it could be given an almost patent leather shine. It required using wheat paste and a lot of elbow grease, but it could be, and often was, done on a daily basis.

I doubt that even using heat you will ever get a surface that is entirely non-sticky and which doesn't pick up and collect dust and dirt.

DW, it took warm attics and years, right? 

As of the condition of the attic, does the area get maintain on a consistent basis?

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kahuna75 View Post


Check this link out maybe some tips



http://90thidpg.us/Equipment/Projects/Dubbing/

Used to try that. Only worked somewhat. If it's veg tanned, I'd recommend actually burnish the surface with little bit of water to smoothen and harden the surface, then hand rub high quality grease on and let dry, rather than just plainly dub and heat it like that.

post #13779 of 19043
What is wheat paste? Is it like a flour mixed with some sort of oil?
post #13780 of 19043

I think it's water, Pat, because water is the only thing that can evaporate fast enough to harden the compound for burnishing.

post #13781 of 19043
Very strange. Sounds like it would be very drying.
post #13782 of 19043

Well, yeah, you need the surface to be sufficiently dry so that a polish can take place. All the oils and greases were stored tightly deep in the leather, so, a few brush strokes, some shoe cream would be sufficient. Crazy asshole like myself would lightly grease it before polishing LOL!

 

Part of the reason why I would have love a pair of waxed calf footwear. Fully stuffed to the bottom of the belly but remains polishable, and could pretty much overthrow Shell Cordovan Dynasty (I'd take shell along, but shells are not that hot compare to waxed calf).

post #13783 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

What is wheat paste? Is it like a flour mixed with some sort of oil?

Quote:
Originally Posted by traverscao View Post

I think it's water, Pat, because water is the only thing that can evaporate fast enough to harden the compound for burnishing.

Actually it is just wheat flour and water. Or you can use wallpaper paste. But it shouldn't be allowed to dry, at least not completely. It requires a polished piece of rosewood, boxwood or holly--something along those lines--or bone and the paste is applied and then rubbed until a glaze forms.

edited for punctuation and clarity

--
Edited by DWFII - 2/28/15 at 1:48pm
post #13784 of 19043
I don't know why I have such a fascination with this stuff. I wonder if this can be done on one of horweens naked veg tanned hides on the opposite side. As we know their waxed flesh is bullshit.
post #13785 of 19043
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I don't know why I have such a fascination with this stuff. I wonder if this can be done on one of horweens naked veg tanned hides on the opposite side. As we know their waxed flesh is bullshit.

Pat, you're not the only one. I have had wet dreams about waxed calf for fucking ever. 

 

It can be home done, thanks largely to @DWFII, and I am experimenting with an old pair of boots. However, I am not very sure if I want to go for lye soap. 

 

It is, indeed, one fascinating piece of leather, a lost art that would be completely lost in 5 years if we don't do something about that. If I ever have access to this stuff, I'll grab it without hesitation, regardless of pricing. 

 

If you want to try, Tandy leather carries veg tanned cattlehide, of 3 - 7 oz, and if you have an attic, go forth. It is time consuming, but I'd take the chance if I have. Seriously.

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